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Trump and the Republican Congress: The Challenges of Governing

  • Jason S. Byers EMAIL logo and Jamie L. Carson EMAIL logo
From the journal The Forum

Abstract

This essay highlights the challenges faced by the Trump Administration during the first 8 months of his presidency despite unified Republican control of both chambers of Congress. It begins by focusing briefly on the lead-up to the 2016 election before turning to the struggles the administration has faced in enacting policies since inauguration. The essay concludes with a look ahead at the 2018 midterm elections and the implications for the remainder of the Trump presidency.


Corresponding authors: Jason S. Byers, PhD. Candidate, Department of Political Science, School of Public and International Affairs, University of Georgia, Baldwin Hall, Athens, GA 30602, USA; and Jamie L. Carson, Professor of Political Science, Department of Political Science, School of Public and International Affairs, University of Georgia, 304B Baldwin Hall, Athens, GA 30602, USA

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Published Online: 2017-11-7

©2017 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston

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