Skip to content
Accessible Published by De Gruyter December 31, 2021

Quenching and Distortion*

Abschreckung und Verzug
R. Fechte-Heinen and Th. Lübben

Abstract

This paper is based on a keynote lecture presented by Prof. Fechte-Heinen during the 2nd International Conference on Quenching and Distortion Engineering in April 2021. Firstly, it presents a short summary of the basics of distortion formation. The mechanisms and the potential for distortion with its carriers are discussed in more detail. Furthermore, the method of Distortion Engineering is explained. Finally, selected examples are presented that illustrate the connections between distortion and the quenching process.

Kurzfassung

Dieser Beitrag basiert auf einem der Hauptvorträge der 2nd International Conference on Quenching and Distortion Engineering im April 2021, der von Prof. Fechte-Heinen gehalten wurde. Zunächst wird ein kurzer Überblick über die Grundlagen der Verzugsbildung gegeben. Die Mechanismen und das Verzugspotenzial mit seinen Trägern werden näher erläutert. Weiterhin wird die Methode des „Distortion Engineering“ erläutert. Abschließend werden ausgewählte Beispiele vorgestellt, die die Zusammenhänge zwischen Verzug und dem Abschreckprozess verdeutlichen.

1 Introduction

It is well known throughout the world that dimensional and shape changes in components, which in many cases only become visible after heat treatment, lead to very high costs due to reworking or scrap. However, it is also known that not only the heat treatment is responsible for these dimensional and shape changes. Rather, the causes can be found in each individual process of the production chain, including the design. Based on this knowledge, the Collaborative Research Center „Distortion Engineering – Distortion Control in Manufacturing“ was established in 2001 on the initiative of Prof. Peter Mayr. In the period from 2001–2011, under his leadership and that of his successor Prof. Hans-Werner Zoch, a wealth of fundamental work on distortion generation and control was carried out, which was made available to the academic and industrial community in more than 400 publications. As representative of this, two papers are to be mentioned here, which present the first considerations on Distortion Engineering [17] and an overview of the results obtained [19].

In accordance with the title of the 2nd International Conference on Quenching and Distortion Engineering, only the quenching process and its influence on distortion shall be taken into account here. In addition, reference should be made to some publications that have dealt with other processes and other sources of distortion and present excellent overviews: [1, 2, 3, 4].

Quenching involves a great risk of producing dimensional and shape changes. This is due to the fact that the critical cooling rate of the respective material must be exceeded in order to produce the required hardness values. Depending on the quenching medium, the dimensions, and the material of the component, this requirement can lead to large temperature gradients which in turn generate thermal stresses. This is the basis for deformations and distortion. A second aspect is in general the minimisation of costs. Conventionally this will be achieved by building huge batches of as many parts as possible. Typically, such a batch consists of many layers depending on the dimensions of the heating chamber. The result is that the inhomogeneity of cooling rates in the complete batch volume is much larger than for a single component. This again can be a basis for distortion and large scattering of the dimensional and size changes. Other aspects of quenching that are relevant to distortion have been presented in the QDE papers by Eva Troell [5] and Scott Mackenzie [6]. In addition, the second edition of the „Handbook of Quenchants and Quenching Techniques“ will be published in 2022 by ASM, with a chapter containing many more examples on the subject of quenching and distortion [7].

In the following, a short summary of the basics of distortion formation will be presented. More details can be found, for example, in [8] and [9]. The mechanisms and the distortion potential with its carriers are discussed in more detail and the method of Distortion Engineering is explained. Finally, selected examples are presented that illustrate the connections between distortion and the quenching process.

1.1 Mechanisms

Dimensional and shape changes can be caused by volume changes or deformations (Fig. 1). Such changes may be induced by various processes in a component.

Fig. 1 Causes of distortion [11]

Bild 1. Ursachen des Verzugs [11]

Fig. 1

Causes of distortion [11]

Bild 1. Ursachen des Verzugs [11]

1.1.1 Volume changes

Volume changes result in principle from density and mass changes. The latter case occurs in every thermochemical treatment, since in the course of this process step, additional atoms are introduced into the area near the surface. Of course, unwanted changes such as surface layer oxidation or decarburisation also contribute to this effect. These intentional or unintentional surface layer modifications usually also lead to density changes in addition to the mass change. However, the density is also influenced by phase transformations and precipitation processes, which in turn are determined by the chemical composition and the temperature-time path that has been followed. Furthermore, stresses can have an influence on the transformation behaviour, too [10].

Figure 2 shows the dependence of the reciprocal density – the specific volume – on the dissolved carbon content [12]. This diagram of Lement is based on X-ray measurements of the lattice constants. For example, austenite requires the smallest volume per unit mass and thus has the highest density. Phase mixtures of ferrite and cementite as well as martensite require more volume. With increasing carbon content, the specific volume for all the phases mentioned increases approximately linearly. The difference between the curves for ferrite + cementite and martensite increases significantly with increasing carbon content. The same applies to the volume change of a component after martensitic hardening, which consisted of ferrite and cementite in the initial state. It becomes clear that the volume changes depend on final and initial microstructure. The resulting volume changes can be estimated with the help of Figure 2 or by using the formulas given in [12].

Fig. 2 Effects of micro-structure on specific volume of carbon steels [12]
Bild 2. Auswirkungen des Gefüges auf das spezifische Volumen von Kohlenstoffstählen [12]

Fig. 2

Effects of micro-structure on specific volume of carbon steels [12]

Bild 2. Auswirkungen des Gefüges auf das spezifische Volumen von Kohlenstoffstählen [12]

1.1.2 Deformations

Deformations contributing to distortion can be divided into plastic and elastic deformations. The elastic deformations relevant for the dimensional and shape changes are due to heat treatment, occur during the heat treatment itself, and are caused by the residual stresses of the component (Fig. 1). Any change in the residual stress state of the finished component inevitably leads to changes in the elastic deformations and thus to dimensional and shape changes. This can be caused, for example, by thermal or mechanical loads during use of the component. Mechanical influences in the stress equilibrium, e. g. by local ablation processes, can also lead to deformations.

Stresses are necessary to generate plastic deformations. These can have several causes. On the one hand, they can be thermal and transformation stresses, as they occur in many heat treatment processes due to thermal or thermal and chemical gradients. On the other hand, load stresses can lead to dimensional and shape changes. One example are quenching fixtures, which are used for the targeted generation of straightening forces when quenching certain groups of components such as synchroniser rings, sliding sleeves, coupling bodies and ring gears [13]. It should not be forgotten that the component‘s own weight acts as a load stress. Especially for thin-walled parts, load stresses of a critical level can arise here if there is a lack of mechanical support or in combination with friction between the component and the support, especially in the case of multi-layer charging.

Residual stresses originating from the processes before heat treatment have the same effect as the above-mentioned residual stresses after heat treatment. The difference is that during heat treatment the temperatures are inevitably higher than in use. Accordingly, this can result in significantly greater dimensional and shape changes. Details on this and the previous aspect are presented by Surm [14] using the example of the production of bearing rings.

Plastic deformations can be caused by stresses via various mechanisms: by exceeding the yield limit, by creep processes (Fig. 3), or by transformation plasticity (Fig. 4). The first mechanism requires a minimum stress that is greater than the local yield limit. This value depends, among other things, on temperature (Fig. 3, left). At low temperatures, comparatively large stresses can be elastically tolerated. As the temperature rises, however, this resistance to plastic deformation decreases more and more down to only a few tens of MPa at usual holding temperatures. In addition, at these temperatures only a slight strain hardening occurs, so that small exceedances of the yield limit can lead to large plastic deformations: e. g. 65 MPa are sufficient at 700 °C to produce a plastic deformation of 0.2 % (Fig. 3, left).

Fig. 3 Left: stress strain curves of spheroidised SAE52100 (strain rate 40 × 10-4 1/s), right: plastic deformation by creep at 940 °C for SAE5120 [15]


Bild 3. Links: Spannungs-Dehnungs-Kurven von GKZ-geglühtem 100Cr6 (Dehnungsrate 40 × 10-4 1/s), rechts: plastische Verformung durch Kriechen bei 940 °C für 20MnCr5 [15]

Fig. 3

Left: stress strain curves of spheroidised SAE52100 (strain rate 40 × 10-4 1/s), right: plastic deformation by creep at 940 °C for SAE5120 [15]

Bild 3. Links: Spannungs-Dehnungs-Kurven von GKZ-geglühtem 100Cr6 (Dehnungsrate 40 × 10-4 1/s), rechts: plastische Verformung durch Kriechen bei 940 °C für 20MnCr5 [15]

Fig. 4 Influence of stresses on length change during martensitic hardening of SAE4140H [16]
Bild 4. Einfluss von Spannungen auf die Längenänderung beim martensitischen Härten von 42CrMo4 [16]

Fig. 4

Influence of stresses on length change during martensitic hardening of SAE4140H [16]

Bild 4. Einfluss von Spannungen auf die Längenänderung beim martensitischen Härten von 42CrMo4 [16]

The second distortion-relevant plasticity mechanism – creep – does not require a minimum stress. It is observed especially at elevated temperatures and is a time-dependent effect (Fig. 3, right). Even at a very moderate stress of 5 MPa, a plastic deformation of 0.2 % is found after one hour at a temperature of 940 °C, which is common for carburising. Furthermore, the carburising times are usually significantly longer.

Transformation plasticity also does not require a minimum stress for plastic deformation. The transformation-plastic strain increment is proportional to the stress deviator and always occurs when a transformation process and a non-hydrostatic stress occur simultaneously [16]. It does not matter whether austenite or a ferritic phase is formed. Figure 4 shows dilatometer curves for the formation of martensite in SAE 4140 (42CrMo4). It can be seen that a stress applied shortly before the start of the transformation clearly leads to changes when compared to the stress-free curve. For the martensite formation in SAE 4140, the proportionality constant resulted in a value of 4.2 × 10-5 mm2/N. This means that at a stress of 50 MPa, a transformation-plastic strain of 0.2 % after completed transformation results in this case.

1.2 Distortion potential

The considerations presented so far have been of a general nature and essentially independent of manufacturing processes. In the following, the variables that are decisive for the formation of distortion are introduced. The text is partly cited from [7].

When looking at the crown wheel in Figure 5, it is immediately clear that there is significantly less mass in the area of the toothing than in the lower part. In addition, the toothing results in a significantly larger surface area than the base body of the crown wheel. From these facts, it immediately follows that the toothing area cools significantly faster during a quenching process. The resulting thermal strains are also distributed asymmetrically (top/ bottom) and lead to stresses that cause the crown wheel to tilt. The reason for this shape change is the asymmetry of the mass distribution of the crown wheel. The geometry must therefore be considered as a factor influencing the potential for distortion.

Fig. 5 Potential factors influencing distortion [17]
Bild 5. Mögliche Einflussfaktoren auf den Verzug [17]

Fig. 5

Potential factors influencing distortion [17]

Bild 5. Mögliche Einflussfaktoren auf den Verzug [17]

In the second example in Figure 5, the ball was no longer spherical after hardening, but an ellipsoid. After cutting in the direction of the extreme radius change, an inhomogeneous, asymmetrical distribution of the microstructure was observed. This asymmetry results from an asymmetrical distribution of the chemical composition, which is called segregation. These two distributions cause complex interactions during heat treatment. The differences in the microstructure lead to local differences in the volume change during austenitising and thus to transformation stresses. Furthermore, the variations in chemical composition provoke position-dependent transformation behaviour and thus complex distributions of stress and strain development.

After heat treatment, the ring in the third example of Figure 5 shows a large third-order amplitude in the Fourier spectrum of its roundness curve (triangularity). The distribution of residual stresses after machining measured by X-ray diffraction shows a similar triangularity as the roundness plot after heat treatment. It results from the interaction of clamping and turning during the machining process. During heating, these stresses are relieved by plastic deformation, which leads to the resulting dimensional and shape changes.

From these examples, it can be concluded that not only the visible asymmetry of the mass distribution causes distortion. The invisible asymmetries or inhomogeneities of other properties can also cause distortion due to complicated interactions during heat treatment. If a component contains such asymmetries, it contains a potential for distortion formation that is released during heat treatment and causes the measurable changes in size and shape. This potential is called the „distortion potential“ of a component and is not measurable. Measurable quantities are the so-called carriers of the distortion potential. These carriers are the distributions of

  • mass (geometry),

  • all relevant alloying elements,

  • microstructure including grain size,

  • (residual) stress,

  • mechanical history, and

  • temperature

in the entire volume of the component under consideration.

The mechanical history primarily accounts for the influence of the plastic deformations on the effects occurring after plasticisation. One example is the strain hardening behaviour (Bauschinger effect). Here, kinematic or isotropic behaviour or mixtures of these are discussed. Further details can be found elsewhere (e. g. [18]). Very high degrees of deformation occur in forming processes. In this case, mechanically induced recrystallisation effects have to be considered. Finally, the mechanical history can also have an influence on the forming behaviour.

The very important role of thermal expansions resulting from the temperature distribution has already been briefly addressed in the discussion of crown wheel distortion. However, the temperature distribution can also show asymmetries or inhomogeneity due to the heat transfer conditions, which are superimposed on the imperfections resulting from the geometry.

From the point of view of process chain simulation, these carriers – with the exception of geometry – are the distributions of the state variables at the end of a process within the manufacturing chain and must be specified as initial conditions for the simulation of the next process. However, for understanding origin of the distortion, the interactions of the state variables during the processes must be analysed.

In conclusion, it must be stated that distortion is not only a heat treatment problem. Changes in the carriers of the distortion potential can occur at any step of the manufacturing chain. Therefore, distortion is a system property and the control of distortion in manufacturing processes must follow a system-oriented approach. Here, the relevant system is the entire manufacturing chain!

2 Distortion Engineering

To deal with distortion problems, a three-level strategy called “Distortion Engineering” was developed [19]. Always taking into account the entire process chain, this methodology consists of three levels of investigations (Fig. 6). On level 1, the parameters and variables influencing distortion in every manufacturing step must be identified (see section 3.1) and analysed. In general, a large number of parameters may be important. Therefore, Design of Experiment (DoE) techniques should be applied which allows the experimental investigation of larger numbers of parameters by a limited number of samples, enabling the identification of the main influencing parameters and relevant interactions between them.

Fig. 6 Method Distortion Engineering [19]
Bild 6. Methode „Distortion Engineering“ [19]

Fig. 6

Method Distortion Engineering [19]

Bild 6. Methode „Distortion Engineering“ [19]

After identifying the major influencing parameters, level 2 focuses on understanding the distortion mechanisms by using the concept of distortion potential and its carriers (see section 3.2). Modeling and simulation are helpful, in many cases necessary tools to fully understand the mechanisms ruling the distortion generation. Understanding the mechanisms in many cases already allow for reduction of distortion.

Distortion Engineering aims to compensate distortion, using the so-called “Compensation Potential” (level 3). On the one hand, this approach uses the conventional method to increase the homogeneity, respectively the symmetry, of the carriers of the distortion potential. On the other hand, well-directed insertions of additional inhomogeneities/asymmetries in one or more of the distributions of the carriers can be used to compensate the resulting size and shape changes of the unavoidable asymmetries. For example, an inhomogeneous quenching process can be used to compensate shape changes from the previous manufacturing process (see section 3.2.2). In principle a compensation is possible for single components. With this regard, in-process measurement and control techniques can be very important [8].

3 Influence of quenching processes on distortion – examples

In this section, selected examples are presented that illustrate the connections between distortion and the quenching process. The examples have been chosen to cover all levels of distortion engineering. More examples are included in the 2nd edition of the „Handbook of Quenchants and Quenching Techniques“ [7]. The following examples are partly cited from this book.

3.1 Examples from Level 1: Parameters and variables

3.1.1 Ring – Influence of quenching medium: Oil versus high pressure gas quenching (HPGQ)

Bearing races from SAE 52100 with different ratios of diameter to wall thickness (11.2; 12.0; 20) and volume to surface (3.6 mm; 4.0 mm; 2.6 mm) (Fig. 7, left picture) were quenched in

  • a two-chamber furnace with a high-speed quenching oil at 60 °C

  • a two-chamber vacuum furnace in Helium with a pressure of 20 bar

In both cases the batches consist of nine layers each with as many rings as possible (for example eight parts for ring type 7, Fig. 7, right picture).

The rings were measured before and after hardening and changes of diameter, out of roundness, and conicity were determined. Figure 8 shows exemplarily the conicity of ring type 7. In all layers, gas quenching leads to positive values of this shape change. This means that after quenching the rings have a smaller diameter at the upper surface than at the lower end. Furthermore, no significant layer dependency can be observed. For oil quenched rings, the conicity depends strongly on the layer number. Here, a clear trend from negative to positive values with increasing layer number exists. Additionally, the scattering of conicity per layer is in most of the layers larger than for high pressure gas quenching.

Fig. 7 Geometries and batch structure [20]
Bild 7. Geometrien und Chargenstruktur [20]

Fig. 7

Geometries and batch structure [20]

Bild 7. Geometrien und Chargenstruktur [20]

Fig. 8 Conicity of type 7 as function of layer number and quenching medium [20]

Bild 8. Konizität des Typs 7 in Abhängigkeit von Lagenzahl und Abschreckmedium [20]

Fig. 8

Conicity of type 7 as function of layer number and quenching medium [20]

Bild 8. Konizität des Typs 7 in Abhängigkeit von Lagenzahl und Abschreckmedium [20]

A summary of all results of these investigations is given in Table 1. The difference between maximum and minimum value (range) is in all cases significantly smaller after HPGQ. The same is true for the mean values of diameter and roundness. Only the absolute mean values of conicity are smaller for the oil quenching. The reason for this result can be seen in a lower scattering of cooling curves both in the circumferential direction of each individual ring and over the entire batch.

Table 1

Range and mean value as function of ring type and quenching medium [20]

Tabelle 1. Spannweite und Mittelwert in Abhängigkeit von Ringtyp und Abschreckmedium [20]

Change of range mean value
Type 4 Type 6 Type 7 Type 4 Type 6 Type 7
gas oil gas oil gas oil gas oil gas oil gas oil
Outer diameter [%] 0.060 0.106 0.076 0.145 0.068 0.135 0.069 0.106 0.087 0.131 0.063 0.123
Roundness [μm] 99 147 177 280 220 384 51 75 83 91 145 182
Conicity [μm] 113 168 145 278 88 258 82 -15 109 -31 84 -11

3.1.2 Weight reduced gear – Influence of quenching medium: Oil versus salt bath versus HPGQ

In this study [21], the distortion behaviour of mass-reduced counter gears (Fig. 9, left) was analysed. Among other things, the influence of the quenching medium on the radius change at the tooth tip was determined. Quenching was carried out in a high-performance quenching oil (Durixol W72), in a salt bath (AS140) and with helium under 18 bar and a flow direction from top to bottom. Five components each were measured before and after heat treatment. Figure 9, right, shows the resulting radius changes along the tooth tip. With oil quenching, these changes are perfectly linear over z. This corresponds to a pure tilt. With HPGQ, the measured values lie on an almost perfect parabola with only a slight tilting superimposed. The salt quenching results in radius changes that form a mixture of these before-mentioned two cases. The reasons for these results have not been clarified so far. However, a pure tilting and pure dimensional change after oil quenching can be compensated by adjusting the dimensions of the toothing. Furthermore, quenching in salt bath and HPGQ lead to acceptable dimensional and shape changes so that this distortion is probably tolerable.

Fig. 9 Left: geometry of a weight reduced counter gear, right: radius changes at tooth head as function of z-coordinate [21]
Bild 9. Links: Geometrie eines gewichtsreduzierten Vorgelegerads, rechts: Radiusänderungen am Zahnkopf als Funktion der z-Koordinate [21]

Fig. 9

Left: geometry of a weight reduced counter gear, right: radius changes at tooth head as function of z-coordinate [21]

Bild 9. Links: Geometrie eines gewichtsreduzierten Vorgelegerads, rechts: Radiusänderungen am Zahnkopf als Funktion der z-Koordinate [21]

3.1.3 Crown gear – Influence of quenching medium and batching: batch quenching in oil versus single-part quenching with HPGQ

An additional reduction of the distortion potential is possible by nozzle field gas quenching. This technique uses a quenching tool that is tailored for one specific geometry. Parameters of the tailoring process are number, positions, and orientations of the nozzles. Furthermore, the pressure and a total flow rate for the complete nozzle field must be chosen. It can be necessary to define groups of nozzles and to provide each group with different flow rates. These parameters have to be defined to firstly achieve the desired hardness distributions. The second goal is the minimisation of thermal stresses inside the component. Nozzle field quenching leads a priori to inhomogeneous distributions of heat transfer coefficients (HTC). Therefore, a rotation of the component is an appropriate method to homogenise the temperature distribution. An actual system called “4D Quenching Chamber” is shown in Figure 10, left picture [22]. With this quenching tool, crown gears with an outer diameter of 200 mm were case hardened. For comparison, quenching was done by a classical oil quenching in a batch. The results are summarised in Figure 10, right picture. The quenching process in the tailored quenching tool produces significant smaller values of flatness of top surface of bore, roundness deviation of the bore, and axial runout of bottom surface of the bore. Additionally, the scattering of these shape changes is less than 50 % compared to oil quenching [22]. These results show the potential of such tailored quenching tools, even though the effort in designing and operating quenching processes tailored to one specific geometry will be significant higher compared to conventional processes.

Fig. 10 Left: “4D Quenching Chamber” in combination with high pressure gas quenching, right: Comparison of oil quenching in a batch and single piece quenching [22]
Bild 10. Links: „4D Quenching Chamber“ in Kombination mit Hochdruck-Gasabschreckung, rechts: Vergleich der Ölabschreckung in einer Charge mit der Einzelteilabschreckung [22]

Fig. 10

Left: “4D Quenching Chamber” in combination with high pressure gas quenching, right: Comparison of oil quenching in a batch and single piece quenching [22]

Bild 10. Links: „4D Quenching Chamber“ in Kombination mit Hochdruck-Gasabschreckung, rechts: Vergleich der Ölabschreckung in einer Charge mit der Einzelteilabschreckung [22]

3.2 Examples from Level 2: Carriers of distortion potential and distortion mechanisms

3.2.1 Ring – Influence of rewetting during oil quenching – hanging versus laying and oil versus gas nozzle field

In this example, rings made from SAE 52100 and dimensions of ri = 66.5 mm, ro = 72.5 mm, H = 26 mm were investigated [23]. Central question was the influence of rewetting on distortion. The quenching was conducted in a high-speed quenching oil. The bath temperature was 60 °C and the oil was agitated. Horizontally and vertically oriented rings were investigated. The horizontally oriented rings were lying on two types of supports: Stars with three and eight supporting lines. For reference, rings were quenched in a gas nozzle field (Figure 11, left picture) by use of nitrogen. This quenching facility enables an inhomogeneous but highly symmetric quenching process. More details about it can be found in [24]. For each variant, six rings were heat treated.

Fig. 11 Left: gas nozzle field for quenching of rings, right: change of Fourier coefficients a2 and a3 of roundness plots [23]
Bild 11. Links: Gasdüsenfeld zum Abschrecken von Ringen, rechts: Änderung der Fourier-Koeffizienten a2 and a3 der Rundheitsschriebe [23]

Fig. 11

Left: gas nozzle field for quenching of rings, right: change of Fourier coefficients a2 and a3 of roundness plots [23]

Bild 11. Links: Gasdüsenfeld zum Abschrecken von Ringen, rechts: Änderung der Fourier-Koeffizienten a2 and a3 der Rundheitsschriebe [23]

To investigate rewetting, supplementary tests were carried out in a laboratory quenching tank. The rewetting kinetics were recorded with a video camera.

From roundness plots measured on the inside and outside of the rings before and after heat treatment, firstly the mean value of inside and outside radius was calculated. Then, a Fourier transformation was applied to these plots [15]. The results are amplitude and phase of the kth order ak und αk. By using this data, the roundness plots can be described by corresponding Fourier series:

(1) R ¯ ( α ) = R i ( α ) + R o ( α ) 2 = R ¯ 0 + k = 2 a k × cos k × α + α k

R0 corresponds to the average of R(α ). The amplitudes ak can be interpreted very descriptively as eccentricity, ovality, triangularity, … . The phasing is of particular importance because from this data, information about preferred directions – e. g. orientation of segregation lines, clamping devices, or orientation in a batch – can be attained. Figure 11, right picture, shows the differences between measurements after and before heat treatment for ovality and triangularity. The best results for the 2nd order were received by horizontally arranged rings (lying) on a support with three lines and oil quenching: the smallest average value with a comparable scatter as gas nozzle field quenching. The largest ovality changes in combination with a huge scatter band were produced by the vertical arrangement of the rings. The 3rd order amplitudes for lying rings are a little bit larger than the corresponding changes for gas nozzle field quenching. In this case, the greatest changes also can be found for the vertically hanging rings.

The change of conicity for horizontally batched and oil quenched rings is negative. This means that the ring radius increases when approaching top surface (Fig. 12). This is exactly the result that was observed in huge batches in the lower layers (section 3.1.1). The number of lines of the support has no measurable influence here. The rings quenched vertically oriented in oil respectively in the gas nozzle field in the average show no change of conicity.

Fig. 12 Change of conicity of outer surface [23]
Bild 12. Änderung der Konizität der Außenfläche [23]

Fig. 12

Change of conicity of outer surface [23]

Bild 12. Änderung der Konizität der Außenfläche [23]

For oil quenched rings, the situation depends strongly on the orientation of the ring related to the gravity vector. In case of horizontally batched rings, the rewetting process produces large non-symmetric temperature gradients in axial direction (Fig. 13, left picture). If the flow field in the quench tank is homogeneous around the inner and outer ring surfaces and no disturbances influence the ring surface, like for example cinder, then the rewetting behavior is homogenous in circumferential direction. Consequently, no temperature gradients occur in this direction. Potential disturbances caused by the support or by the fixation wires were not observed to influence the rewetting process. Consequently, such a quenching process shows a distortion potential only for changes of conicity.

Fig. 13 Rewetting of horizontal lying and vertical hanging rings [23]
Bild 13. Wiederbenetzung horizontal liegender und vertikalhängender Ringe [23]

Fig. 13

Rewetting of horizontal lying and vertical hanging rings [23]

Bild 13. Wiederbenetzung horizontal liegender und vertikalhängender Ringe [23]

During oil quenching of vertically arranged rings, the rewetting process is symmetrical with respect to the middle plane of the ring cross section (Fig. 13, right picture). Therefore, temperature gradients in axial direction are present but symmetrical. In tangential direction, the flow fields of liquid and vapor depend on position. The oil temperature and also the vapor temperature vary with increasing distance to the lower end of the ring. Furthermore, the flow-off of the vapor occurs anti parallel to the gravity vector.

These effects produce an inhomogeneous heat transfer and therefore an asymmetric temperature distribution in circumferential direction. Thus, such a quenching process only leads to a distortion potential for changes in roundness.

3.2.2 Ring – Influence of quenching media and transformation plasticity: gas nozzle field, HPGQ, salt bath, and oil

Surm et al. investigated the influence of the quenching process on ring distortion and analysed the responsible plasticity mechanism [25]. They used thin-walled rings (ro = 72.5 mm, ri = 66.5 mm, H = 26 mm) made of SAE 52100 (100Cr6) and SAE 304 (X5CrNi18-10), an austenitic steel. The quenching was done by gas nozzle field (Fig. 11, left), HPGQ with gas flow directions top-bottom and bottom-top, oil and salt. From roundness plots before and after heat treatment, the change of Fourier coefficients was determined by Fourier transformation. The results are given in Figure 14. The average radius change (Fourier order 0) for SAE 52100 rings depends on the quenching conditions and can be explained by three aspects: The use of different furnaces with varying austenitising conditions leads to different amounts of dissolved carbon and therefore varying amounts of retained austenite. The varying cooling intensity leads by different stress developments to different partitioning of the volume change to dimensions. Furthermore, amounts of unwanted bainite can result (HPGQ).

Fig. 14 Influence of quenching process and steel grade on change of Fourier amplitudes of roundness plots: Left: SAE 52100, right: SAE 304 [25]
Bild 14. Einfluss des Abschreckprozesses und der Stahlsorte auf die Änderung der Fourier-Amplituden der Rundheitsschriebe: Links: 100Cr6, rechts: X5CrNi18-10 [25]

Fig. 14

Influence of quenching process and steel grade on change of Fourier amplitudes of roundness plots: Left: SAE 52100, right: SAE 304 [25]

Bild 14. Einfluss des Abschreckprozesses und der Stahlsorte auf die Änderung der Fourier-Amplituden der Rundheitsschriebe: Links: 100Cr6, rechts: X5CrNi18-10 [25]

The change in roundness deviation is primarily defined by a change in the 2nd order coefficient. Except for oil quenching, no major difference can be identified between the examined quenching technologies. Therefore, the quenching processes by salt and gas generate no second order inhomogeneity in the corresponding temperature distributions under the given conditions. The resulting values of change in ovality result from other carrier of distortion potential. The significantly increased 2nd order Fourier coefficient for oil quenching has to be explained by a more inhomogeneous temperature distribution with 2nd order amounts and/or increased gradients in radial direction (Figure 14, left picture).

To receive a distorted component, plasticisation must be taken into account (Fig. 1). During a quenching process, creep will not occur because of its small duration. Therefore, only two mechanisms are possible: yielding and transformation plasticity (see section 1.1.2). To understand which of it acts for different quenching processes, the experiments with the austenitic rings (SAE 304) were performed as a comparison. This steel shows no phase transformation. Consequently, transformation plasticity has not to be taken into account. The resulting change of radius (0th Fourier order) is significantly smaller because no change of volume after quenching can occur (Figure 14, right picture). This radius change increases from gas to salt and oil quenching, respectively, and correlates with increasing stresses and rising radial temperature gradients. The consequence is a growing anisotropy of the dimensional change of average radius, wall thickness, and width. Nevertheless, the sum of these changes remains constant at zero.

The higher order Fourier coefficients follow the same principle. From gas to salt and oil quenching, the heat transfer coefficient increases, which results in growing radial temperature gradients. Consequently, the deformations in the rings increase too if a temperature inhomogeneity in circumferential direction is present. This must have been the case for 2nd and 3rd order for oil quenching and can principally be explained by variations in the flow field during quenching. Then, the final step is the excess of the yield limit. The comparison of these results with the data of bearing rings (SAE 52100, Figure 14, left picture) shows the additional effect of transformation plasticity. Most of the shape changes of thin walled rings result from this plasticisation mechanism.

3.2.3 Ring – Damping factor of thin walled rings for inhomogeneous carriers of distortion potential

In this example, Surm et al. used a gas nozzle field (Fig. 11) for the generation of controlled inhomogeneous temperature fields during quench hardening [25]. This was done by adjusting different varying flow fields with equal amplitudes in the Fourier orders two, three, and six. Only the gas flow field at the outer raceway was varied while the inner gas distribution was kept constant. This procedure ensures on one hand that the rings were correctly hardened. On the other hand, the strain respectively the strain gradient distribution in radial direction was constant for all investigated orders.

The results of these tests are summarised in Figure 15. The mean change in radius of the rings (Fourier order 0) is practically not affected by the variation of quenching conditions. Despite of a homogeneous cooling, a change of about 35 μm in the second order of the outer raceway is identified due to heat treatment. Nearly the same behavior of this order can be evaluated when the rings were quenched in a non-uniform way with a variation of the gas flow field in the third and sixth order. This constant distortion behavior may be caused by releasing of distortion potential during heat treatment, which was introduced during the manufacturing of the rings.

Fig. 15 Change of Fourier coefficients of rings due to non-uniform gas quenching (SAE 52100) [25]

Bild 15. Änderung der Fourier-Koeffizienten von Ringen aufgrund ungleichmäßiger Gasabschreckung (100Cr6) [25]

Fig. 15

Change of Fourier coefficients of rings due to non-uniform gas quenching (SAE 52100) [25]

Bild 15. Änderung der Fourier-Koeffizienten von Ringen aufgrund ungleichmäßiger Gasabschreckung (100Cr6) [25]

Non-uniform quenching with high amplitude in Fourier order two results in a significantly increased ovality of the outer raceway in the quenched state. Similar results are identified if non-uniform quenching is realised with the same high amplitude in Fourier order three or six, respectively. Compared to the other cases, a larger change in the corresponding shape changes of the outer raceway is caused. The amplitude of the corresponding Fourier order, however, decreases with increasing order even though non-uniform quenching was always done with the same amplitude in the gas flow field.

Theoretical investigations of Frerichs [26] have shown, that for

  • thin walled rings (diameter much larger than wall thickness),

  • with constant wall thickness over the width (ring with rectangular cross section),

  • plane strain, and

  • only deformations in radial direction

the Fourier amplitudes in Equation 1 are proportional to a damping factor:

(2) a k 1 k 2 1 k = 2 , 3 ,

No assumptions about the sources of the deformations in the ring were used in these investigations. Therefore, this damping factor is a property of the geometry ‘ring’ itself. A comparison of theoretical (Equation 2) and experimental (Fig. 15) change in amplitude due to non-uniform quenching is given in Table 2. The experimental ratios ak/a2 for the different Fourier orders shows practically the same value compared to the predictions and confirms the theoretical considerations in an excellent way.

Table 2

Comparison of Fourier coefficient ratio ak/a2 determined by inhomogeneous quenching experiments and theoretical prediction of strain analysis [8]

Tabelle 2. Vergleich des durch inhomogene Abschreckversuche ermittelten Fourier-Koeffizientenverhältnisses ak/a2 mit der theoretischen Vorhersage der Dehnungsanalyse [8]

Order k ak [μm] experimental ak/a2 experimental 1/(k2-1) Equation 2
2 151
3 56 0.371 0.375
6 14 0.093 0.086

But what is the consequence of this property? The answer is quite simple. If a given deformation distribution acts into the ring, then the ring answers in such a way that the Fourier order k of this distribution is damped by the factor according to Equation 2. An order 2 will be damped by a factor 1/3, the order 3 by 1/8, etc. The geometry itself acts as a low-pass filter. For practical reasons, it has to be concluded that inhomogeneous carriers of distortion potential should not have low orders in their Fourier spectrum! Consequently, Distortion Engineering of rings should focus the avoidance or minimisation of second and third order periodicities in the carriers of distortion potential. This becomes more and more important with increasing radial gradients in the relevant carriers.

3.3 Examples from Level 3: Actions for compensation of distortion

3.3.1 Grooved cylinders: Compensation of asymmetrical mass distribution by High-Speed Quenching

Kobasko and Frerichs investigated the distortion behaviour of grooved cylindrical components with Intensive Quenching respectively High-Speed Quenching processes (IQ/HSQ). Kobasko et al. has studied this at first [27, 28]. Frerichs verified these experiments by own tests [29] and evaluated it in detail by simulation [30].

The mass distribution of a notched cylinder is non-axial symmetric due to the groove and therefore sensitive to bending (“banana shape”). The underlying idea of Kobasko was that the bending can be reduced by very intensive cooling and the more or less instantaneous formation of a martensite shell on the entire surface.

Frerichs conducted his tests with grooved cylinders made of SAE 1035 with diameters of 20 mm and 30 mm and a length of 150 mm. Depth and width of the grooves were 20 % of the diameter (Fig. 16, left picture). He used immersion cooling in non-agitated water and HSQ with different flow rates, heat transfer coefficients, and average water speed according to Table 3. The HSQ unit is schematically shown in Figure 16, right picture.

Table 3

Flow rates, heat transfer coefficients, and average water speed of quenching experiments [according to 29]

Tabelle 3. Durchflussraten, Wärmeübergangskoeffizienten und mittlere Wassergeschwindigkeit der Abschreckversuche [nach 29]

Flow [l/s] rate Workpiece diameter
∅ 20 mm ∅ 30 mm
HTC [kW/(m2K)] Water speed [m/s] HTC [kW/(m2K)] Water speed [m/s]
0 1–10 0 1–10 0
8 17.5 3.2 20.2 3.8
15 30.1 6.0 35.0 7.1
Fig. 16 Left: dimensions of grooved shafts and right: schematic drawing of the High-Speed Quenching facility [29]
Bild 16. Links: Abmessungen von genuteten Wellen und rechts: schematische Zeichnung der Hochgeschwindigkeits- Abschreckanlage [29]

Fig. 16

Left: dimensions of grooved shafts and right: schematic drawing of the High-Speed Quenching facility [29]

Bild 16. Links: Abmessungen von genuteten Wellen und rechts: schematische Zeichnung der Hochgeschwindigkeits- Abschreckanlage [29]

The resulting bending amplitudes and bending directions are shown in Figure 17. Measurements and simulations clearly show that the bending amplitude decreases continuously with increasing HTC regardless of the shaft diameter and approaches zero. Understandably, the bending amplitudes are smaller for the larger shaft diameter due to higher stiffness.

Fig. 17 Bending amplitudes and directions of grooved cylinders [30]
Bild 17. Biegeamplituden und -richtungen von genuteten Zylindern [30]

Fig. 17

Bending amplitudes and directions of grooved cylinders [30]

Bild 17. Biegeamplituden und -richtungen von genuteten Zylindern [30]

Furthermore, the directions of the shaft bending are indicated. The experimental values always point away from the groove with one exception. The simulations indicate that this special case occurs when the groove is not sufficiently cooled.

These results have shown that a carrier of distortion potential with pronounced asymmetry (here: geometry) can be almost compensated in its effect by the cleverly chosen superimposition of a second carrier (here: temperature).

3.3.2 Ring – Compensation of roundness deviations from machining by inhomogeneous nozzle field quenching

During the work of the Collaborative Research Center “Distortion Engineering”, different approaches for the calculation of distortion compensation by asymmetric gas quenching were tested. The basic task was to find a model which determines the gas flow of the 12 available nozzle columns in circumferential direction (Figure 11, left) depending on the 2nd and 3rd order coefficients of the roundness plots measured after machining respectively after austenitising. Lütjens et al. developed finally a model that calculates the necessary gas flow distribution m · (φj) for the 12 nozzle rows j = 1, … 12 around the ring [31]. The parameters of this model were determined by a pre-production series that consisted of 11 tests. Based on the parameter estimation, the “production” was started. By use of these additional results, the model parameters were improved iteratively. Figure 18 shows the shape changes in the complex plane. The average value of ovality was reduced from 37 to 20 μm and in the 3rd order even an improvement was reached from 36 to 12 μm. Figure 19 shows the results from the viewpoint of practice. Here, the cost for rework depends on the roundness deviation. It can clearly be seen that average roundness and its scattering are considerably reduced [31].

Fig. 18 Left: results of the compensation by inhomogeneous quenching: 2nd and right: 3rd order Fourier coefficient before and after heat treatment [31]
Bild 18. Links: Ergebnisse der Kompensation durch inhomogenes Abschrecken: Fourier-Koeffizient 2. und rechts: 3. Ordnung vor und nach der Wärmebehandlung [31]

Fig. 18

Left: results of the compensation by inhomogeneous quenching: 2nd and right: 3rd order Fourier coefficient before and after heat treatment [31]

Bild 18. Links: Ergebnisse der Kompensation durch inhomogenes Abschrecken: Fourier-Koeffizient 2. und rechts: 3. Ordnung vor und nach der Wärmebehandlung [31]

Fig. 19 Influence of compensation by inhomogeneous gas nozzle field quenching on the cumulative distribution of roundness deviation [31]
Bild 19. Einfluss der Kompensation durch inhomogene Gasdüsenfeldabschreckung auf die kumulative Verteilung der Rundheitsabweichung [31]

Fig. 19

Influence of compensation by inhomogeneous gas nozzle field quenching on the cumulative distribution of roundness deviation [31]

Bild 19. Einfluss der Kompensation durch inhomogene Gasdüsenfeldabschreckung auf die kumulative Verteilung der Rundheitsabweichung [31]

3.3.3 Ring – Compensation of roundness deviations from machining by quenching in fixtures

For thin-walled ring-shaped bodies or components with an extreme asymmetric mass distribution (for example crown wheels) it could be unavoidable to quench them in fixtures [32]. In such devices external loads are acting on the component during quenching. By this concept shape changes like out of roundness or flatness can be compensated by the superposition of different carriers of distortion potential. In the simplest case an asymmetric mass distribution by design and the stress distribution generated by the fixture acts together. In a more complicated situation distortion and therefore an asymmetric mass distribution was generated during heating as consequence of inhomogeneous residual stresses (for instance bearing rings). During quenching the distorted component shrinks and the contact to the mandrel starts at the circumferential angle with the smallest diameter. With ongoing contraction more and more regions of the components see increasing stresses. The correction of out of roundness is at first pure elastic. Depending on the combination of dimensions, out of roundness, quenching conditions, and transformation behavior yielding can start locally and at the latest when transformation starts transformation plasticity will participate to straightening.

Furthermore, it is principally possible to compensate dimensional fluctuations. Up to now this attempt was only tested for thinwalled bearing rings made from SAE 52100 [33]. For such a system an in-process measurement of the inner diameter and an expanding mandrel are necessary. Figure 20 shows a test quenching press with such equipment.

Fig. 20 Left: test quenching press of Leibniz-IWT, right, bottom: quenching tool for rings with the dimensions ro = 75 mm, ri = 69 mm, H = 25 mm and sensor for in-process radius measurement [32, 33, 34]
Bild 20. Links: Versuchshärtepresse des Leibniz-IWT, rechts, unten: Abschreckwerkzeug für Ringe mit den Abmessungen ro = 75 mm, ri = 69 mm, H = 25 mm und Sensor zur In-Prozess-Radiusmessung [32, 33, 34]

Fig. 20

Left: test quenching press of Leibniz-IWT, right, bottom: quenching tool for rings with the dimensions ro = 75 mm, ri = 69 mm, H = 25 mm and sensor for in-process radius measurement [32, 33, 34]

Bild 20. Links: Versuchshärtepresse des Leibniz-IWT, rechts, unten: Abschreckwerkzeug für Ringe mit den Abmessungen ro = 75 mm, ri = 69 mm, H = 25 mm und Sensor zur In-Prozess-Radiusmessung [32, 33, 34]

By such a system, the influence of straightening strokes acting at different times and with different amplitudes can be investigated. Figure 21 shows such measurements for straightening processes that start and end before start of quenching. In this case only yielding acts and it can clearly be seen that an increasing straightening stroke results in increasing diameter changes and a pretty good out of roundness. The Fourier spectrum of this plot contains a small second order and a smaller amplitude for the 36th order. This periodicity can clearly be seen in the roundness plot and results from the mandrel with 36 contact areas (Fig. 21).

Fig. 21 Left: straightening of rings (ro = 75 mm, ri = 69 mm, H = 25 mm) with increasing straightening strokes in the austenitic stage: Change of inner diameter during cooling in the quenching press and right: typical out of roundness plot [32, 33, 35]
Bild. 21. Links: Richten von Ringen (ro = 75 mm, ri = 69 mm, H = 25 mm) mit zunehmenden Richthüben im austenitischen Stadium: Änderung des Innendurchmessers während der Abkühlung in der Härtepresse und rechts: typischer Rundheitsschrieb [32, 33, 35]

Fig. 21

Left: straightening of rings (ro = 75 mm, ri = 69 mm, H = 25 mm) with increasing straightening strokes in the austenitic stage: Change of inner diameter during cooling in the quenching press and right: typical out of roundness plot [32, 33, 35]

Bild. 21. Links: Richten von Ringen (ro = 75 mm, ri = 69 mm, H = 25 mm) mit zunehmenden Richthüben im austenitischen Stadium: Änderung des Innendurchmessers während der Abkühlung in der Härtepresse und rechts: typischer Rundheitsschrieb [32, 33, 35]

Figure 22 shows the diameter development for straightening operations during martensite formation. Here the plastic deformations should come mainly from transformation plasticity because the yield limit increases with decreasing temperature. But the out of roundness is significantly enlarged. At first a 4th order can clearly be identified in the plot. Additionally, the 36th Fourier coefficient is drastically enlarged, too.

Fig. 22 Left: straightening of rings (ro = 75 mm, ri = 69 mm, H = 25 mm) with increasing straightening strokes during martensite formation: Change of inner diameter during cooling in the quenching press and right: typical out of roundness plot [32, 33, 35]
Bild 22. Links: Richten von Ringen (ro = 75 mm, ri = 69 mm, H = 25 mm) mit zunehmenden Richthüben während der Martensitbildung: Änderung des Innendurchmessers während der Abkühlung in der Härtepresse und rechts: typischer Rundheitsschrieb [32, 33, 35]

Fig. 22

Left: straightening of rings (ro = 75 mm, ri = 69 mm, H = 25 mm) with increasing straightening strokes during martensite formation: Change of inner diameter during cooling in the quenching press and right: typical out of roundness plot [32, 33, 35]

Bild 22. Links: Richten von Ringen (ro = 75 mm, ri = 69 mm, H = 25 mm) mit zunehmenden Richthüben während der Martensitbildung: Änderung des Innendurchmessers während der Abkühlung in der Härtepresse und rechts: typischer Rundheitsschrieb [32, 33, 35]

At the beginning the 4th order was not explainable. It was assumed that segregations could have an influence. But then temperature measurement at different positions were made (Fig. 23). The result was unexpected but clear: The mean local cooling rate depends on the circumferential angle and can clearly be correlated to the four angles of oil supplies. With this result the explanation was obvious:

Fig. 23 Left, top: roundness plot of a ring (ro = 75 mm, ri = 69 mm, H = 25 mm) straightened during martensite formation, right: positions of quenching oil supplies in the tool, and left, bottom: mean cooling rates in the surrounding of an oil supply [32, 35]
Bild 23. Links oben: Rundheitsschrieb eines während der Martensitbildung gerichteten Ringes (ro = 75 mm, ri = 69 mm, H = 25 mm), rechts: Positionen von Abschreckölzuführungen im Werkzeug und links unten: mittlere Abkühlraten in der Umgebung einer Ölzuführung [32, 35]

Fig. 23

Left, top: roundness plot of a ring (ro = 75 mm, ri = 69 mm, H = 25 mm) straightened during martensite formation, right: positions of quenching oil supplies in the tool, and left, bottom: mean cooling rates in the surrounding of an oil supply [32, 35]

Bild 23. Links oben: Rundheitsschrieb eines während der Martensitbildung gerichteten Ringes (ro = 75 mm, ri = 69 mm, H = 25 mm), rechts: Positionen von Abschreckölzuführungen im Werkzeug und links unten: mittlere Abkühlraten in der Umgebung einer Ölzuführung [32, 35]

At the position of the supplies the quenching oil flows in a ring-shaped distributer channel (for the mentioned ring dimensions it is the channel in the middle in Figure 23, right picture). Above this component the quenching tool itself (Figure 20) will be mounted and the oil gets through small bores to the ring. The height of the distributer channel was not large enough to homogenise the oil flow velocity in circumferential direction. In consequence, the oil velocity directly at the outlet into the channel is larger than in the neighborhood. After passing through the bores this velocity distribution is not homogenised and therefore a position dependent HTC and consequently a position dependent mean cooling rate results at the ring. When the straightening starts, martensite formation has started at the positions of the inlets. Therefore, at these angles transformation plasticity occurs whereas at the remaining ring only elastic deformations were produced. The final result of this inhomogeneous plasticity formation can be seen in Figure 23.

3.3.4 Light weight gear base bodies – Compensation of asymmetrical mass distribution by design rules

On the basis of economic and ecological constraints, a reduced weight and/or minimised volume of automobile components is more and more focused in industrial and scientific activities in recent years. Apart from the application of new materials with considerably lower density, a change of component design can be used to succeed in aims regarding lightweight construction. However, aspects of a production-oriented design, especially for heat treated drive train components, have to be considered as well. This topic applies in particular to the final heat treatment because serious distortion problems can arise due to reduced stiffness and asymmetric mass distribution of a component. To analyse this problem, gear base bodies with reduced thickness of web and gear rim were case-hardened with low-pressure carburisation with subsequent gas quenching or gas carburisation with oil quenching. Different combinations of web thickness, web position and web orientation were investigated [36]. Figure 24 shows some selected results. It can clearly be seen that with these reduced dimensions of web thickness and gear rim thickness, there is a very high sensitivity of the gear rim distortion for the orientation and position of the web. In addition, this distortion is clearly amplified by the quenching intensity: the changes in radius are significantly higher for oil quenching.

Fig. 24 Left: changes of outer radius versus position in axial direction for HPGQ and right: oil quenching [32]

Bild 24. Links: Änderungen des Außenradius versus Position in axialer Richtung für HDGA und rechts: Ölabschreckung [32]

Fig. 24

Left: changes of outer radius versus position in axial direction for HPGQ and right: oil quenching [32]

Bild 24. Links: Änderungen des Außenradius versus Position in axialer Richtung für HDGA und rechts: Ölabschreckung [32]

With these results, the question arose as to whether there are suitable combinations of the dimensions of the gear rim thickness and web thickness as well as the web position that lead to tolerable distortions of the gear rim. In a first step, the distortion of the gear rim was mathematically separated into a tilting component and a crowning component. For the further considerations, only the tilt angle was used, which in many critical cases represents the predominant distortion part (see Fig. 24). In the second step, the heat transfer distribution and the transformation behaviour of the underlying steel melt were determined through elaborate series of measurements and integrated into a FEM-based simulation model [37].

After validation of the model, the tilt angle was simulated for many different combinations of the relevant dimensions using the method “Design of Experiment” (DOE). By use of a regression model, iso lines of the tilt angle were determined in the third step. Figure 25 shows such lines as function of web thickness and web position for a gear rim thickness of 5 mm in combination with oil quenching and the size class personal car. This diagram shows, for example, combinations of web thickness and web positions that lead to tilt angles of 0°.

Fig. 25 Numerically established iso lines for gear rim tilting in ° (gear rim thickness 5 mm, case hardening by gas carburising and oil quenching, size class personal car) [33]
Bild 25. Numerisch ermittelte Iso-Linien für die Zahnkranzkippung in ° (Zahnkranzdicke 5 mm, Einsatzhärtung durch Gasaufkohlung und Ölabschreckung, Größenklasse PKW) [33]

Fig. 25

Numerically established iso lines for gear rim tilting in ° (gear rim thickness 5 mm, case hardening by gas carburising and oil quenching, size class personal car) [33]

Bild 25. Numerisch ermittelte Iso-Linien für die Zahnkranzkippung in ° (Zahnkranzdicke 5 mm, Einsatzhärtung durch Gasaufkohlung und Ölabschreckung, Größenklasse PKW) [33]

With this approach, tolerable distortions for light-weight gears with volume reduction can be produced through a clever design of the distortion potential carrier “mass distribution”. However, Figure 25 also shows, that lightweight construction and reduction of construction space cannot be achieved independently of each other and that considering distortion potential is crucial for the design process in both cases.

4 Conclusions

After a brief presentation of the fundamentals of distortion generation and Distortion Engineering, a total of ten examples were used to demonstrate the complex relationships between the carrier of distortion potential “temperature distribution” during quenching and the dimensional and shape changes of various components. The following points can be concluded:

  • The quenching process generally holds a great distortion potential.

  • There are approaches to keep the dimensional and shape changes within limits despite this great potential.

  • These approaches concern the choice of a suitable quenching medium and/or a suitable charge, ranging from multi-layer to single-layer to single-part.

  • Transformation plasticity plays an important role in the hardening of thin-walled rings.

  • When manufacturing thin-walled rolling bearing rings, low Fourier orders in the distortion potential carriers in particular must be avoided.

  • Quenches with extremely large heat transfer can at least partially compensate for asymmetries in other distortion potential carriers.

  • Even in a quenching fixture lower order Fourier coefficients in the resulting component temperature distribution, and therefore in the quenching process, must be avoided.

  • In the case of light weight gears, a limited increase of the web dimension can compensate for the effects of an asymmetrical mass distribution. However, this still requires the development of corresponding design guidelines.

  • In principle, specifically inhomogeneous quenching processes can be used to reduce shape deviations from previous processes.

1 Einleitung

Es ist weltweit bekannt, dass Maß- und Formänderungen an Bauteilen, die in vielen Fällen erst nach der Wärmebehandlung sichtbar werden, zu sehr hohen Kosten durch Nacharbeit oder Ausschuss führen. Es ist aber auch bekannt, dass nicht nur die Wärmebehandlung für diese Maß- und Formänderungen verantwortlich ist. Vielmehr sind die Ursachen in jedem einzelnen Prozess der Fertigungskette inclusive der Konstruktion zu finden. Basierend auf diesen Erkenntnissen wurde im Jahr 2001 auf Initiative von Prof. Peter Mayr der Sonderforschungsbereich „Distortion Engineering – Verzugsbeherrschung in der Fertigung“ eingerichtet. Unter seiner Leitung und der seines Nachfolgers Prof. Hans-Werner Zoch wurden in der Zeit von 2001 bis 2011 eine Fülle von grundlegenden Arbeiten zur Verzugsentstehung und -beherrschung durchgeführt, die in mehr als 400 Publikationen der Wissenschaft und Industrie zugänglich gemacht wurden.

Stellvertretend dafür sollen hier zwei Arbeiten genannt werden, die erste Überlegungen zum Distortion Engineering [17] und einen Überblick über die erzielten Ergebnisse [19] darstellen.

Entsprechend dem Titel der 2nd International Conference on Quenching and Distortion Engineering soll hier nur auf den Abschreckvorgang und dessen Einfluss auf den Verzug eingegangen werden. Darüber hinaus soll auf einige Veröffentlichungen verwiesen werden, die sich mit anderen Prozessen und anderen Verzugsquellen befasst haben und hervorragende Übersichten präsentieren: [1, 2, 3, 4].

Das Abschrecken birgt ein großes Risiko von Maß- und Formveränderungen. Dies liegt daran, dass die kritische Abkühlgeschwindigkeit des jeweiligen Werkstoffs überschritten werden muss, um die geforderten Härtewerte zu erreichen. Abhängig vom Abschreckmedium, den Abmessungen und dem Werkstoff des Bauteils kann diese Anforderung zu großen Temperaturgradienten führen, die wiederum thermische Spannungen erzeugen. Dies ist die Grundlage für Verformungen und Verzug. Ein zweiter Aspekt ist im Allgemeinen die Minimierung der Kosten. Konventionell wird dies dadurch erreicht, dass der Ofen mit möglichst vielen Teilen gefüllt wird. Typischerweise besteht eine solche Charge aus vielen Lagen, deren Anzahl von den Abmessungen der Heizkammer abhängt. Dies hat zur Folge, dass die Inhomogenität der Abkühlraten im gesamten Chargenvolumen viel größer ist als bei einem einzelnen Bauteil. Dies wiederum kann eine Grundlage für die Verzugsentstehung und große Streuungen der Maß- und Formänderungen sein. Weitere verzugsrelevante Aspekte des Abschreckens wurden in den QDE-Beiträgen von Eva Troell [5] und Scott Mackenzie [6] dargestellt. Darüber hinaus wird 2022 die zweite Auflage des „Handbook of Quenchants and Quenching Techniques“ der ASM erscheinen, die ein Kapitel mit vielen weiteren Beispielen zum Thema Abschrecken und Verzug enthält [7].

Im Folgenden wird eine kurze Zusammenfassung der Grundlagen der Verzugsentstehung vorgestellt. Weitere Details finden sich z. B. in [8] und [9]. Die Mechanismen und das Verzugspotential mit seinen Trägern werden näher erläutert und die Methode des Distortion Engineering wird erklärt. Abschließend werden ausgewählte Beispiele vorgestellt, die die Zusammenhänge zwischen Maß- und Formänderungen und dem Abschreckprozess verdeutlichen.

1.1 Mechanismen

Maß- und Formänderungen können durch Volumenänderungen oder Verformungen hervorgerufen werden (Bild 1). Solche Änderungen können durch verschiedene Prozesse in einem Bauteil hervorgerufen werden.

1.1.1 Volumenänderungen

Volumenänderungen resultieren im Prinzip aus Dichte- und Massenänderungen. Letzterer Fall tritt bei jeder thermochemischen Behandlung auf, da im Zuge dieses Prozessschrittes zusätzliche Atome in den oberflächennahen Bereich eingebracht werden. Natürlich tragen auch ungewollte Veränderungen wie Randschichtoxidation oder Entkohlung zu diesem Effekt bei. Diese gewollten oder ungewollten Randschichtveränderungen führen in der Regel neben der Massenänderung auch zu Dichteänderungen. Die Dichte wird aber auch durch Phasenumwandlungen und Ausscheidungsprozesse beeinflusst, die wiederum von der chemischen Zusammensetzung und dem durchlaufenen Temperatur-Zeit-Verlauf bestimmt werden. Darüber hinaus können auch Spannungen einen Einfluss auf das Umwandlungsverhalten haben [10].

Bild 2 zeigt die Abhängigkeit der reziproken Dichte – des spezifischen Volumens – vom Gehalt an gelöstem Kohlenstoff [12]. Dieses Diagramm von Lement basiert auf röntgenographischen Messungen der Gitterkonstanten. Beispielsweise benötigt Austenit das kleinste Volumen pro Masseneinheit und hat somit die höchste Dichte. Phasengemische aus Ferrit und Zementit sowie Martensit benötigen mehr Volumen. Mit zunehmendem Kohlenstoffgehalt steigt das spezifische Volumen für alle genannten Phasen annähernd linear an. Die Differenz zwischen den Kurven für Ferrit + Zementit und Martensit nimmt mit steigendem Kohlenstoffgehalt deutlich zu. Dasselbe gilt für die Volumenänderung eines Bauteils nach martensitischer Härtung, das im Ausgangszustand aus Ferrit und Zementit bestand. Es wird deutlich, dass die Volumenänderungen vom End- und Ausgangsgefüge abhängen. Die sich daraus ergebenden Volumenänderungen können mithilfe von Bild 2 oder durch Verwendung der in [12] angegebenen Formeln abgeschätzt werden.

1.1.2 Verformungen

Verformungen, die zum Verzug beitragen, können in plastische und elastische Verformungen unterteilt werden. Die für die Maß- und Formänderungen relevanten elastischen Verformungen sind wärmebehandlungsbedingt. Sie treten bei der Wärmebehandlung selbst auf und werden durch die Eigenspannungen des Bauteils verursacht (Bild 1). Jede Änderung des Eigenspannungszustandes des fertigen Bauteils führt zwangsläufig zu Änderungen der elastischen Verformungen und damit zu Maß- und Formänderungen.

Dies kann z. B. durch thermische oder mechanische Belastungen während der Nutzung des Bauteils verursacht werden. Auch mechanische Beeinflussungen des Spannungsgleichgewichts, z. B. durch lokale Abtragsprozesse, können zu Verformungen führen.

Spannungen sind notwendig, um plastische Verformungen zu erzeugen. Diese können mehrere Ursachen haben. Zum einen können es thermische und Umwandlungsspannungen sein, wie sie bei vielen Wärmebehandlungsprozessen aufgrund von thermischen oder thermisch-chemischen Gradienten auftreten. Zum anderen können Lastspannungen zu Maß- und Formänderungen führen. Ein Beispiel dafür sind Abschreckvorrichtungen, die zur gezielten Erzeugung von Richtkräften beim Abschrecken bestimmter Bauteilgruppen wie Synchronringe, Schiebemuffen, Kupplungskörper und Zahnkränze eingesetzt werden [13]. Dabei darf nicht vergessen werden, dass das Eigengewicht des Bauteils als Lastspannung wirkt. Insbesondere bei dünnwandigen Bauteilen können hier bei fehlender mechanischer Abstützung oder in Kombination mit Reibung zwischen Bauteil und Auflage, vor allem bei mehrlagiger Chargierung, Lastspannungen in kritischer Höhe entstehen.

Eigenspannungen, die aus den Prozessen vor der Wärmebehandlung stammen, haben die gleiche Wirkung wie die oben erwähnten Eigenspannungen nach der Wärmebehandlung. Der Unterschied besteht darin, dass bei der Wärmebehandlung die Temperaturen zwangsläufig höher sind als im Gebrauch. Dies kann dementsprechend zu deutlich größeren Maß- und Formänderungen führen. Einzelheiten zu diesem und dem vorherigen Aspekt werden von Surm [14] am Beispiel der Herstellung von Lagerringen dargestellt.

Plastische Verformungen können durch Spannungen über verschiedene Mechanismen hervorgerufen werden: durch Überschreiten der Fließgrenze, durch Kriechvorgänge (Bild 3) oder durch Umwandlungsplastizität (Bild 4). Der erste Mechanismus erfordert eine Mindestspannung, die größer als die lokale Fließgrenze ist. Dieser Wert hängt unter anderem von der Temperatur ab (Bild 3, links). Bei niedrigen Temperaturen können vergleichsweise große Spannungen elastisch toleriert werden. Mit steigender Temperatur nimmt dieser Widerstand gegen plastische Verformung jedoch immer mehr ab, bis hin zu nur noch wenigen zehn MPa bei üblichen Haltetemperaturen. Außerdem findet bei diesen Temperaturen nur eine geringe Verfestigung statt, sodass kleine Überschreitungen der Streckgrenze zu großen plastischen Verformungen führen können: z. B. reichen bei 700 °C 65 MPa aus, um eine plastische Verformung von 0,2 % zu erzeugen (Bild 3, links).

Der zweite verzugsrelevante Plastizitätsmechanismus – das Kriechen – erfordert keine Mindestspannung. Er wird vor allem bei höheren Temperaturen beobachtet und ist ein zeitabhängiger Effekt (Bild 3, rechts). Schon bei einer sehr moderaten Spannung von 5 MPa wird nach einer Stunde bei einer für die Aufkohlung üblichen Temperatur von 940 °C eine plastische Verformung von 0,2 % festgestellt. Zudem sind die Aufkohlungszeiten in der Regel deutlich länger.

Die Umwandlungsplastizität erfordert ebenfalls keine Mindestspannung für die plastische Verformung. Das transformationsplastische Dehnungsinkrement ist proportional zum Spannungs Deviator und tritt immer dann auf, wenn ein Umwandlungsprozess und eine nicht-hydrostatische Spannung gleichzeitig auftreten [16]. Dabei spielt es keine Rolle, ob sich Austenit oder eine ferritische Phase bildet. Bild 4 zeigt Dilatometerkurven für die Bildung von Martensit beim 42CrMo4. Es ist zu erkennen, dass eine kurz vor Beginn der Umwandlung aufgebrachte Spannung zu deutlichen Veränderungen im Vergleich zur spannungsfreien Kurve führt. Für die Martensitbildung beim 42CrMo4 ergab die Proportionalitätskonstante einen Wert von 4,2 × 10-5 mm2/N. Das bedeutet, dass in diesem Fall bei einer Spannung von 50 MPa eine umwandlungsplastische Dehnung von 0,2 % nach abgeschlossener Umwandlung resultiert.

1.2 Verzugspotenzial

Die bisherigen Betrachtungen waren allgemeiner Natur und im Wesentlichen unabhängig von den Fertigungsverfahren. Im Folgenden werden die für die Verzugsentstehung maßgeblichen Größen vorgestellt. Der Text ist teilweise aus [7] zitiert.

Bei der Betrachtung des Tellerrads in Bild 5 fällt sofort auf, dass im Bereich der Verzahnung deutlich weniger Masse vorhanden ist als im unteren Bereich. Außerdem ergibt sich durch die Verzahnung eine deutlich größere Oberfläche als für den Grundkörper des Tellerrads. Aus diesen Tatsachen folgt unmittelbar, dass der Verzahnungsbereich bei einem Abschreckvorgang deutlich schneller abkühlt. Die daraus resultierenden Wärmedehnungen sind zudem asymmetrisch verteilt (oben/unten) und führen zu Spannungen, die das Tellerrad verkippen lassen. Der Grund für diese Formveränderung ist die Asymmetrie der Massenverteilung des Tellerrads. Die Geometrie muss daher als Einflussfaktor für das Verzugspotenzial betrachtet werden.

Im zweiten Beispiel in Bild 5 war die Kugel nach dem Härten nicht mehr kugelförmig, sondern ellipsoidisch. Nach dem Schneiden in Richtung der extremen Radiusänderung wurde eine inhomogene, asymmetrische Verteilung des Gefüges beobachtet. Diese Asymmetrie resultiert aus einer asymmetrischen Verteilung der chemischen Zusammensetzung, die als Seigerung bezeichnet wird. Diese beiden Verteilungen führen zu komplexen Wechselwirkungen während der Wärmebehandlung. Die Unterschiede im Gefüge führen zu lokalen Unterschieden in der Volumenänderung während der Austenitisierung und damit zu Umwandlungsspannungen. Darüber hinaus bewirken die Unterschiede in der chemischen Zusammensetzung ein positionsabhängiges Umwandlungsverhalten und damit komplexe Verteilungen der Spannungs- und Dehnungsentwicklung.

Der Ring im dritten Beispiel von Bild 5 zeigte nach der Wärmebehandlung eine große Amplitude dritter Ordnung im Fourier-Spektrum seines Rundheitsschriebs (Dreieckigkeit). Die durch Röntgenbeugung gemessene Verteilung der Eigenspannungen nach der Bearbeitung zeigte eine ähnliche Dreiecksform wie die Rundheitskurve nach der Wärmebehandlung. Sie resultiert aus dem Zusammenspiel von Spannen und Drehen während des Bearbeitungsprozesses. Beim Erwärmen werden diese Spannungen durch plastische Verformung abgebaut, was zu den daraus resultierenden Maß- und Formänderungen führt.

Aus diesen Beispielen lässt sich schließen, dass nicht nur die sichtbare Asymmetrie der Massenverteilung Verzug verursacht. Auch die unsichtbaren Asymmetrien oder Inhomogenitäten anderer Eigenschaften können aufgrund komplexer Wechselwirkungen während der Wärmebehandlung zu Verzug führen. Enthält ein Bauteil solche Asymmetrien, enthält es ein Potenzial für die Entstehung von Verzügen, das bei der Wärmebehandlung freigesetzt wird und die messbaren Maß- und Formänderungen verursacht. Dieses Potenzial wird als „Verzugspotenzial“ eines Bauteils bezeichnet und ist nicht messbar. Messbare Größen sind die sogenannten Träger des Verzugspotenzials. Diese Träger sind die Verteilungen

  • der Masse (Geometrie),

  • der relevanten Legierungselemente,

  • des Gefüges einschließlich der Korngröße,

  • der Spannungen (Eigenspannungen),

  • der mechanische Vorgeschichte und

  • der Temperatur

im gesamten Volumen des betrachteten Bauteils.

Die mechanische Vorgeschichte berücksichtigt in erster Linie den Einfluss der plastischen Verformungen auf nach der Plastifizierung auftretende Effekte. Ein Beispiel ist das Verfestigungsverhalten (Bauschinger-Effekt). Hier werden kinematisches oder isotropes Verhalten oder Mischungen davon diskutiert. Weitere Einzelheiten sind an anderer Stelle zu finden (z. B. [18]). Bei Umformprozessen treten sehr hohe Verformungsgrade auf. In diesem Fall müssen mechanisch induzierte Rekristallisationseffekte berücksichtigt werden. Schließlich kann auch die mechanische Vorgeschichte einen Einfluss auf das Umformverhalten haben.

Die sehr wichtige Rolle der thermischen Ausdehnungen, die sich aus der Temperaturverteilung ergeben, wurde bereits bei der Diskussion des Tellerradverzugs kurz angesprochen. Die Temperaturverteilung kann aber auch Asymmetrien oder Inhomogenitäten aufgrund der Wärmeübergangsbedingungen aufweisen, die den geometrisch bedingten Abweichungen von der Homogenität überlagert sind.

Aus der Sicht der Prozesskettensimulation sind diese Träger – mit Ausnahme der Geometrie – die Verteilungen der Zustandsgrößen am Ende eines Prozesses innerhalb der Fertigungskette und müssen als Anfangsbedingungen für die Simulation des nächsten Prozesses angegeben werden. Um jedoch den Ursprung der Verformung zu verstehen, müssen die Wechselwirkungen der Zustandsgrößen während der Prozesse analysiert werden.

Abschließend muss festgestellt werden, dass Verzug nicht nur ein Problem der Wärmebehandlung ist. Veränderungen bei den Trägern des Verzugspotenzials können auf jeder Stufe der Fertigungskette auftreten. Daher ist Verzug eine Systemeigenschaft und die Beherrschung des Verzuges in Fertigungsprozessen muss einem systemorientierten Ansatz folgen. Das relevante System ist hier die gesamte Fertigungskette!

2 Distortion Engineering

Für den Umgang mit Verzugsproblemen wurde eine dreistufige Strategie namens „Distortion Engineering“ entwickelt [19]. Diese Methodik, die stets die gesamte Prozesskette berücksichtigt, besteht aus drei Untersuchungsebenen (Bild 6). Auf Ebene 1 müssen die Parameter und Variablen, die den Verzug in jedem Fertigungsschritt beeinflussen, identifiziert (siehe Abschnitt 3.1) und analysiert werden. Im Allgemeinen kann eine große Anzahl von Parametern von Bedeutung sein. Daher sollten Techniken der Versuchsplanung (Design of Experiment, DoE) angewandt werden, die die experimentelle Untersuchung einer größeren Anzahl von Parametern mit einer begrenzten Anzahl von Versuchen ermöglichen, und sowohl die Haupteinflussgrößen als auch relevante Wechselwirkungen ermittelt werden können.

Nach der Ermittlung der wichtigsten Einflussparameter konzentriert sich Stufe 2 auf das Verständnis der Verzugsmechanismen unter Verwendung des Konzepts des Verzugspotenzials und seiner Träger (siehe Abschnitt 3.2). Modellierung und Simulation sind hilfreiche, in vielen Fällen sogar notwendige Werkzeuge, um die Mechanismen der Verzugsentstehung vollständig zu verstehen. Das Verständnis der Mechanismen ermöglicht in vielen Fällen bereits eine Reduzierung der Maß- und Formänderungen.

Distortion Engineering zielt darauf ab, Verzüge zu kompensieren, indem das sogenannte „Kompensationspotenzial“ (Stufe 3) genutzt wird. Dieser Ansatz nutzt einerseits konventionelle Methoden, um die Homogenität bzw. die Symmetrie der Träger des Verzugspotentials zu erhöhen. Andererseits können gezielt eingebrachte zusätzliche Inhomogenitäten/Asymmetrien in eine oder mehrere der Verteilungen der Träger genutzt werden, um die aus den unvermeidlichen Asymmetrien resultierenden Maß- und Formänderungen zu kompensieren. Zum Beispiel kann ein inhomogener Abschreckprozess genutzt werden, um Formänderungen aus dem vorangegangenen Herstellungsprozess zu kompensieren (siehe Abschnitt 3.2.2). Eine Kompensation ist prinzipiell auch für einzelne Bauteile möglich. In diesem Zusammenhang können prozessbegleitende Mess- und Regeltechniken von großer Bedeutung sein [8].

3 Einfluss von Abschreckprozessen auf den Verzug – Beispiele

In diesem Abschnitt werden ausgewählte Beispiele vorgestellt, die die Zusammenhänge zwischen Verzug und dem Abschreckprozess verdeutlichen. Die Beispiele wurden so gewählt, dass sie alle Level des Distortion Engineering abdecken. Weitere Beispiele sind in der 2. Auflage des „Handbook of Quenchants and Quenching Techniques“ [7] enthalten. Die folgenden Beispiele sind teilweise aus diesem Buch zitiert.

3.1 Beispiele für Level 1: Parameter und Variablen

3.1.1 Ring – Einfluss des Abschreckmediums:Öl versus Hochdruck-Gasabschreckung (HDGA)

Lagerringe aus 100Cr6 mit unterschiedlichen Verhältnissen von Durchmesser zu Wandstärke (11,2; 12,0; 20) und Volumen zu Oberfläche (3,6 mm; 4,0 mm; 2,6 mm) (Bild 7, links) wurden abgeschreckt in

  • einem Zweikammer-Ofen mit einem Hochgeschwindigkeits-Abschrecköl bei 60 °C

  • einem Zweikammer-Vakuumofen mit Helium bei einem Druck von 20 bar

In beiden Fällen bestanden die Chargen aus jeweils neun Lagen mit so vielen Ringen wie möglich (z. B. acht Teile für Ringtyp 7, Bild 7, rechts).

Die Ringe wurden vor und nach dem Härten vermessen und Änderungen von Durchmesser, Unrundheit und Konizität bestimmt. Bild 8 zeigt beispielhaft die Konizität des Ringtyps 7. In allen Lagen führt das Gasabschrecken zu positiven Werten dieser Formveränderung. Das bedeutet, dass die Ringe nach dem Abschrecken am oberen Ende einen kleineren Durchmesser haben als am unteren Ende. Außerdem ist keine signifikante Lagenabhängigkeit zu beobachten. Bei ölabgeschreckten Ringen hängt die Konizität stark von der Lagennummer ab. Hier gibt es einen klaren Trend von negativen zu positiven Werten mit zunehmender Lagennummer. Außerdem ist die Streuung der Konizität pro Lage in den meisten Fällen größer als bei der Hochdruckgasabschreckung.

Eine Zusammenfassung aller Ergebnisse dieser Untersuchungen findet sich in Tabelle 1. Die Differenz zwischen Maximal- und Minimalwert (Spannweite) ist in allen Fällen nach HDGA deutlich geringer. Das Gleiche gilt für die Mittelwerte von Durchmesser und Rundheit. Nur die absoluten Mittelwerte der Konizität sind bei der Ölabschreckung kleiner. Der Grund für dieses Ergebnis ist eine geringere Streuung der Abkühlkurven sowohl in Umfangsrichtung jedes einzelnen Rings als auch über die gesamte Charge zu sehen.

3.1.2 Gewichtsreduziertes Zahnrad – Einfluss des Abschreckmediums: Öl versus Salzbad versus HPGQ

In dieser Studie [21] wurde das Verzugsverhalten von massereduzierten Vorgelegerädern (Bild 9, links) analysiert. Unter anderem wurde der Einfluss des Abschreckmediums auf die Radiusänderung am Zahnkopf ermittelt. Die Abschreckung erfolgte in einem Hochleistungsabschrecköl (Durixol W72), in einem Salzbad (AS140) und mit Helium unter 18 bar und einer Strömungsrichtung von oben nach unten. Je fünf Bauteile wurden vor und nach der Wärmebehandlung gemessen. Bild 9, rechts, zeigt die resultierenden Radiusänderungen entlang des Zahnkopfes. Bei Ölabschreckung sind diese Änderungen vollkommen linear über z. Dies entspricht einer reinen Verkippung. Bei der HDGA liegen die Messwerte auf einer fast perfekten Parabel, der nur eine leichte Verkippung überlagert ist. Die Salzabschreckung führt zu Radiusänderungen, die eine Mischung aus den beiden vorgenannten Fällen darstellen. Die Gründe für diese Ergebnisse sind bisher noch nicht geklärt worden. Eine reine Verkippung und eine reine Maßänderung nach der Ölabschreckung kann jedoch durch eine Anpassung der Verzahnungsmaße kompensiert werden. Außerdem führt das Abschrecken im Salzbad und HDGA zu akzeptablen Maß- und Formänderungen, sodass dieser Verzug wahrscheinlich tolerierbar ist.

3.1.3 Tellerrad – Einfluss des Abschreckmediums und der Chargierung: Chargenabschreckung in Öl versus Einzelteilabschreckung mit HDGA

Eine zusätzliche Reduzierung des Verzugspotenzials ist durch die Düsenfeld-Gasabschreckung möglich. Bei dieser Technik wird ein Abschreckwerkzeug verwendet, das für eine bestimmte Geometrie maßgeschneidert ist. Parameter des Tailoring-Prozesses sind Anzahl, Position und Ausrichtung der Düsen. Außerdem müssen der Druck und der Gesamtdurchfluss für das gesamte Düsenfeld gewählt werden. Es kann notwendig sein, Gruppen von Düsen zu definieren und jede Gruppe mit unterschiedlichen Durchflussraten zu versehen. Diese Parameter müssen festgelegt werden, um erstens die gewünschten Härteverteilungen zu erreichen. Das zweite Ziel ist die Minimierung der thermischen Spannungen im Bauteil. Die Düsenfeldabschreckung führt a priori zu inhomogenen Verteilungen des zugehörigen Wärmeübergangskoeffizienten (WÜK). Daher ist eine Rotation des Bauteils eine geeignete Methode, um die Temperaturverteilung zu homogenisieren. Ein aktuelles System mit der Bezeichnung „4D Quenching Chamber“ ist in Bild 10, links dargestellt [22]. Mit diesem Abschreckwerkzeug wurden Tellerräder mit einem Außendurchmesser von 200 mm einsatzgehärtet. Zum Vergleich wurde das Abschrecken mit einer klassischen Ölabschreckung in einer Charge durchgeführt. Die Ergebnisse sind in Bild 10, rechtes Bild, zusammengefasst. Das Abschrecken im maßgeschneiderten Abschreckwerkzeug führt zu deutlich geringeren Werten der Ebenheit der Bohrungsoberseite, der Rundheitsabweichung der Bohrung und des Planlaufs der Bohrungsunterseite. Außerdem beträgt die Streuung dieser Formänderungen weniger als 50 % im Vergleich zur Ölabschreckung [22]. Diese Ergebnisse zeigen das Potenzial solcher maßgeschneiderten Abschreckwerkzeuge, auch wenn der Aufwand für die Auslegung und Durchführung von Abschreckprozessen, die auf eine bestimmte Geometrie zugeschnitten sind, im Vergleich zu konventionellen Verfahren deutlich höher ist.

3.2 Beispiele für Level 2: Träger von Verzugspotenzialen und Verzugsmechanismen

3.2.1 Ring – Einfluss der Wiederbenetzung bei der Ölabschreckung – hängend versus liegend und Öl versus Gasdüsenfeld

In diesem Beispiel wurden Ringe aus 100Cr6 mit den Abmessungen ri = 66,5 mm, ro = 72,5 mm, H = 26 mm untersucht [23]. Zentrale Frage war der Einfluss der Wiederbenetzung auf den Verzug. Die Abschreckung erfolgte in einem Hochgeschwindigkeitsabschrecköl. Die Badtemperatur betrug 60 °C und das Öl wurde umgewälzt. Es wurden horizontal und vertikal orientierte Ringe untersucht. Die horizontal ausgerichteten Ringe lagen auf zwei Arten von Auflagen: Sterne mit drei und acht Auflagelinien. Als Referenz wurden die Ringe in einem Gasdüsenfeld (Bild 11, links) unter Verwendung von Stickstoff abgeschreckt. Diese Abschreckeinrichtung ermöglicht einen inhomogenen, aber hochsymmetrischen Abschreckprozess. Weitere Einzelheiten dazu finden sich in [24]. Für jede Variante wurden sechs Ringe wärmebehandelt.

Zur Untersuchung der Wiederbenetzung wurden ergänzende Versuche in einem Laborabschreckbad durchgeführt. Die Kinetik der Wiederbenetzung wurde mit einer Videokamera aufgezeichnet.

Aus Rundheitsdiagrammen, die an der Innen- und Außenseite der Ringe vor und nach der Wärmebehandlung gemessen wurden, wurde zunächst der Mittelwert des Innen- und Außenradius berechnet. Dann wurde eine Fourier-Transformation auf diese Kurven angewandt [15]. Die Ergebnisse sind Amplitude und Phase der k-ten Ordnung ak und αk. Anhand dieser Daten können die Rundheitsschriebe durch entsprechende Fourier-Reihen beschrieben werden:

(1) R ¯ ( α ) = R i ( α ) + R o ( α ) 2 = R ¯ 0 + k = 2 a k × cos k × α + α k

R0 entspricht dem Mittelwert von R(α ). Die Amplituden ak können sehr anschaulich als Exzentrizität, Ovalität, Dreieckigkeit, ... interpretiert werden. Die Phasenlage ist von besonderer Bedeutung, da aus diesen Daten Informationen über Vorzugsrichtungen – z. B. die Ausrichtung von Seigerungslinien, Spannvorrichtungen oder die Ausrichtung in einer Charge – gewonnen werden können. Bild 11, rechtes Bild, zeigt die Unterschiede zwischen den Messungen nach und vor der Wärmebehandlung für Ovalität und Dreieckigkeit. Die besten Ergebnisse für die 2. Ordnung wurden bei horizontal angeordneten Ringen (liegend) auf einer Unterlage mit drei Linien und Ölabschreckung erzielt: der kleinste Mittelwert mit einer vergleichbaren Streuung wie bei der Gasdüsenfeldabschreckung. Die größten Ovalitätsänderungen in Kombination mit einem sehr großen Streuband wurden durch die vertikale Anordnung der Ringe erzeugt. Die Amplituden 3. Ordnung für liegende Ringe sind etwas größer als die entsprechenden Änderungen bei der Gasdüsenfeldlösung. In diesem Fall sind die größten Änderungen auch für die vertikal hängenden Ringe zu finden.

Die Änderung der Konizität für horizontal chargierte und ölgeschreckte Ringe ist negativ. Das bedeutet, dass der Ringradius bei Annäherung an die obere Stirnfläche zunimmt (Bild 12). Dies ist genau das Ergebnis, das bei großen Chargen in den unteren Schichten beobachtet wurde (Abschnitt 3.1.1). Die Anzahl der Linien der Auflage hat hier keinen messbaren Einfluss. Die vertikal in Öl bzw. im Gasdüsenfeld abgeschreckten Ringe zeigen im Mittel keine Veränderung der Konizität.

Bei ölgeschreckten Ringen hängt die Situation stark von der Orientierung des Ringes in Bezug auf den Gravitationsvektor ab. Bei horizontal chargierten Ringen entstehen durch den Wiederbenetzungsprozess große unsymmetrische Temperaturgradienten in axialer Richtung (Bild 13, links). Ist das Strömungsfeld im Abschrecktank um die innere und äußere Ringoberfläche homogen und wirken keine Störungen auf die Ringoberfläche ein, wie z. B. Zunder, dann ist das Wiederbenetzungsverhalten in Umfangsrichtung homogen. Folglich treten auch keine Temperaturgradienten in dieser Richtung auf. Mögliche Störungen des Wiederbenetzungsprozesses durch die Auflage oder durch die Haltedrähte wurden nicht beobachtet. Folglich weist ein solcher Abschreckprozess nur ein Verzugspotenzial für Konizitätsänderungen auf.

Bei der Ölabschreckung von vertikal angeordneten Ringen verläuft der Wiederbenetzungsprozess symmetrisch zur Mittelebene des Ringquerschnitts (Bild 13, rechts). Daher sind die Temperaturgradienten in axialer Richtung zwar vorhanden, aber symmetrisch. In tangentialer Richtung sind die Strömungsfelder der Flüssigkeit und des Dampfes positionsabhängig. Die Öltemperatur und auch die Dampftemperatur variieren mit zunehmendem Abstand zum unteren Ende des Rings. Außerdem erfolgt das Abfließen des Dampfes antiparallel zum Schwerkraftvektor. Diese Effekte bewirken einen inhomogenen Wärmeübergang und damit eine asymmetrische Temperaturverteilung in Umfangsrichtung. Ein solcher Abschreckungsprozess führt also nur zu einem Verzugspotential für Rundheitsänderungen.

3.2.2 Ring – Einfluss von Abschreckmedien und Umwandlungsplastizität: Gasdüsenfeld, HDGA, Salzbad und Öl

Surm et al. untersuchten den Einfluss des Abschreckprozesses auf den Ringverzug und analysierten den dafür verantwortlichen Plastizitätsmechanismus [25]. Sie verwendeten dünnwandige Ringe (ro = 72,5 mm, ri = 66,5 mm, H = 26 mm) aus 100Cr6 und X5CrNi18-10, einem austenitischen Stahl. Die Abschreckung erfolgte mittels Gasdüsenfeld (Bild 11, links), HDGA mit Gasströmungsrichtungen oben-unten und unten-oben, Öl und Salz. Aus den Rundheitsschrieben vor und nach der Wärmebehandlung wurde die Änderung der Fourier-Koeffizienten durch Fourier-Transformation bestimmt. Die Ergebnisse sind in Bild 14 dargestellt. Die durchschnittliche Radiusänderung (Fourier-Ordnung 0) für 100Cr6-Ringe hängt von den Abschreckbedingungen ab und kann durch drei Aspekte erklärt werden: Die Verwendung verschiedener Öfen mit unterschiedlichen Austenitisierbedingungen führt zu unterschiedlichen Mengen an gelöstem Kohlenstoff und damit zu unterschiedlichen Mengen an Restaustenit. Die unterschiedliche Abkühlintensität führt durch unterschiedliche Spannungsentwicklungen zu einer unterschiedlichen Aufteilung der Volumenänderung auf die Abmessungen. Darüber hinaus können Anteile von unerwünschtem Bainit entstehen (HDGA).

Die Änderung der Rundheitsabweichung wird in erster Linie durch eine Änderung des Koeffizienten 2. Ordnung definiert. Abgesehen von der Ölabschreckung lassen sich keine wesentlichen Unterschiede zwischen den untersuchten Abschrecktechnologien feststellen. Daher erzeugen die Abschreckprozesse durch Salz und Gas unter den gegebenen Bedingungen keine Inhomogenität zweiter Ordnung in den entsprechenden Temperaturverteilungen. Die resultierenden Werte der Ovalitätsänderung resultieren aus anderen Trägern des Verzugspotentials. Der deutlich erhöhte Fourier-Koeffizient 2. Ordnung bei der Ölabschreckung ist durch eine inhomogenere Temperaturverteilung mit Beträgen 2. Ordnung und/oder erhöhte Gradienten in radialer Richtung zu erklären (Bild 14, links).

Um ein verzogenes Bauteil zu erhalten, muss die Plastifizierung berücksichtigt werden (Bild 1). Während eines Abschreckvorgangs tritt Kriechen aufgrund seiner geringen Dauer nicht auf. Daher sind nur zwei Mechanismen möglich: Fließen und Umwandlungsplastizität (siehe Abschnitt 1.1.2). Um zu verstehen, welcher davon bei den verschiedenen Abschreckprozessen wirkt, wurden die Versuche mit austenitischen Ringen (X5CrNi18-10) als Vergleich durchgeführt. Dieser Stahl zeigt keine Phasenumwandlung. Folglich muss die Umwandlungsplastizität nicht berücksichtigt werden. Die resultierende Radiusänderung (0. Fourierordnung) ist deutlich geringer, da keine Volumenänderung nach dem Abschrecken auftreten kann (Bild 14, rechts). Diese Radiusänderung nimmt von der Gas- zur Salz- bzw. Ölabschreckung zu und korreliert mit zunehmenden Spannungen und steigenden radialen Temperaturgradienten. Die Folge ist eine zunehmende Anisotropie der Dimensionsänderung des mittleren Radius, der Wanddicke und der Breite. Die Summe dieser Änderungen bleibt jedoch konstant bei Null.

Die Fourier-Koeffizienten höherer Ordnung folgen demselben Prinzip. Beim Übergang von der Gas- zur Salz- und Ölabschreckung nimmt der WÜK zu, was zu wachsenden radialen Temperaturgradienten führt. Folglich nehmen auch die Verformungen in den Ringen zu, wenn eine Temperaturinhomogenität in Umfangsrichtung vorhanden ist. Dies muss bei der Ölabschreckung für die 2. und 3. Ordnung der Fall gewesen sein und lässt sich im Wesentlichen durch Variationen im Strömungsfeld während der Abschreckung erklären. Der letzte Schritt ist dann die Überschreitung der Fließgrenze. Der Vergleich dieser Ergebnisse mit den Daten von Lagerringen (100Cr6, Bild 14, links) zeigt den zusätzlichen Effekt der Umwandlungsplastizität. Die meisten Formänderungen der dünnwandigen Ringe sind auf diesen Plastifizierungsmechanismus zurückzuführen.

3.2.3 Ring – Dämpfungsfaktor dünnwandiger Ringe für inhomogene Träger des Verzugspotentials

In diesem Beispiel nutzten Surm et al. ein Gasdüsenfeld (Bild 11) zur Erzeugung von kontrollierten inhomogenen Temperaturfeldern beim Abschreckhärten [25]. Dies geschah durch die Einstellung verschiedener variierender Strömungsfelder mit gleichen Amplituden in den Fourier-Ordnungen zwei, drei und sechs. Dabei wurde nur das Gasströmungsfeld an der äußeren Laufbahn variiert, während die innere Gasverteilung konstant gehalten wurde. Dieses Vorgehen stellt zum einen sicher, dass die Ringe korrekt gehärtet wurden. Andererseits war die Dehnung bzw. die Dehnungsgradientenverteilung in radialer Richtung für alle untersuchten Ordnungen konstant.

Die Ergebnisse dieser Versuche sind in Bild 15 zusammengefasst. Die mittlere Radiusänderung der Ringe (Fourierordnung 0) wird durch die Variation der Abschreckbedingungen praktisch nicht beeinflusst. Trotz einer homogenen Abkühlung wird eine Änderung von etwa 35 μm in der zweiten Ordnung der äußeren Laufbahn durch die Wärmebehandlung festgestellt. Nahezu das gleiche Verhalten dieser Ordnung lässt sich feststellen, wenn die Ringe in ungleichmäßiger Weise mit einer Variation des Gasströmungsfeldes in der dritten und sechsten Ordnung abgeschreckt wurden. Dieses konstante Verzugsverhalten kann durch die Freisetzung von Verzugspotential während der Wärmebehandlung verursacht werden, das bei der Herstellung der Ringe eingebracht wurde.

Ungleichmäßiges Abschrecken mit hoher Amplitude in der zweiten Fourier-Ordnung führt zu einer deutlich erhöhten Ovalität der äußeren Laufbahn im abgeschreckten Zustand. Ähnliche Ergebnisse werden festgestellt, wenn eine ungleichmäßige Abschreckung mit der gleichen hohen Amplitude in der dritten bzw. sechsten Fourier-Ordnung durchgeführt wird. Im Vergleich zu den anderen Fällen kommt es zu einer größeren Veränderung der entsprechenden Formänderungen der äußeren Laufbahn. Die Amplitude der entsprechenden Fourier-Ordnung nimmt jedoch mit zunehmender Ordnung ab, obwohl das ungleichmäßige Abschrecken immer mit der gleichen Amplitude im Gasströmungsfeld durchgeführt wurde.

Theoretische Untersuchungen von Frerichs [26] haben gezeigt, dass für

  • dünnwandige Ringe (Durchmesser viel größer als Wanddicke),

  • mit konstanter Wanddicke über die Breite (Ring mit rechteckigem Querschnitt),

  • einem ebenen Dehnungszustand, und

  • nur Verformungen in radialer Richtung

die Fourier-Amplituden in Gleichung 1 proportional zu einem Dämpfungsfaktor sind:

(2) a k 1 k 2 1 k = 2 , 3 ,

Bei diesen Untersuchungen wurden keine Annahmen über die Quellen der Verformungen im Ring verwendet. Daher ist dieser Dämpfungsfaktor eine Eigenschaft der Geometrie „Ring“ selbst. Ein Vergleich der theoretischen (Gleichung 2) und experimentellen (Bild 15) Amplitudenänderung infolge ungleichmäßiger Abschreckung ist in Tabelle 2 dargestellt. Die experimentellen Verhältnisse ak/a2 für die verschiedenen Fourier-Ordnungen zeigen im Vergleich zu den Vorhersagen praktisch den gleichen Wert und bestätigen die theoretischen Überlegungen in hervorragender Weise.

Doch was ist die Folge dieser Eigenschaft? Die Antwort ist recht einfach. Wirkt eine gegebene Verformungsverteilung im Ring, so reagiert der Ring insofern, dass die Fourierordnung k dieser Verteilung um den Faktor nach Gleichung 2 gedämpft wird. Eine Ordnung 2 wird um den Faktor 1/3 gedämpft, die Ordnung 3 um 1/8, usw. Die Geometrie selbst wirkt wie ein Tiefpassfilter. Aus praktischen Gründen muss geschlussfolgert werden, dass inhomogene Träger des Verzugspotenzials keine niedrigen Ordnungen in ihrem Fourier-Spektrum haben sollten! Folglich sollte sich das Distortion Engineering von Ringen auf die Vermeidung oder Minimierung von Periodizitäten zweiter und dritter Ordnung in den Trägern des Verzugspotenzials konzentrieren. Dies wird mit zunehmenden radialen Gradienten in den betreffenden Trägern immer wichtiger.

3.3 Beispiele für Level 3: Maßnahmen zur Kompensation von Verzügen

3.3.1 Zylinder mit Nut: Kompensation der asymmetrischen Massenverteilung durch High-Speed Quenching

Kobasko und Frerichs untersuchten das Verzugsverhalten von genuteten zylindrischen Bauteilen mit Intensiv-Quenching bzw. High-Speed Quenching (IQ/HSQ). Kobasko et al. haben dies zuerst untersucht [27, 28]. Frerichs verifizierte diese Experimente durch eigene Versuche [29] und wertete sie durch Simulationen detailliert aus [30].

Die Massenverteilung eines genuteten Zylinders ist aufgrund der Nut nicht axialsymmetrisch und daher empfindlich gegenüber Biegung („Bananenform“). Der Grundgedanke von Kobasko war, dass die Biegung durch eine sehr intensive Abkühlung und die mehr oder weniger sofortige Bildung einer Martensitschale auf der gesamten Oberfläche reduziert werden kann.

Frerichs führte seine Versuche mit genuteten Zylindern aus C35 mit Durchmessern von 20 mm und 30 mm und einer Länge von 150 mm durch. Tiefe und Breite der Nut betrugen 20 % des Durchmessers (Bild 16, links). Er verwendete eine Tauchkühlung in nicht umgewälzten Wasser und HSQ mit unterschiedlichen Durchflussmengen, WÜK und durchschnittlichen Wassergeschwindigkeiten gemäß Tabelle 3. Die HSQ-Anlage ist in Bild 16, rechts, schematisch dargestellt.

Die resultierenden Biegeamplituden und Biegerichtungen sind in Bild 17 dargestellt. Messungen und Simulationen zeigen deutlich, dass die Biegeamplitude mit zunehmendem HTC unabhängig vom Wellendurchmesser kontinuierlich abnimmt und gegen Null geht. Verständlicherweise sind die Biegeamplituden bei größeren Wellendurchmessern aufgrund der höheren Steifigkeit kleiner.

Außerdem sind die Richtungen der Wellenbiegung angegeben. Die experimentellen Werte zeigen mit einer Ausnahme immer von der Nut weg. Die Simulationen zeigen, dass dieser Sonderfall auftritt, wenn die Nut nicht ausreichend gekühlt wird.

Diese Ergebnisse haben gezeigt, dass ein Träger des Verzugspotentials mit ausgeprägter Asymmetrie (hier: Geometrie) durch die geschickt gewählte Überlagerung eines zweiten Trägers (hier: Temperatur) in seiner Wirkung nahezu kompensiert werden kann.

3.3.2 Ring – Kompensation von Rundheitsabweichungen aus der spanenden Bearbeitung durch inhomogene Düsenfeldabschreckung

Im Rahmen der Arbeiten des Sonderforschungsbereichs „Distortion Engineering“ wurden verschiedene Ansätze zur Berechnung der Verzugskompensation durch asymmetrische Gasabschreckung getestet. Grundlegende Aufgabe war es, ein Modell zu finden, das den Gasfluss der 12 zur Verfügung stehenden Düsensäulen in Umfangsrichtung (Bild 11, links) beschreibt. Dieses Modell musste in Abhängigkeit der Fourier-Koeffizienten 2 und 3 der Rundheitsschriebe, die nach der Bearbeitung bzw. nach dem Austenitisieren gemessenen wurden, formuliert werden. Lütjens et al. entwickelten schließlich ein Modell, das die notwendige Gasströmungsverteilung m · (φj) für die 12 Düsenreihen j = 1, ... 12 um den Ring berechnet [31]. Die Parameter dieses Modells wurden durch eine Vorserie ermittelt, die aus 11 Versuchen bestand. Auf der Grundlage der Parameterschätzung wurde dann die „Produktion“ gestartet. Anhand dieser zusätzlichen Ergebnisse wurden die Modellparameter iterativ verbessert. Bild 18 zeigt die Formänderungen in der komplexen Ebene. Der Mittelwert der Ovalität wurde von 37 auf 20 μm reduziert und in der 3. Ordnung wurde sogar eine Verbesserung von 36 auf 12 μm erreicht. Bild 19 zeigt die Ergebnisse aus der Sicht der Praxis. Hier hängen die Kosten für Nacharbeit von der Rundheitsabweichung ab. Es ist klar zu erkennen, dass die durchschnittliche Rundheit und deren Streuung deutlich reduziert werden [31].

3.3.3 Ring – Kompensation von Rundheitsabweichungen aus der spanenden Bearbeitung durch Abschrecken in Härtefixturen

Bei dünnwandigen ringförmigen Körpern oder Bauteilen mit extrem asymmetrischer Massenverteilung (z. B. Tellerräder) kann es unumgänglich sein, diese in Härtefixturen abzuschrecken [32]. In solchen Vorrichtungen wirken während des Abschreckens äußere Lasten auf das Bauteil ein. Bei diesem Konzept können Formänderungen wie Unrundheit oder Ebenheit durch die Überlagerung verschiedener Träger des Verzugspotentials kompensiert werden.

Im einfachsten Fall wirken eine konstruktionsbedingte asymmetrische Massenverteilung und die durch die Vorrichtung erzeugte Spannungsverteilung zusammen. In einer komplizierteren Situation werden beim Erwärmen als Folge inhomogener Fertigungseigenspannungen (z. B. Lagerringe) Verzug und damit eine asymmetrische Massenverteilung erzeugt. Beim Abschrecken schrumpft das verzogene Bauteil und der Kontakt zum Dorn beginnt an dem Umfangswinkel mit dem kleinsten Durchmesser. Mit fortschreitender Schrumpfung nehmen die Spannungen in immer mehr Bereichen des Bauteils zu. Die Korrektur der Unrundheit ist zunächst rein elastisch. Abhängig von der Kombination aus Abmessungen, Rundheitsabweichung, Abschreckbedingungen und Umformverhalten kann das Fließen lokal einsetzen und spätestens mit Beginn der Umwandlung ist die Umwandlungsplastizität am Richten beteiligt.

Darüber hinaus ist es prinzipiell möglich, Maßschwankungen zu kompensieren. Dieser Ansatz wurde bisher nur für dünnwandige Lagerringe aus 100Cr6 erprobt [33]. Für ein solches System sind eine prozessbegleitende Messung des Innendurchmessers und ein Spreizdorn erforderlich. Bild 20 zeigt eine Versuchshärtepresse mit einer solchen Einrichtung.

Mit einem solchen System kann der Einfluss von Richthüben, die zu unterschiedlichen Zeiten und mit unterschiedlichen Amplituden wirken, untersucht werden. Bild 21 zeigt solche Messungen für Richtvorgänge, die vor dem Beginn des Abschreckens beginnen und enden. In diesem Fall wirkt nur das Überschreiten der Streckgrenze, und es ist deutlich zu erkennen, dass ein zunehmender Richthub zu zunehmenden Durchmesseränderungen und einer sehr geringen Rundheitsabweichung führt. Das Fourier-Spektrum dieses Diagramms enthält eine kleine Amplitude zweiter Ordnung und eine kleinere Amplitude für die 36. Ordnung. Diese Periodizität ist im Rundheitsdiagramm deutlich zu erkennen und resultiert aus dem Spreizdorn mit 36 Kontaktflächen (Bild 21).

Bild 22 zeigt die Durchmesserentwicklung beim Richten während der Martensitbildung. Hier dürften die plastischen Verformungen hauptsächlich auf die Umwandlungsplastizität zurückzuführen sein, da die Streckgrenze mit abnehmender Temperatur steigt. Allerdings wird die Unrundheit deutlich vergrößert. Zunächst ist eine4. Ordnung im Diagramm deutlich zu erkennen. Zusätzlich ist auch der 36. Fourier-Koeffizient drastisch vergrößert.

Zu Beginn war die 4. Ordnung nicht erklärbar. Es wurde angenommen, dass Seigerungen einen Einfluss haben könnten. Doch dann wurden Temperaturmessungen an verschiedenen Positionen durchgeführt (Bild 23). Das Ergebnis war unerwartet, aber eindeutig: Die mittlere lokale Abkühlungsrate hängt vom Umfangswinkel ab und kann eindeutig mit den vier Winkeln der Ölzufuhr korreliert werden. Bei diesem Ergebnis lag die Erklärung auf der Hand:

An der Position der Zuführungen fließt das Abschrecköl in einen ringförmigen Verteilerkanal (bei den genannten Ringmaßen ist es der Kanal in der Mitte in Bild 23, rechts). Oberhalb dieses Bauteils wird das eigentliche Abschreckwerkzeug (Bild 20) montiert und das Öl gelangt durch kleine Bohrungen an den Ring. Die Höhe des Verteilerkanals war nicht groß genug, um die Ölströmungsgeschwindigkeit in Umfangsrichtung zu homogenisieren. Dies hat zur Folge, dass die Ölgeschwindigkeit direkt am Austritt in den Kanal größer ist als in der Umgebung. Nach dem Durchgang durch die Bohrungen ist diese Geschwindigkeitsverteilung nicht homogenisiert, sodass sich am Ring ein positionsabhängige WÜK und damit eine positionsabhängige mittlere Abkühlgeschwindigkeit ergeben. Wenn das Richten beginnt, hat die Martensitbildung an den Positionen der Einlässe bereits begonnen. Daher tritt an diesen Winkeln Umwandlungsplastizität auf, während am übrigen Ring nur elastische Verformungen auftreten. Das Endergebnis dieser inhomogenen Plastizitätsbildung ist in Bild 23 zu sehen.

3.3.4 Leichtbau-Zahnradgrundkörper – Kompensation asymmetrischer Massenverteilung durch Konstruktionsregeln

Aufgrund ökonomischer und ökologischer Zwänge rückt in den letzten Jahren eine Gewichtsreduzierung bzw. Volumenminimierung von Automobilkomponenten immer mehr in den Fokus industrieller und wissenschaftlicher Aktivitäten. Neben dem Einsatz neuer Werkstoffe mit deutlich geringerer Dichte kann auch eine Veränderung des Bauteildesigns genutzt werden, um die Ziele des Leichtbaus zu erreichen. Allerdings müssen auch Aspekte einer fertigungsgerechten Konstruktion, insbesondere bei wärmebehandelten Antriebsstrangkomponenten, berücksichtigt werden. Diese Thematik gilt insbesondere für die abschließende Wärmebehandlung, da durch die reduzierte Steifigkeit und asymmetrische Massenverteilung eines Bauteils gravierende Verzugsprobleme auftreten können. Um diese Problematik zu analysieren, wurden Zahnradgrundkörper mit reduzierter Steg- und Zahnkranzdicke durch Niederdruckaufkohlung mit anschließender Gasabschreckung oder Gasaufkohlung mit Ölabschreckung einsatzgehärtet. Es wurden verschiedene Kombinationen von Stegdicke, -position und -orientierung untersucht [36]. Bild 24 zeigt einige ausgewählte Ergebnisse. Es ist deutlich zu erkennen, dass bei diesen reduzierten Dimensionen von Stegdicke und Zahnkranzdicke eine sehr hohe Empfindlichkeit des Zahnkranzverzuges für die Orientierung und Position des Steges besteht. Darüber hinaus wird diese Verformung durch die Abschreckintensität deutlich verstärkt: Die Radiusänderungen sind bei Ölabschreckung deutlich höher.

Mit diesen Ergebnissen stellte sich die Frage, ob es geeignete Kombinationen der Abmessungen von Zahnkranzdicke und Stegdicke sowie der Steglage gibt, die zu tolerierbaren Verzügen des Zahnkranzes führen. In einem ersten Schritt wurde der Verzug des Zahnkranzes rechnerisch in eine Kippkomponente und eine Balligkeitskomponente zerlegt. Für die weiteren Betrachtungen wurde nur der Kippwinkel verwendet, der in vielen kritischen Fällen den überwiegenden Verzugsanteil darstellt (siehe Bild 24). Im zweiten Schritt wurden die Wärmeübergangsverteilung und das Umwandlungsverhalten der zugrundeliegenden Stahlschmelze durch aufwendige Messreihen ermittelt und in ein FEM-basiertes Simulationsmodell integriert [37].

Nach Validierung des Modells wurde der Kippwinkel für viele verschiedene Kombinationen der relevanten Dimensionen unter Nutzung des „Design of Experiment“ (DOE) simuliert. Mithilfe eines Regressionsmodells wurden im dritten Schritt Iso-Linien des Kippwinkels bestimmt. Bild 25 zeigt solche Linien als Funktion der Stegdicke und Stegposition für eine Zahnkranzdicke von 5 mm in Kombination mit Ölabschreckung und der Größenklasse PKW. In diesem Diagramm sind z. B. Kombinationen von Stegdicke und Stegposition dargestellt, die zu Kippwinkeln von 0° führen.

Mit diesem Ansatz lassen sich durch geschickte Auslegung des Verzugspotentialträgers „Massenverteilung“ tolerierbare Verzüge für Leichtbaugetriebe mit Volumenreduzierung erzeugen. Bild 25 zeigt aber auch, dass Leichtbau und Bauraumreduzierung nicht unabhängig voneinander erreicht werden können und dass die Berücksichtigung des Verzugspotenzials in beiden Fällen entscheidend für den Konstruktionssprozess ist.

4 Schlussfolgerungen

Nach einer kurzen Darstellung der Grundlagen der Verzugsentstehung und des Distortion Engineering wurden anhand von insgesamt zehn Beispielen die komplexen Zusammenhänge zwischen dem Träger des Verzugspotenzials „Temperaturverteilung“ beim Abschrecken und den Maß- und Formänderungen verschiedener Bauteile aufgezeigt. Daraus lassen sich folgende Punkte ableiten:

  • Der Abschreckprozess birgt generell ein großes Verzugspotenzial.

  • Es gibt Ansätze, um die Maß- und Formänderungen trotz dieses großen Potenzials in Grenzen zu halten.

  • Diese Ansätze betreffen die Wahl eines geeigneten Abschreckmediums und/oder einer geeigneten Chargierung, die von mehrlagig über einlagig bis hin zu einteilig reicht.

  • Beim Härten von dünnwandigen Ringen spielt die Umwandlungsplastizität eine wichtige Rolle.

  • Bei der Herstellung dünnwandiger Wälzlagerringe sind insbesondere niedrige Fourier-Ordnungen der Verzugspotenzialträger zu vermeiden.

  • Abschreckungen mit extrem großem Wärmeübergang können Asymmetrien in anderen Verzugspotenzialträgern zumindest teilweise kompensieren.

  • Auch bei einer Härtefixtur müssen Fourier-Koeffizienten niedriger Ordnung in der resultierenden Bauteiltemperaturverteilung und damit im Abschreckprozess vermieden werden.

  • Bei Leichtbaugetrieben kann eine begrenzte Vergrößerung des Stegmaßes die Auswirkungen einer asymmetrischen Massenverteilung kompensieren. Dies erfordert jedoch noch die Entwicklung entsprechender Auslegungsrichtlinien.

  • Grundsätzlich können gezielt inhomogene Abschreckprozesse eingesetzt werden, um Formabweichungen gegenüber bisherigen Verfahren zu reduzieren.


* Reworked version of a lecture held at ECHT – Quenching and Distortion Engineering QDE 2021, 26.-18. April 2021, online


Acknowledgement

The authors gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the research work by the German Research Foundation (DFG) within the Collaborative Research Center 570 “Distortion Engineering” and all former members of this project. Special thanks to the initiator of this project Prof. Peter Mayr and his successor as speaker Prof. Hans-Werner Zoch.

Furthermore, we would like to thank the members of the AWT technical committee „Dimensional and Shape Changes“ for the numerous discussions on this topic and their support in carrying out the research projects in this area.

Danksagung

Die Autoren bedanken sich für die finanzielle Unterstützung der Forschungsarbeiten durch die Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) im Rahmen des Sonderforschungsbereichs 570 „Distortion Engineering“ sowie bei allen ehemaligen Mitgliedern dieses Projekts. Besonderer Dank gilt dem Initiator dieses Projektes Prof. Peter Mayr und seinem Nachfolger als Sprecher Prof. Hans-Werner Zoch.

Weiterhin danken wir den Mitgliedern des AWT-Fachausschusses „Maß- und Formänderungen“ für die zahlreichen Diskussionen zu diesem Thema und die Unterstützung bei der Durchführung der Forschungsprojekte in diesem Bereich.

References

1 Berns, H.: Verzug von Stählen infolge von Wärmebehandlung. Mater. Sci. Technol. 8 (1977), pp. 149–157, DOI:10.1002/mawe.1977008050410.1002/mawe.19770080504Search in Google Scholar

2 Mayr, P.: Dimensional Alterations of Parts due to Heat Treatment. Residual stresses in science and technology, Vol. 1, E. Macherauch, V. Hauk (eds.), DGM, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, 1987, pp. 57–77Search in Google Scholar

3 Pan, J.: Factors affecting final part shaping. Handbook of residual stress and deformation of steel. G. Totten, M. Howes, T. Inoue (eds.), ASM International, Materials Park, OH, USA, 2002, pp. 159–182, DOI:10.1361/hrsd2002p15910.1361/hrsd2002p159Search in Google Scholar

4 Holm, T.: Distortion, Steel and its heat treatment – a Handbook. T. Holm, P. Olsson, E. Troell (eds.), Sverea IVF AB/RISE, Mölndal, Sweden, 2010, pp. 591–633. – ISBN: 978-91-86401-11-5Search in Google Scholar

5 Troell, E.: Quenching processes in gases. Proc. European Conf. on Heat Treatment ECHT 2021 and 2nd Int. Conf. on Quenching and Distortion Engineering QDE 2021, 27.-28.04.21, online, Th. Lübben, J. Kleff (eds.), AWT e. V., Bremen, 2021, pp. 3–10Search in Google Scholar

6 MacKenzie, S.: Quenching processes in fluids. Proc. European Conf. on Heat Treatment ECHT 2021 and 2nd Int. Conf. on Quenching and Distortion Engineering QDE 2021, 27.-28.04.21, online, Th. Lübben, J. Kleff, AWT e. V.; Bremen, 2021, pp. 74–84Search in Google Scholar

7 Lübben, Th.: Quenching and Distortion. Handbook of Quenchants and Quenching Technology, 2nd ed., G. E. Totten (ed.), ASM Int., Materials Park, OH, USA, to be published in 2022Search in Google Scholar

8 Lübben, Th.; Hoffmann, F., Zoch, H.-W.: Distortion Engineering: Basics and Application to Practical Examples of Bearing Races. Comprehensive Materials Processing, M. S. J. Hashimi (ed.), Vol. 13., Elsevier Ltd., Waltham, MA, USA, 2014, pp. 299–344. – ISBN: 9780080965321Search in Google Scholar

9 Lübben, Th.: Basics of distortion and stress generation during heat treatment. ASM Handbook, Steel Heat Treating Technologies, J. L. Dossett, G. E. Totten (eds.), Vol. 4B, ASM Int., Materials Park, OH, USA, 2014, pp. 339–354. – ISBN: 9781627080255Search in Google Scholar

10 Ahrens, U.; Besserdich, G., Maier, H. J.: Spannungsabhängiges bainitisches und martensitisches Umwandlungsverhalten eines niedrig legierten Stahls. Härterei-Techn. Mitt. 55 (2000) 6, pp. 329–338Search in Google Scholar

11 Heeß, K.: Maß- und Formänderungen infolge Wärmebehandlung von Stählen. Vol. 5., Expert Verlag, Renningen, 2017. – ISBN: 3-8169-2678-9Search in Google Scholar

12 Lement, B. S.: Distortion in tool steels. ASM, Metal Park, Novelty, OH, USA, 1959Search in Google Scholar

13 Streng, T.; Heeß, K.; Lübben, Th.: Dimensionally and geometrically accurate quenching of ring-shaped components in fully-automated hardening presses. Proc. 19th ASM Heat Treating Society Conf., 1.-4.11.99, Cincinnati, OH, USA, S. J. Midea (ed.), ASM Int., Materials Park, OH, USA, 2000, pp. 317‒324Search in Google Scholar

14 Surm, H.: Mechanismen der Verzugsentstehung bei Wälzlagerringen aus 100Cr6. HTM J. Heat Treatm. Mat. 63 (2012) 5, pp. 291–303, DOI:10.3139/105.11016310.3139/105.110163Search in Google Scholar

15 Lübben, Th.; Zoch, H.-W.: Einführung in die Grundlagen des Distortion Engineering. HTM J. Heat Treatm. Mat. 67 (2012) 5, pp. 275–290, DOI:10.3139/105.11016110.3139/105.110161Search in Google Scholar

16 Besserdich, G.; Müller, H.; Macherauch, E.: Experimentelle Erfassung der Umwandlungsplastizität und ihre Auswirkungen auf Eigenspannungen und Verzüge. HTM Härterei-Techn. Mitt. 50 (1995) 6, pp. 389–396Search in Google Scholar

17 Hoffmann, F.; Kessler, O.; Lübben, Th.; Mayr, P.: „Distortion Engineering“ – Distortion Control during the Production Process. Heat Treatment of Metals 31 (2004) 2, pp. 27–30Search in Google Scholar

18 Simsir, C.; Dalgic, M.; Lübben, Th.; Irretier, A.; Wolff, M.; Zoch, H.-W.: The Bauschinger effect in the supercooled austenite of SAE 52100 steel. Acta Mater. 58 (2010) 13, pp. 4478–4491, DOI:10.1016/j.actamat.2010.04.04410.1016/j.actamat.2010.04.044Search in Google Scholar

19 Zoch, H.-W.: Distortion engineering – interim results after one decade research within the Collaborative Research Center Distortion Engineering. Mat.-wiss. u. Werkstofftech. 43 (2012) 1-2, pp. 9–15, DOI:10.1002/mawe.20110088110.1002/mawe.201100881Search in Google Scholar

20 Lübben, Th.; Surm, H.; Hoffmann, F.; Mayr, P.: Maß- und Formänderungen beim Hochdruck-Gasabschrecken. HTM Härterei-Techn. Mitt. 58 (2003) 2, pp. 51–60Search in Google Scholar

21 Lübben, Th.; Kagathara, J.; Fechte-Heinen, R.: Influence of the quenching process on the distortion behavior of a weight-reduced counter gear. Proc. ECHT 2021 and 2nd Int. Conf. on Quenching and Distortion Engineering QDE 2021, 27.28.04.2021, online, Th. Lübben, J. Kleff, (eds.), AWT e. V., Bremen, 2021, pp. 177–187Search in Google Scholar

22 Korecki, M.; Wołowiec-Korecka, E.; Sut, M.; Brewka, A.; Stachurski, W.; Zgórniak, P.: Precision Case Hardening by Low Pressure Carburizing (LPC) for High Volume Production, HTM J. of Heat Treatm. Mat. 72 (2017) 3, pp. 175–183, DOI:10.3139/105.11032510.3139/105.110325Search in Google Scholar

23 Lübben Th.; Frerichs, F.: Influence of Rewetting Behavior on the Distortion of Bearing Races. J. Mater. Eng. Perform. 22 (2013) 8, pp. 2323–2330. DOI: 10.1007/ s11665-013-0501-710.1007/s11665-013-0501-7Search in Google Scholar

24 Frerichs, F.; Lübben, Th.; Hoffmann, F.; Zoch, H.-W.: Distortion of conical formed bearing rings made of SAE 52100. Materwiss. Werksttech. 40 (2009) 5-6, pp. 402– 407, DOI:10.1002/mawe.20090046710.1002/mawe.200900467Search in Google Scholar

25 Surm, H.; Frerichs, F.; Lübben, Th.; Hoffmann, F.; Zoch, H.-W.: Distortion of rings due to inhomogeneous temperature distributions. Materwiss. Werksttech. 43 (2012) 1-2, pp. 29–36, DOI:10.1002/mawe.20110088410.1002/mawe.201100884Search in Google Scholar

26 Frerichs, F.; Lübben, Th.; Hoffmann, F.; Zoch, H.-W.: Ring geometry as an important part of Distortion Potential. Materwiss. Werksttech. 43 (2012) 1-2, pp. 16–22, DOI 10.1002/mawe.20110088210.1002/mawe.201100882Search in Google Scholar

27 Aronov, M. A.; Kobasko, N. I.; Powell, J. A.: Application of Intensive Quenching methods for steel parts. Proc. 21st Heat Treating Conf., 5.-8.11.2001, Indianapolis, IN, USA, B. Liscic, H. M. Tensi, S. Shrivastava, F. Specht (eds.), ASM Int., 2002, on CDSearch in Google Scholar

28 Kobasko, N. I.; Aronov, M. A.; Powell, J. A; Totten, G. E.: Intensive Quenching Systems, Engineering and Design. ASTM Int., West Conshohocken PA, USA, 2010Search in Google Scholar

29 Frerichs, F.; Lübben, Th.: Distortion of grooved steel cylinders due to high speed quenching. Proc. 3rd Int. Conf. Heat Treatment and Surface Engineering in Automotive Applications, 11.-13.05.16, Prague, Czech Republic, ATZK, Čerčany, 2016, on CDSearch in Google Scholar

30 Frerichs, F.; Lübben, Th.: Simulation of High Speed Quenching of Grooved steel cylinders, Extended Abstract. Proc. 1st Int. Conf. Quenching and Distortion Engineering. 27.-29.11.18, Nagoya, Japan, IFHTSE, 2018, on CDSearch in Google Scholar

31 Lütjens, J.; Surm, H.; Hunkel. H.: Verzugskompensation an Wälzlagerringen aus 100Cr6. HTM J. Heat Treatm. Mat. 67 (2012) 5, pp. 304–310, DOI:10.3139/ 105.11016410.3139/105.110164Search in Google Scholar

32 Zoch, H.-W.; Lübben, Th.: Verzugsarme Wärmebehandlung niedrig legierter Werkzeugstähle. HTM J. Heat Treatm. Mat. 65 (2010) 4, pp. 209–218, DOI:10.3139/105.11006510.3139/105.110065Search in Google Scholar

33 Lübben, Th.; Mayr, P.; Hoffmann, F.: Radius-controlled hardening of bearing rings in a quenching press. Proc. 2nd Int. Conf. on Quenching and the Control of Distortion, 4.-7.11.96, Cleveland, OH, USA, ASM Int., Materials Park, OH, USA, 1996, pp. 387–393. – ISBN: 0871705842Search in Google Scholar

34 Zoch, H.-W.; Lübben, T., Hoffmann, F.; Mayr, P: Verzug und Strangguß – Einfluß des Gießformats beim Fixturhärten von Wälzlagerstahlringen. HTM Härterei-Techn. Mitt. 49 (1994) 4, pp. 245–253, DOI:10.1515/htm-1994-49040810.1515/htm-1994-490408Search in Google Scholar

35 Lübben, T., Hoffmann, F.; Mayr, P.; Zoch, H.-W.: Einfluß von Abkühlbedingungen und Richtoperationen auf das Verzugsverhalten von Ringen. HTM Härterei-Techn. Mitt. 50 (1995) 1, pp. 42–45Search in Google Scholar

36 Lübben, T., Surm, H.: Influence of Design on Distortion of Gas and Oil Quenched Gear Base Bodies. Proc. 23rd IFHTSE Congress. 18.-21.04.16, Savannah, Georgia, USA, Curran Associates Inc., Red Hook, NY, USA, 2016, pp. 411–420. – ISBN: 9781510823709Search in Google Scholar

37 Surm, H.; Lübben, T.; Hunkel, M.: Konstruktions- und größenbedingte Einflüsse auf den Verzug von ölabgeschreckten Zahnradgrundkörpern – Teil 2: Ermittlung des Verzugsverhaltens mittels der Finite-Elemente-Methode. HTM J. Heat Treatm. Mat. 72 (2017) 4, pp. 215–231, DOI:10.3139/105.11032910.3139/105.110329Search in Google Scholar

Published Online: 2021-12-31

© 2021 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston, Germany