Accessible Unlicensed Requires Authentication Published by De Gruyter Mouton August 18, 2021

Chuang Tzu’s selflessness: mind-state and the cultural semiotics of jingshen

Zhong Chen and Tingting Yao
From the journal Chinese Semiotic Studies

Abstract

The cognitive paradigm of symbols in ancient Chinese philosophy is quite distinct from that of Western semiotic circles. Chuang Tzu, one of the most influential ancient Chinese philosophers, concentrates his study on exploring the state of the subject’s selflessness and establishes his own cognitive paradigm of jingshen. This paper uses his statements of “I lost myself” and “The Perfect Man uses his mind like a mirror” in The adjustment of controversies of The Chuang Tzu, to investigate the ideal selfless mind-state and selflessness. It attempts to transfer the relationship between subject and object in symbolic cognition into the connection of intersubjectivity to construct jingshen’s cognitive paradigm of releasing symbolic meaning. The task of this research is to overcome the limitation created by the subject–object relation and finally to be “the Perfect Man” who can know the Dao.


Corresponding author: Tingting Yao, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing, China, E-mail:

References

Benvenuto, Bice & Roger Kennedy. 1986. The works of Jacques Lacan: An introduction. London: Free Association Books.Search in Google Scholar

Bunnin, Nicholas & Jiyuan Yu (eds.). 2001. Dictionary of Western philosophy: English–Chinese. Beijing: People’s Publishing House.Search in Google Scholar

Chuang, Tzu. 1996. Chung Tzu: Basic writings. Trans. by Burton Watson. New York: Columbia University Press.Search in Google Scholar

Chen, Guying. 2020. The annotated critical Zhuangzi: With contemporary explication and traditional commentary. Beijing: Chuang Wha Book Company.Search in Google Scholar

Chen, Zhong & Tingting Yao. 2020. The cognitive paradigm of jingshen. Chinese Semiotic Studies 16(4). 535–550.Search in Google Scholar

Chuang, Tzu. 2016. 庄子 [The Chuang Tzu]. Trans. by James Legge. Zhengzhou: Zhongzhou Ancient Books Publishing House.Search in Google Scholar

Guo, Xiang (Jin Dynasty) & Cheng Xuanying (Tang Dynasty). 2011. Annotation of Chuang Tzu. Beijing: Chuang Wha Book Company.Search in Google Scholar

Ggongdzu-Yunden, Gyatso. Tibetan morphometry. 2009. Trans. by Yang Huaquan. Beijing: Chuang Wha Book Company.Search in Google Scholar

Heidegger, Martin. 1953. Being and time. Trans. by Joan Stambaugh. New York: State University of New York Press.Search in Google Scholar

Jung, Carl G. & Richard Wilhelm. 1962. The secret of the golden flower: A Chinese book of life. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.Search in Google Scholar

Lao, Tseu. 2016. 道德经 [Tao Te Ching]. Trans. by James Legge. Zhengzhou: Zhongzhou Ancient Books Publishing House.Search in Google Scholar

Lu, Jiuyuan (Song Dynasty). 1980. Collected works of Lu Jiuyuan. Beijing: Chuang Wha Book Company.Search in Google Scholar

Mencius. 2016. 孟子 [The works of Mencius]. Trans. by James Legge. Zhengzhou: Zhongzhou Ancient Books Publishing House.Search in Google Scholar

Moran, Dermont & Joseph Cohen. 2012. The Husserl dictionary. London, New York: Continuum International Publishing Group.Search in Google Scholar

Peirce, Charles Sanders. 1958. In Arthur W. Burks (ed.), Collected papers of Charles Sanders Peirce, vols. VII–VIII. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press, Harvard University Press.Search in Google Scholar

Pu, Ji (Song Dynasty). 2011. Wu Deng Hui Yuan. In Zhu Junhong (ed.). Haikou: Hainan Publishing House.Search in Google Scholar

Saussure, Ferdinand de. 1959. Course in general linguistics. Trans by Wade Baskin. New York: Columbia University Press.Search in Google Scholar

Wang, Bi (Wei Dynasty). 2012. General remarks on the Changes of the Zhou. Beijing: Chuang Wha Book Company.Search in Google Scholar

Zhao, Yiheng. 2011. The principles and deduction of semiotics. Nanjing: Nanjing University Press.Search in Google Scholar

Published Online: 2021-08-18
Published in Print: 2021-08-26

© 2021 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston