Skip to content
BY 4.0 license Open Access Published by De Gruyter June 21, 2022

Variation of the Compound Layer Structure by Controlled Gas Nitriding and Nitrocarburizing

Variation der Verbindungsschichtstruktur durch kontrolliertes Gasnitrieren und Nitrocarburieren
M. Sommer, J. Epp, M. Steinbacher, R. Fechte-Heinen and S. Hoja

Abstract

In order to enhance the load capacity, gears can be nitrided. The diffusion zone, measurable by the nitriding hardness depth, is considered to be the parameter governing for the high load-bearing capacity of nitrided gears. The wear behavior of gears is mainly determined by the characteristics (phase, porosity and chemical composition) of the compound layer but the influence of the compound layer on the load carrying capacity is not known yet. In this work, nitriding treatments for gears were developed with the aim to create compound layers with varying thickness, composition and properties in order to ensure a maximum load carrying capacity for nitrided gears.

Kurzfassung

Um die Tragfähigkeit von Zahnrädern zu erhöhen, können diese nitriert werden. Die Diffusionszone, messbar durch die Nitrierhärtetiefe, gilt als der für die hohe Belastbarkeit von nitrierten Zahnrädern maßgebliche Parameter. Das Verschleißverhalten von Zahnrädern wird hauptsächlich durch die Eigenschaften (Phase, Porosität und chemische Zusammensetzung) der Verbindungsschicht bestimmt, aber der Einfluss der Verbindungsschicht auf die Tragfähigkeit ist noch nicht bekannt. In dieser Arbeit wurden Nitrierverfahren für Zahnräder mit dem Ziel entwickelt, Verbindungsschichten mit unterschiedlicher Dicke, Zusammensetzung und Eigenschaften zu erzeugen, um eine maximale Tragfähigkeit für nitrierte Zahnräder zu gewährleisten.

1 Introduction

Gears are important components in machine, plant and vehicle construction. In order to enhance their load capacity, gears can be submitted to thermo-chemical treatments and often case hardening using carburizing is applied. When increased corrosion resistance and higher temperature resistance is required nitriding can be applied. This thermos-chemical treatment consists of enriching the surface layer of ferrous material workpieces with nitrogen at temperatures below the point where austenite forms. If the surface layer is enriched with both nitrogen and carbon, it is termed nitrocarburizing [1].

The nitride layer on unalloyed steel consists of a hard, surface near compound layer and a diffusion zone underneath [2]. The compound layer consists of iron nitrides, while the diffusion zone consists of nitride precipitates at the grain boundaries of the base material, their number decreases with increasing edge distance. The compound layer consists of iron nitrides, while the diffusion zone consists of nitride precipitates at the grain boundaries of the base material, the number of which decreases with increasing edge distance. If the base material is an alloyed Q&T (quenched and tempered) steels originally consisting of a ferritic, fine-grained matrix with finely dispersed alloy carbides (MxC), the alloy carbides are converted into various alloy nitrides (MyN) when enriched with nitrogen, since nitrogen has a higher affinity for these alloying elements than carbon. The excess carbon within the diffusion zone escapes to the grain boundaries where it first forms cementite (Fe3C), and then is converted into epsilon phase (ε-Fe2-3(C,N)) upon further nitrogen addition. The competing surface reactions during gas nitriding, such as nitrogen diffusion into the substrate and desorption of nitrogen molecules from the surface, cause the nitrogen concentration at the surface to increase. Once the solubility limit for the nitrogen in the ferrite matrix has been exceeded, γ’-iron nitrides (γ’-Fe4N) form at the surface [3], marking the start of the compound layer growth. It then depends on the nitriding parameters, in particular the nitriding potential, whether a mono-phase layer consisting of only γ’-nitride is formed. If the nitriding potential in the gas atmosphere is high enough before a closed γ’-nitride layer develops, further ε-iron nitride nuclei (ε-Fe2-3N) form on the γ’-nuclei. The lateral growth of such twin nuclei eventually leads to the development of a closed two-phase layer consisting of γ’- and ε-iron nitrides in a binary iron-nitrogen system [4]. If the basic material is an alloyed steel, the γ’- and ε-nitrides typically appear mixed, often with γ’-grains embedded in a continuous ε-phase. Additional alloying elements might lead to the formation of further nitrides, depending on their Gibbs-Energy, which is particularly the case for Chromium and Silicon [6]. The further growth of the compound and diffusion layers is realized by nitrogen transport through the compound layer.

In the surface near part of the compound layer usually porosity can be observed. Pore formation is the consequence of that nitriding and nitrocarburizing are nonequilibrium processes, where nitrogen is forced into solid solution in the steel surface via reaction with instable ammonia. In the resulting solid solution, there is a strong supersaturation of the nitrogen relative to the molecular nitrogen at atmospheric pressure, corresponding to a high equilibrium nitrogen pressure. This high pressure provides a strong “driving force” for pore formation. Once this pressure is high enough, the metastable iron-nitride-phases in the compound layer tend to dissociate to iron and molecular nitrogen gas, which is considered the most common cause of pore formation [7]. In most cases, this decomposition of the nitrides takes place at grain boundaries within the compound layer, which can lead to the formation of longer pore chains [7] and the denitration of the uppermost surface layer of the material. The formation of a porous part in the compound layer is difficult to avoid [1]. As the nitrogen concentration is highest near the surface, the pore formation is most likely in the iron nitride phases there (mostly ε-nitrides). Furthermore, an increasing nitriding duration correlates with the increase of pores in the compound layer, in addition to the increase of the compound layer thickness (CLT). In the initial stages of a nitriding process, the diffusion of nitrogen atoms into the deeper zones of the material dominates over the association of nitrogen atoms to nitrogen gas molecules. Therefore, it is possible to produce porefree thin compound layers by short process durations. For energy reasons, pores usually form at the grain boundaries, can grow together and thus form channels. During gas nitriding, nitrogen gas can effuse out of the nitrided material via the channels.

Former investigations showed, that the wear behavior of gears is mainly influenced by the composition and the structure of the compound layer [9]. The influence of the compound layer on the load carrying capacity is not known yet. Thus, the aim of the current investigations is to find the relation between the compound layer characteristics (thickness, phase composition and porosity) and the load capacity. By means of different nitriding heat treatments as gas nitriding and gas nitrocarburizing it is possible to create various reproducible compound layer characteristics. The future goal is to establish a parameter matrix for the compound layer design that meets the requirements, so nitrided gears with increased load capacity can be produced.

2 Materials and Methods

2.1 Specimen Preparation

The common nitriding steel EN31CrMoV9 (1.8519) with 0.31 ma.% C, 2.50 ma.% Cr, 0.20 ma.% Mo, and 0.15 ma.% V and the tempering steel EN42CrMo4 (1.7225; AISI 4140) with 0.42 ma.% C, 1.10 ma.% Cr, and 0.25 ma.% Mo were chosen.

The materials were quenched and tempered before nitriding. The EN31CrMoV9 material was austenitized at 870 °C, quenched in oil and tempered at 620 °C in vacuum. Prior heat treatment for the EN42CrMo4 was performed with 860 °C austenitizing temperature, oil quenching and a tempering at 620 °C to produce a similar microstructure condition.

The samples were slide ground prior to the nitriding treatments to remove impurities and oxide layers from the surfaces and to activate them for nitriding. For this purpose, the samples were placed in a rotating drum together with an abrasive for several hours.

Table 1

Nitriding and nitrocarburizing conditions

Tabelle 1. Nitrier- und Nitrocarburierbedingungen

T [°C] t [h] rN [bar-1/2] rCB [bar]
520 42 1.8
3.0
5.0
550 21 1.4
2.5
4.5
570 14 1.0
2.0
3.5
3.5 0.1
3.5 0.2
3.5 0.3

2.2 Nitriding and nitrocarburizing treatment for different compound layers

The nitriding and nitrocarburizing treatments (Table 1) were carried out in a gas nitriding system with nitriding and carburizing potential control. The heating was carried out under an ammonia atmosphere and with the addition of dissociated ammonia that had previously been completely decomposed in a cracker (cracked gas) for the purpose of nitriding potential control. The sample surface is activated by the ammonia during heating. Cooling after nitriding was also phase-controlled with the addition of cracked ammonia gas, taking into account the Lehrer diagram [1], in order to avoid nitrogen effusion and the associated denitration at the end of the process.

The phase composition of the compound layer was varied in systematic experiments. In addition to pure γ’-nitride compound layers, the aim was to create pure ε-nitride compound layers as well as mixed layers of γ’- and ε-nitride. In the compound layer, a porous zone almost always occurs. In order to investigate the influence of the porosity on the load carrying capacity of the gears, the investigations on the nitriding treatment focused also on the variation of the porosity of the compound layer by different nitriding conditions.

The choice of the nitriding potential for the nitriding processes is based on the phase boundary between the γ’- and the ε-nitride phases in the Lehrer diagram, which is valid for binary Fe-N systems. Since the Lehrer diagram represents the existence ranges of the nitride phases in pure iron during gas nitriding, it can be assumed that the phase boundaries shift to higher nitriding potentials in the presence of carbon and nitride-forming alloying elements. In the first series of experiments on compound layer design, the focus was initially on the creation of compound layers of almost pure γ’-nitrides. For this purpose, the nitriding potential for the nitriding temperatures 520 °C, 550 °C and 570 °C was chosen so that it lies on the boundary between the nitride phases in the binary system iron-nitrogen (rN = 1.8 bar-1/2 at 520 °C, rN = 1.4 bar-1/2 at 550 °C and rN = 1.0 bar-1/2 at 570 °C). In a further series of experiments on the phase composition, the nitriding potentials were increased with the aim of bringing the γ’-nitride and ε-nitride phase fractions to similar values in order to produce mixed layers and achieve greater compound layer thicknesses. A third series of experiments with an even higher nitriding potential was conducted to result in compound layers consisting of predominantly ε-nitrides.

The nitriding duration correlated to the nitriding temperature was estimated on the basis of previous investigations on the material EN31CrMoV9 [10]. The aim was to achieve a uniform nitriding hardness depth (NHD) of 0.3‒0.4 mm for all samples, because a minimum nitriding hardness depth of around 0.4 mm is necessary in order to rule out any influence of the nitriding hardness depth during gear tests. The effective requirement with regard to the nitriding hardness depth results from the stress curve of the Hertzian pressure over the component edge layer, whose maximum equivalent stress lies at a depth depending on the load and contact geometry of 0.1 to 0.4 mm. Due to the lower content of alloying elements of the material EN42CrMo4 a higher nitriding hardness depth is expected for this material.

2.3 Investigation methods

The compound layer characteristics such as phase structure, porous layer and concentration distribution of the elements have substantial effects on the mechanical properties of the compound layers. In order to identify all correlations between compound layer and load-carrying capacity, the compound layers were characterized extensively. In addition to the standard analysis (cross section with nital etching and hardness curve), the phase composition of the compound layer was determined by special etching, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (GD-OES).

2.3.1 Special etching methods

Nital etching is used as standard for the optical separation of the compound layer and the diffusion layer. This etchant attacks the compound layer less, so that it appears white under the light microscope. For the investigations in the present work, a 3 % alcoholic HNO3 solution was used as standard. In order to obtain information not only about the thickness of the compound layer and the porous zone but also about the phase composition and distribution, additional etching methods were used. To visualize nitride and carbon concentrations in the compound layer Murakami etchant was applied to the samples. Detailed information on the etchants used and etching methods conducted in this work can be found in Table 2.

Table 2

Etchants used for contrasting the nitrided samples

Tabelle 2. Für die Kontrastierung der nitrierten Proben verwendete Ätzmittel

Name Composition Etching time Source
Nital 3 % alcoholic HNO3 20 sec [11, 12]
Murakami 10 g Kalium-hexacyanoferrate (III)/10 g NaOH/ 100 ml H2O/60 °C 5 min [11, 13]

2.3.2 X-ray diffraction (XRD)

X-ray diffraction was used to determine the phase components of the compound layer. Diffraction patterns were measured using a θ/2θ Diffractometer of Type MZ VI E from GE Inspection Technologies with Cr-Kα radiation and a primary beam of about 2 mm in diameter. An angular 2θ range from 50° to 164° was measured with a position sensitive detector equipped with a Vanadium kβ-filter using a step-size of 0.05° with a total time of 2 h for each measurement. The quantitative analysis of the diffraction patterns was performed according to the Rietveld method by using the software TOPAS 4.2 from Bruker-AXS. In this method, the entire diffraction pattern of polycrystalline materials is fitted by considering the instrumental contribution and physically-based data about the crystal structure of the present phases as well as microstructural parameters as crystallite size and microstrains [14]. Texture and residual stress effects on the diffraction patterns can also be taken into account by this method. In the present analyses, following phases were considered: ε-Fe2-3N and γ’-Fe4N, CrN, Fe3C and the α-Fe substrate.

The penetration depth of the X-ray beam depends on the Wavelength of the radiation used, on the investigated material and it varies according to the geometrical configuration for the measurements. With chromium Kα radiation in Fe-based materials, the standardized penetration depth, defined as the region from which 63 % of the recorded signal is generated, is 3 to 6 μm thick [15]. However, signals from deeper regions up to about 15‒20 μm are also diffracted to the detector. Since the presently investigated compound layers have high chemical and microstructural gradients along the depth, the integration over the depth has to be carefully considered for data interpretation.

2.3.3 Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectrometry (GD-OES)

GD-OES analysis was performed with a device of type LECO GD-S750A for determining element concentrations over the nitriding layer with high depth resolution. Through continuous Argon sputtering, it is possible to investigate time- and therefore depth-dependent chemical composition. This makes it possible to estimate certain parameters of the compound layer, such as the compound layer thickness, and also to make limited statements about the phase composition based on the nitrogen concentration of the different nitrides. The circular analysis area corresponds to the diameter of the focal spot (4 mm in the test results shown in this work) during the measurement. This allows the element concentration profiles of individual elements to be recorded with high statistical accuracy, but no direct information on the phases contained can be obtained with this technique.

3 Results and discussion

3.1 Nitriding treatments

The nitriding hardness depths determined after the nitriding experiments are shown in Table 3. As expected, the nitriding processes at 520 °C, 550 °C and 570 °C led to similar nitriding hardness depths of 0.3–0.4 mm for the material EN31CrMoV9. Similar nitriding hardness depths were also obtained for the EN42CrMo4 grade (0.4–0.5 mm) which, as expected, are higher than the values of the nitriding hardness depths of the EN31CrMoV9, since there are less nitride forming alloying elements in the EN42CrMo4 and the growth rate of the diffusion zone is faster in comparison to EN31CrMoV9. The thickness of the compound layer and the porous part of the compound layer after nitriding at different temperatures with different nitriding potential is shown in Figure 1. As expected, the compound layer thickness increases with increasing nitriding potential and temperature, for both materials. Due to the lower content of nitride forming elements, the compound layer thickness of material EN42CrMo4 is higher than for the material EN31CrMoV9 after the same nitriding treatment. As EN42CrMo4 has a higher base carbon content and less nitride-forming alloying elements, higher ε-nitride contents could be obtained, which can be seen in Figure 2(b). In the first series of tests at the phase boundary of the binary system, it was already possible to produce a mixed compound layer with almost equal γ’- and ε-nitride contents at 550 °C nitriding temperature. The ε-nitride content could be further increased to over 60 % by raising the nitriding potential, before a further increase in the nitriding potential no longer had any influence on the ε-nitride formation, but resulted in an increase in the γ’-nitrides. At the other nitriding temperatures 520 °C and 570 °C, a predominant proportion of ε-nitrides could only be obtained in the second series of tests at a medium nitriding potential. Here too, the further increase in the nitriding potential showed a decrease in the ε-nitrides and an increase in the γ’-nitrides in the compound layer. Possible causes for the apparently decreasing ε-nitride content at a higher nitriding temperature of 570 °C have already been discussed for the material EN31CrMoV9, where reference was made to increasing decarburization with increasing temperature and the possible influence of pore formation. In addition, in the case of EN42CrMo4, the test series in the phase region of the ε-nitride of the binary system showed much thicker compound layers of up to 30 μm compared to less than 15 μm for EN31CrMoV9. Therefore, the XRD analysis method which integrates mainly over few micrometers is not catching the same portion of the compound layer thickness in both materials, resulting in differences in the respective phase contents.

Fig. 1 Increase in compound layer thickness (CLT) and porous layer thickness (CLTP) with increasing nitriding potential for materials (a) EN31CrMoV9; (b) EN42CrMo4; the values for CLT and CLTP were determined on cross sections, using optical microscopyBild 1. Zunahme der Verbindungsschichtdicke (CLT) und der Porensaumdicke (CLTP) mit zunehmender Nitrierkennzahl für die Werkstoffe (a) EN31CrMoV9; (b) EN42CrMo4; die Werte für CLT und CLTP wurden an Querschliffen mithilfe der Lichtmikroskopie ermittelt

Fig. 1

Increase in compound layer thickness (CLT) and porous layer thickness (CLTP) with increasing nitriding potential for materials (a) EN31CrMoV9; (b) EN42CrMo4; the values for CLT and CLTP were determined on cross sections, using optical microscopy

Bild 1. Zunahme der Verbindungsschichtdicke (CLT) und der Porensaumdicke (CLTP) mit zunehmender Nitrierkennzahl für die Werkstoffe (a) EN31CrMoV9; (b) EN42CrMo4; die Werte für CLT und CLTP wurden an Querschliffen mithilfe der Lichtmikroskopie ermittelt

Table 3

Nitriding hardness depths (NHD) of the gas nitriding processes carried out without carbon donors for the materials EN31CrMoV9 and EN42CrMo4

Tabelle 3. Nitrierhärtetiefen (NHD) der ohne Kohlenstoffspender durchgeführten Gasnitrierverfahren für die Werkstoffe EN31CrMoV9 und EN42CrMo4

T t rN NHD [mm]
[°C] [h] [bar-1/2] EN31CrMoV9 EN42CrMo4
520 42 1.8 0.45 0.52
3.0 0.44 0.40
5.0 0.46 0.52
550 21 1.4 0.40 0.43
2.5 0.40 0.45
4.5 0.46 0.44
570 14 1.0 0.33 0.41
2.0 0.45 0.44
3.5 0.36 0.40
Fig. 2 ε-Nitride phase fractions of the compound layers produced from the gas nitriding processes of Table 1 for materials (a) EN31CrMoV9; (b) EN42CrMo4Bild 2. ε-Nitrid-Phasenanteile der Verbindungsschichten aus den Gasnitrierverfahren der Tabelle 1 für die Werkstoffe (a) EN31CrMoV9; (b) EN42CrMo4

Fig. 2

ε-Nitride phase fractions of the compound layers produced from the gas nitriding processes of Table 1 for materials (a) EN31CrMoV9; (b) EN42CrMo4

Bild 2. ε-Nitrid-Phasenanteile der Verbindungsschichten aus den Gasnitrierverfahren der Tabelle 1 für die Werkstoffe (a) EN31CrMoV9; (b) EN42CrMo4

3.2 Nitrocarburizing treatments

In order to increase the ε-nitride content nevertheless, nitrocarburizing was carried out in selected processes by adding a carbon donator to the nitriding atmosphere (regulated carburizing potential via Boudouard equilibrium rCB and use of CO and CO2) [6].

A series of experiments was performed at 570 °C by varying the carburizing potential. The duration of the treatments was 14 h and the nitriding potential was set to rN = 3.5 bar-1/2. Since the diffusion of carbon does not only promote the growth of the compound layer but can also lead to the formation of cementite, the cementite content was determined by XRD. First, measurements were performed directly from the surface of the samples, but the detected cementite content was rather low in all cases (2 to maximum 6 ma.-% for the highest carburizing potential). After considering the determined element depth profiles by GDOES, showing maximum carbon concentration at rather 10 to 25 μm below the surface, additional XRD measurements were performed after electrochemical etching down to about 10 μm depth for all samples. The diffraction patterns for the material EN31CrMoV9 are exemplarily presented in Figure 3, which clearly demonstrate the growth of cementite peaks with increasing carburizing potential, while the nitride peaks decrease progressively. The strong increase of the cementite content of the gas nitrocarburized samples with increase in the carburizing potential is summarized for both materials in Figure 4. Extremely high cementite contents tending to about 90 ma.-% are resulting for the highest carburizing potential. In Table 4 it can be seen that the compound layer thickness decreases with increasing carburizing potential. The formation of cementite has a retarding effect on the nitrogen diffusion, in that the near stoichiometric cementite layer hampers nitrogen diffusion [16], reducing the resulting compound layer thickness. Especially if a phase with low diffusivity and/or low solubility range forms a continuous layer within the compound layer, this will (“mechanically”) retard the diffusion flux from the surface and inwards. Furthermore, cementite formation can also influence the nitriding hardness depth. In the current investigations a decrease of nitriding hardness depth occurred only at a carburizing potential of rCB = 0.3 bar. The resulting nitriding hardness depths of the processes with lower carburizing potentials (0.1 bar and 0.2 bar) are slightly higher than the resulting nitriding hardness depths from the gas nitriding process. Figure 5 and Figure 6 show the compound layers of the materials EN31CrMoV9 and EN42CrMo4 etched with Nital. According to Table 4 the thickness of the porous zone is about the same during nitrocarburizing with different carburizing potentials, but from the cross sections it can be seen that the porosity extends over a greater portion of the compound layer thickness.

Fig. 3 Diffraction patterns of the compound layers produced by nitrocarburizing with different carburizing potentials for the material EN31CrMoV9 after electrochemical etching; ■ γ’-Fe4N, ● Fe-alpha, ▲ Fe3C, ♦ CrN, ♥ ε-Fe2-3(N,C)Bild 3. Beugungsmuster der durch Nitrocarburieren mit unterschiedlichen Kohlungskennzahlen erzeugten Verbindungsschichten für den Werkstoff EN31CrMoV9 nach elektrochemischem Abtrag; ■ γ‘-Fe4N, ● Fe-alpha, ▲ Fe3C, ♦ CrN, ♥ ε-Fe2-3(N,C)

Fig. 3

Diffraction patterns of the compound layers produced by nitrocarburizing with different carburizing potentials for the material EN31CrMoV9 after electrochemical etching; ■ γ’-Fe4N, ● Fe-alpha, ▲ Fe3C, ♦ CrN, ♥ ε-Fe2-3(N,C)

Bild 3. Beugungsmuster der durch Nitrocarburieren mit unterschiedlichen Kohlungskennzahlen erzeugten Verbindungsschichten für den Werkstoff EN31CrMoV9 nach elektrochemischem Abtrag; ■ γ‘-Fe4N, ● Fe-alpha, ▲ Fe3C, ♦ CrN, ♥ ε-Fe2-3(N,C)

Fig. 4 Cementite fractions of the compound layers produced by gas nitrocarburizing shown in Table 4 for the materials EN31CrMoV9 and EN42CrMo4Bild 4. Zementitanteile der durch Gasnitrocarburieren erzeugten Verbindungsschichten, dargestellt in Tabelle 4 für die Werkstoffe EN31CrMoV9 und EN42CrMo4

Fig. 4

Cementite fractions of the compound layers produced by gas nitrocarburizing shown in Table 4 for the materials EN31CrMoV9 and EN42CrMo4

Bild 4. Zementitanteile der durch Gasnitrocarburieren erzeugten Verbindungsschichten, dargestellt in Tabelle 4 für die Werkstoffe EN31CrMoV9 und EN42CrMo4

Table 4

Nitriding hardness depth (NHD), compound layer thickness (CLT) and porous layer thickness (CLTP) for materials EN31CrMoV9 and EN42CrMo4 after nitrocarburizing 14 h at 570 °C with rN = 3.5 bar-1/2 and varying carburizing potential

Tabelle 4. Nitrierhärtetiefe (NHD), Verbindungsschichtdicke (CLT) und Porenschichtdicke (CLTP) für die Werkstoffe EN31CrMoV9 und EN42CrMo4 nach 14 h Nitrocarburieren bei 570 °C mit KN = 3,5 bar-1/2 und unterschiedlicher Kohlungskennzahl

Material rCB [bar] NHD [mm] CLT [μm] CLTP [μm]
EN31CrMoV9 0.0 0.36 13.6 4.5
0.1 0.46 26.2 7.3
0.2 0.43 21.6 9.3
0.3 0.36 18.5 8.4
EN42CrMo4 0.0 0.40 29.1 10.3
0.1 0.46 35.9 9.1
0.2 0.50 29.8 9.9
0.3 0.44 27.7 9.1
Fig. 5 Cross sections etched in nital of specimens EN31CrMoV9, nitrocarburized at 570 °C, 14 h, rN = 3.5 bar-1/2, with varied carburizing potentials (a) rCB = 0.0 bar; (b) rCB = 0.1 bar; (c) rCB = 0.2 bar; (d) rCB = 0.3 barBild 5. In Nital geätzte Querschnitte von Proben EN31CrMoV9, nitrocarburiert bei 570 °C, 14 h, KN = 3,5 bar-1/2, mit unterschiedlichen Aufkohlungspotentialen (a) KCB = 0,0 bar; (b) KCB = 0,1 bar; (c) KCB = 0,2 bar; (d) KCB = 0,3 bar

Fig. 5

Cross sections etched in nital of specimens EN31CrMoV9, nitrocarburized at 570 °C, 14 h, rN = 3.5 bar-1/2, with varied carburizing potentials (a) rCB = 0.0 bar; (b) rCB = 0.1 bar; (c) rCB = 0.2 bar; (d) rCB = 0.3 bar

Bild 5. In Nital geätzte Querschnitte von Proben EN31CrMoV9, nitrocarburiert bei 570 °C, 14 h, KN = 3,5 bar-1/2, mit unterschiedlichen Aufkohlungspotentialen (a) KCB = 0,0 bar; (b) KCB = 0,1 bar; (c) KCB = 0,2 bar; (d) KCB = 0,3 bar

Fig. 6 Cross sections etched in nital of specimens EN42CrMo4, nitrocarburized at 570 °C, 14 h, rN = 3.5 bar-1/2, with varied carburizing potentials (a) rCB = 0.0 bar; (b) rCB = 0.1 bar; (c) rCB = 0.2 bar; (d) rCB = 0.3 barBild 6. In Nital geätzte Querschnitte von Proben EN42CrMo4, nitrocarburiert bei 570 °C, 14 h, KN = 3,5 bar-1/2, mit unterschiedlichen Kohlungskennzahlen (a) KCB = 0,0 bar; (b) KCB = 0,1 bar; (c) KCB = 0,2 bar; (d) KCB = 0,3 bar

Fig. 6

Cross sections etched in nital of specimens EN42CrMo4, nitrocarburized at 570 °C, 14 h, rN = 3.5 bar-1/2, with varied carburizing potentials (a) rCB = 0.0 bar; (b) rCB = 0.1 bar; (c) rCB = 0.2 bar; (d) rCB = 0.3 bar

Bild 6. In Nital geätzte Querschnitte von Proben EN42CrMo4, nitrocarburiert bei 570 °C, 14 h, KN = 3,5 bar-1/2, mit unterschiedlichen Kohlungskennzahlen (a) KCB = 0,0 bar; (b) KCB = 0,1 bar; (c) KCB = 0,2 bar; (d) KCB = 0,3 bar

The increase in porosity can be explained with an increase in carbon concentration within the compound layer. In interstitial solid solution phases, carbon and nitrogen compete for the same interstitial sites. Therefore the addition of carbon to a nitrogen-containing phase increases the nitrogen activity. This in turn promotes pore formation (and the formation of pore channels), and more so the higher the amount of carbon added. Thus, more molecular nitrogen is formed, leading to more pores.

Due to the high thickness of the compound layers after nitrocarburizing it was not possible to determine the nitride phase composition by X-ray diffraction over the entire compound layer thickness. With chromium Kα radiation, only the first 3–6 μm contribute mainly to the diffracted signal. For thicker compound layers it would be necessary to conduct repeated electrochemical etching and successive measurements between the removal steps. As an alternative specific metallographic etching methods and GD-OES can help to discuss the phase composition of thick compound layers [17].

Figure 7 and Figure 8 show the GD-OES analyses of the nitrided and nitrocarburized samples EN31CrMoV9 and EN42CrMo4. The nitrogen profiles of the nitrided and nitrocarburized samples EN-31CrMoV9 and EN42CrMo4 show that the concentration of nitrogen increases with the addition of a carbon donator. The carbon profiles of the material EN31CrMoV9 in Figure 6 show that the carbon concentration in the compound layer increases with an increase in the carburizing potential too, thus decreasing the compound layer thickness. In comparison, the GD-OES analysis in Figure 7 of the nitrided and nitrocarburized EN42CrMo4 shows the same trends, but the carbon concentrations within the compound layer are lower. Again, a decrease in compound layer thickness with increasing carbon concentration in the compound layer was observed. The location of the carbon maximum is found towards the interface of the compound layer while increasing carbon content with more pronounced plateau is achieved with increasing rCB value.

Fig. 7 (a) Nitrogen and (b) carbon depth profiles of the samples EN31CrMoV9, nitrided and nitrocarburized at 570 °C for 14 h with rN = 3.5 bar-1/2Bild 7 (a) Stickstoff- und (b) Kohlenstoff-Tiefenprofile der Proben EN31CrMoV9, nitriert und nitrocarburiert bei 570 °C für 14 h mit KN = 3,5 bar-1/2

Fig. 7

(a) Nitrogen and (b) carbon depth profiles of the samples EN31CrMoV9, nitrided and nitrocarburized at 570 °C for 14 h with rN = 3.5 bar-1/2

Bild 7 (a) Stickstoff- und (b) Kohlenstoff-Tiefenprofile der Proben EN31CrMoV9, nitriert und nitrocarburiert bei 570 °C für 14 h mit KN = 3,5 bar-1/2

Fig. 8 (a) Nitrogen and (b) carbon depth profiles of the samples EN42CrMo4, nitrided and nitrocarburized at 570 °C for 14 h with rN = 3.5 bar-1/2Bild 8. (a) Stickstoff- und (b) Kohlenstoff-Tiefenprofile der Proben EN42CrMo4, nitriert und nitrocarburiert bei 570 °C für 14 h mit KN = 3,5 bar-1/2

Fig. 8

(a) Nitrogen and (b) carbon depth profiles of the samples EN42CrMo4, nitrided and nitrocarburized at 570 °C for 14 h with rN = 3.5 bar-1/2

Bild 8. (a) Stickstoff- und (b) Kohlenstoff-Tiefenprofile der Proben EN42CrMo4, nitriert und nitrocarburiert bei 570 °C für 14 h mit KN = 3,5 bar-1/2

Figure 9 and Figure 10 show cross sections of the nitrided and nitrocarburized samples EN31CrMoV9 and EN42CrMo4 with varying carburizing potential. Murakami etching was used to assess the proportions and distribution of the γ’- and ε-phases. This etchant is suitable for the visualization of phases with high carbon contents which are colored brown. On the nitrided sample carbon accumulations, which largely result from the decarburization of the diffusion layer during nitriding in the compound layer can also be observed at the bottom of the compound layer. On the nitrocarburized samples the compound layer is completely colored by Murakami etchant, which can be explained by the high carbon content being a result of nitrocarburizing. Thus, the metallographic investigations using the special etching by Murakami are in agreement with the GD-OES analyses showed in Figure 6 and Figure 7.

Fig. 9 Cross sections of specimens EN42CrMo4 etched in Murakami etchant, nitrocarburized at 570 °C, 14 h, rN = 3.5 bar-1/2, with varied carburizing potentials (a) rCB = 0.0 bar; (b) rCB = 0.1 bar; (c) rCB = 0.2 bar; (d) rCB = 0.3 barBild 9. Querschliffe von Proben EN42CrMo4, geätzt in Murakami-Ätzmittel, nitrocarburiert bei 570 °C, 14 h, KN = 3,5 bar-1/2, mit unterschiedlichen Kohlungskennzahlen (a) KCB = 0,0 bar; (b) KCB = 0,1 bar; (c) KCB = 0,2 bar; (d) KCB = 0,3 bar

Fig. 9

Cross sections of specimens EN42CrMo4 etched in Murakami etchant, nitrocarburized at 570 °C, 14 h, rN = 3.5 bar-1/2, with varied carburizing potentials (a) rCB = 0.0 bar; (b) rCB = 0.1 bar; (c) rCB = 0.2 bar; (d) rCB = 0.3 bar

Bild 9. Querschliffe von Proben EN42CrMo4, geätzt in Murakami-Ätzmittel, nitrocarburiert bei 570 °C, 14 h, KN = 3,5 bar-1/2, mit unterschiedlichen Kohlungskennzahlen (a) KCB = 0,0 bar; (b) KCB = 0,1 bar; (c) KCB = 0,2 bar; (d) KCB = 0,3 bar

Fig. 10 Cross sections of specimens EN42CrMo4 etched in Murakami etchant, nitrocarburized at 570 °C, 14 h, rN = 3.5 bar-1/2, with varied carburizing potentials (a) rCB = 0.0 bar; (b) rCB = 0.1 bar; (c) rCB = 0.2 bar; (d) rCB = 0.3 barBild 10. Querschliffe von Proben EN42CrMo4, geätzt in Murakami-Ätzmittel, nitrocarburiert bei 570 °C, 14 h, KN = 3,5 bar-1/2, mit unterschiedlichen Kohlungskennzahlen (a) KCB = 0,0 bar; (b) KCB = 0,1 bar; (c) KCB = 0,2 bar; (d) KCB = 0,3 bar

Fig. 10

Cross sections of specimens EN42CrMo4 etched in Murakami etchant, nitrocarburized at 570 °C, 14 h, rN = 3.5 bar-1/2, with varied carburizing potentials (a) rCB = 0.0 bar; (b) rCB = 0.1 bar; (c) rCB = 0.2 bar; (d) rCB = 0.3 bar

Bild 10. Querschliffe von Proben EN42CrMo4, geätzt in Murakami-Ätzmittel, nitrocarburiert bei 570 °C, 14 h, KN = 3,5 bar-1/2, mit unterschiedlichen Kohlungskennzahlen (a) KCB = 0,0 bar; (b) KCB = 0,1 bar; (c) KCB = 0,2 bar; (d) KCB = 0,3 bar

4 Conclusions

Samples of EN31CrMoV9 and EN42CrMo4 were gas nitrided at different temperatures and nitriding potentials to produce compound layers with different amounts of γ’- and ε-nitride. The choice of nitriding potential was based on the phase boundary between the γ’- and ε-nitride phases in the Lehrer diagram. It was shown that the choice of nitriding parameters and materials resulted in compound layers of predominantly γ’-nitrides and to mixed layers within the γ’-phase field of the Lehrer diagram. It is possible to produce two-phased layers with similar nitrogen profiles, nitriding hardness depths, and compound layer thicknesses using different nitriding temperatures and nitriding potentials. Although according to the Lehrer diagram it is theoretically possible to produce compound layers of predominantly ε-nitrides by gas nitriding, this has not been successful. Pure ε-nitride compound layers could not be created on the investigated materials by nitriding in the chosen parameter range.

For the generation of compound layers with a high ε-nitride content, a carbon donator had to be added to the gas nitriding atmosphere (nitrocarburizing). It was found that an addition of a carbon donator increased concentrations of both nitrogen and carbon in the surface near zone, driving the growth of the compound layer and the diffusion zone. Furthermore, it was shown that an increase in the carburizing potential at constant temperature and nitriding potential leads to: A decreased compound layer thickness; an increase of the porosity; and, an increasing fraction of cementite towards the interface of the compound layer which is expected to inhibit the nitrogen diffusion. In the further course of the research project, procedures for producing compound layers with different amounts of the nitride phases, thickness and porosity will be transferred to test gears and their influence on the load-bearing capacity of the gears will be investigated.

1 Einleitung

Zahnräder sind wichtige Bauteile im Maschinen-, Anlagen- und Fahrzeugbau. Um ihre Belastbarkeit zu erhöhen, können Zahnräder thermochemischen Behandlungen unterzogen werden, wobei häufig eine Einsatzhärtung durch Aufkohlung erfolgt. Wenn eine erhöhte Korrosionsbeständigkeit und eine höhere Temperaturbeständigkeit erforderlich sind, kann das Nitrieren angewendet werden. Diese thermochemische Behandlung besteht in der Anreicherung der Randschicht von Werkstücken aus Eisenwerkstoffen mit Stickstoff bei Temperaturen, die unter dem Punkt liegen, an dem sich

Austenit bildet. Wenn die Randschicht sowohl mit Stickstoff als auch mit Kohlenstoff angereichert wird, spricht man vom Nitrocarburieren [1].

Die Nitrierschicht auf einem unlegierten Stahl besteht aus einer harten, oberflächennahen Verbindungsschicht und einer darunter liegenden Diffusionszone [2]. Die Verbindungsschicht besteht aus Eisennitriden, während die Diffusionszone aus Nitridausscheidungen an den Korngrenzen des Grundmaterials besteht, deren Anzahl mit zunehmendem Randabstand abnimmt. Handelt es sich bei dem Grundwerkstoff um einen legierten Vergütungsstahl, der ursprünglich aus einer ferritischen, feinkörnigen Matrix mit fein verteilten Legierungskarbiden (MxC) bestand, werden die Legierungskarbide bei Anreicherung mit Stickstoff in verschiedene Legierungsnitride (MyN) umgewandelt, da Stickstoff eine höhere Affinität zu diesen Legierungselementen hat als Kohlenstoff. Der überschüssige Kohlenstoff innerhalb der Diffusionszone entweicht zu den Korngrenzen, wo er zunächst Zementit (Fe3C) bildet und dann bei weiterer Stickstoffzugabe in die Epsilon-Phase (ε-Fe2-3(C,N)) umgewandelt wird. Die konkurrierenden Oberflächenreaktionen während des Gasnitrierens, wie die Stickstoffdiffusion in das Substrat und die Desorption von Stickstoffmolekülen von der Oberfläche, führen zu einem Anstieg der Stickstoffkonzentration an der Oberfläche. Sobald die Löslichkeitsgrenze für den Stickstoff in der Ferritmatrix überschritten ist, bilden sich dort γ’-Eisennitride (γ’-Fe4N) [3], was den Beginn des Wachstums der Verbindungsschicht markiert. Von den Nitrierparametern, insbesondere dem Nitrierpotential, hängt es dann ab, ob sich eine einphasige, nur aus γ’-Nitrid bestehende Schicht bildet. Ist das Nitrierpotential in der Gasatmosphäre hoch genug, bevor sich eine geschlossene γ’-Nitridschicht ausbildet, entstehen auf den γ’-Kernen weitere ε-Eisennitridkörner (ε-Fe2-3N). Das seitliche Wachstum solcher Zwillingskörner führt schließlich zur Ausbildung einer geschlossenen Zweiphasenschicht aus γ’- und ε-Eisennitriden in einem binären Eisen-Stickstoff-System [4]. Handelt es sich bei dem Grundwerkstoff um einen legierten Stahl, treten die γ’- und ε-Nitride typischerweise gemischt auf, oft mit γ’-Körnern, die in eine kontinuierliche ε-Phase eingebettet sind. Zusätzliche Legierungselemente können in Abhängigkeit von ihrer Gibbs-Energie zur Bildung weiterer Nitride führen, was insbesondere bei Chrom und Silizium der Fall ist [6]. Das weitere Wachstum der Verbindungs- und Diffusionsschichten wird durch den Stickstofftransport durch die Verbindungsschicht realisiert.

In der oberflächennahen Zone der Verbindungsschicht ist in der Regel Porosität zu beobachten. Die Porenbildung ist darauf zurückzuführen, dass es sich beim Nitrieren und Nitrocarburieren um Nichtgleichgewichtsprozesse handelt, bei denen der Stickstoff durch Reaktion mit instabilem Ammoniak in der Stahloberfläche in einen Mischkristall gezwungen wird. In dem entstehenden Mischkristall herrscht eine starke Übersättigung des Stickstoffs im Verhältnis zum molekularen Stickstoff bei Atmosphärendruck, was zu einem hohen Gleichgewichtsstickstoffdruck führt. Dieser hohe Druck stellt eine starke “treibende Kraft” für die Porenbildung dar. Sobald dieser Druck hoch genug ist, neigen die metastabilen Eisen-Nitrid-Phasen in der Verbin

dungsschicht dazu, zu Eisen und molekularem Stickstoffgas zu dissoziieren, was als die häufigste Ursache für die Porenbildung angesehen wird [7]. In den meisten Fällen findet diese Zersetzung der Nitride an den Korngrenzen innerhalb der Verbindungsschicht statt, was zur Bildung längerer Porenketten [7] und zur Denitrierung der obersten Oberflächenschicht des Werkstoffs führen kann. Die Bildung eines porösen Teils in der Verbindungsschicht ist schwer zu vermeiden [1]. Da die Stickstoffkonzentration in Oberflächennähe am höchsten ist, findet die Porenbildung am ehesten in den dortigen Eisennitridphasen (meist ε-Nitride) statt. Außerdem korreliert eine zunehmende Nitrierdauer mit der Zunahme der Poren in der Verbindungsschicht, zusätzlich zur Zunahme der Verbindungsschichtdicke (CLT). In den Anfangsstadien eines Nitrierprozesses dominiert die Diffusion von Stickstoffatomen in die tieferen Zonen des Materials gegenüber der Assoziation von Stickstoffatomen zu Stickstoffgasmolekülen. Daher ist es möglich, durch kurze Prozessdauern porenfreie dünne Verbindungsschichten zu erzeugen. Aus energetischen Gründen bilden sich Poren meist an den Korngrenzen, können zusammenwachsen und so Kanäle bilden. Beim Gasnitrieren kann Stickstoffgas über die Kanäle aus dem nitrierten Werkstoff ausströmen.

Frühere Untersuchungen haben gezeigt, dass das Verschleißverhalten von Zahnrädern hauptsächlich durch die Zusammensetzung und den Aufbau der Verbindungsschicht beeinflusst wird [9]. Der Einfluss der Verbindungsschicht auf die Tragfähigkeit ist noch nicht bekannt. Ziel der vorliegenden Untersuchungen ist es daher, den Zusammenhang zwischen den Verbindungsschichteigenschaften (Dicke, Phasenzusammensetzung und Porosität) und der Tragfähigkeit zu ermitteln. Durch verschiedene Nitrierwärmebehandlungen wie Gasnitrieren und Gasnitrocarburieren lassen sich verschiedene reproduzierbare Verbindungsschichteigenschaften erzeugen. Zukünftiges Ziel ist es, eine anforderungsgerechte Parametermatrix für die Verbindungsschichtauslegung zu erstellen, sodass nitrierte Zahnräder mit erhöhter Tragfähigkeit hergestellt werden können.

2 Materialien und Methoden

2.1 Probenvorbereitung

Ausgewählt wurden der gängige Nitrierstahl EN31CrMoV9 (1.8519) mit 0,31 ma.% C, 2,50 ma.% Cr, 0,20 ma.% Mo und 0,15 ma.% V und der Vergütungsstahl EN42CrMo4 (1.7225; AISI 4140) mit 0,42 ma.% C, 1,10 ma.% Cr und 0,25 ma.% Mo.

Die Werkstoffe wurden vor dem Nitrieren vergütet. Der Werkstoff EN31CrMoV9 wurde bei 870 °C austenitisiert, in Öl abgeschreckt und bei 620 °C im Vakuum angelassen. Die vorherige Wärmebehandlung für EN42CrMo4 wurde mit einer Austenitisierungstemperatur von 860 °C, einer Ölabschreckung und einem Anlassen bei 620 °C durchgeführt, um einen ähnlichen Gefügezustand herzustellen.

Die Proben wurden vor den Nitrierbehandlungen gleitgeschliffen, um Verunreinigungen und Oxidschichten von den Oberflächen zu entfernen und sie für das Nitrieren zu aktivieren. Zu diesem Zweck wurden die Proben zusammen mit einem Schleifmittel für mehrere Stunden in eine rotierende Trommel gegeben.

2.2 Nitrier- und Nitrocarburierbehandlung für verschiedene Verbindungsschichten

Die Nitrier- und Nitrocarburierbehandlungen (Tabelle 1) wurden in einer Gasnitrieranlage mit Nitrier- und Kohlungskennzahlregelung durchgeführt. Die Erwärmung erfolgte unter Ammoniakatmosphäre und unter Zugabe von dissoziiertem Ammoniak, der zuvor in einem Cracker (Spaltgas) vollständig zersetzt worden war, um das Nitrierpotential zu steuern. Die Probenoberfläche wird während des Erwärmens durch das Ammoniak aktiviert. Die Abkühlung nach dem Nitrieren erfolgte ebenfalls phasengeregelt durch Zugabe von gecracktem Ammoniakgas unter Berücksichtigung des Lehrer-Diagramms [1], um den Stickstoffaustritt und die damit verbundene Denitrierung am Ende des Prozesses zu vermeiden.

Die Phasenzusammensetzung der Verbindungsschicht wurde in systematischen Experimenten variiert. Ziel war es, neben reinen γ’-Nitrid-Verbindungsschichten auch reine ε-Nitrid-Verbindungsschichten sowie Mischschichten aus γ’- und ε-Nitrid zu erzeugen. In der Verbindungsschicht tritt fast immer eine poröse Zone auf. Um den Einfluss der Porosität auf die Tragfähigkeit der Zahnräder zu untersuchen, konzentrierten sich die Untersuchungen zur Nitrierbehandlung auch auf die Variation der Porosität der Verbindungsschicht durch unterschiedliche Nitrierbedingungen.

Die Wahl der Nitrierkennzahl für die Nitrierprozesse orientiert sich an der Phasengrenze zwischen der γ’- und der ε-Nitridphase im Lehrer-Diagramm, das für binäre Fe-N-Systeme gültig ist. Da das

Lehrer-Diagramm die Existenzbereiche der Nitridphasen in reinem Eisen beim Gasnitrieren darstellt, ist davon auszugehen, dass sich die Phasengrenzen bei Anwesenheit von Kohlenstoff und nitridbildenden Legierungselementen zu höheren Nitrierkennzahlen verschieben. In der ersten Versuchsreihe zum Verbindungsschichtaufbau lag der Schwerpunkt zunächst auf der Erzeugung von Verbindungsschichten aus nahezu reinen γ’-Nitriden. Dazu wurden die Nitrierkennzahlen für die Nitriertemperaturen 520 °C, 550 °C und 570 °C so gewählt, dass die Phasengrenzen zwischen den Nitridphasen im binären System Eisen-Stickstoff getroffen wurden (KN = 1,8 bar-1/2 bei 520 °C, KN = 1,4 bar-1/2 bei 550 °C und KN = 1,0 bar-1/2 bei 570 °C). In einer weiteren Versuchsreihe zur Phasenzusammensetzung wurden die Nitrierkennzahlen mit dem Ziel erhöht, die γ’-Nitrid- und ε-Nitrid-Phasenanteile auf ähnliche Werte zu bringen, um Mischschichten zu erzeugen und größere Verbindungsschichtdicken zu erreichen. Eine dritte Versuchsreihe mit noch höheren Nitrierkennzahlen wurde durchgeführt, um Verbindungsschichten zu erhalten, die überwiegend aus ε-Nitriden bestehen.

Die mit der Nitriertemperatur korrelierende Nitrierdauer wurde auf der Grundlage früherer Untersuchungen an dem Werkstoff EN31CrMoV9 abgeschätzt [10]. Ziel war es, eine einheitliche Nitrierhärtetiefe (NHD) von 0,3‒0,4 mm für alle Proben zu erreichen, da eine Mindestnitrierhärtetiefe von ca. 0,4 mm notwendig ist, um einen Einfluss der Nitrierhärtetiefe bei Verzahnungsversuchen auszuschließen. Die effektive Anforderung an die Nitrierhärtetiefe ergibt sich aus dem Spannungsverlauf der Hertzschen Pressung über der Bauteilrandschicht, deren maximale Vergleichsspannung je nach Belastung und Kontaktgeometrie in einer Tiefe von 0,1 bis 0,4 mm liegt. Aufgrund des geringeren Gehalts an Legierungselementen des Werkstoffs EN42CrMo4 wird für diesen Werkstoff eine höhere Nitrierhärtetiefe erwartet.

2.3 Untersuchungsmethoden

Die Verbindungsschichteigenschaften wie Phasenzusammensetzung, Porensaum und Konzentrationsverteilung der Elemente haben erhebliche Auswirkungen auf die mechanischen Eigenschaften der Verbindungsschichten. Um alle Zusammenhänge zwischen Verbindungsschicht und Tragfähigkeit zu ermitteln, wurden die Verbindungsschichten umfassend charakterisiert. Neben der Standardanalyse (Querschliff mit Nitalätzung und Härteverlauf) wurde die Phasenzusammensetzung der Verbindungsschicht durch spezielle Ätzungen, Röntgenbeugung (XRD) und optische Glimmentladungsemissionsspektrometrie (GDOES) bestimmt.

2.3.1 Sonderätzungen

Für die optische Trennung von Verbindungsschicht und Diffusionsschicht wird standardmäßig die Nital-Ätzung verwendet. Dieses Ätzmittel greift die Verbindungsschicht weniger an, sodass sie unter dem Lichtmikroskop weiß erscheint. Für die Untersuchungen in der vorliegenden Arbeit wurde eine 3 %ige alkoholische HNO3- Lösung als Standard verwendet. Um nicht nur Informationen über die Dicke der Verbindungsschicht und des Porensaums, sondern auch über die Phasenzusammensetzung und -verteilung zu erhalten, wurden zusätzliche Ätzmethoden eingesetzt. Um die Nitrid- und Kohlenstoffkonzentrationen in der Verbindungsschicht sichtbar zu machen, wurde das Ätzmittel nach Murakami angewendet. Detaillierte Informationen zu den in dieser Arbeit verwendeten Ätzmitteln und Ätzmethoden finden sich in Tabelle 2.

2.3.2 Röntgenbeugung (XRD)

Zur Bestimmung der Phasenkomponenten der Verbindungsschicht wurde die Röntgenbeugung eingesetzt. Die Beugungsmuster wurden mit einem θ/2θ-Diffraktometer des Typs MZ VI E von GE Inspection Technologies mit Chrom Kα-Strahlung und einem Primärstrahl von etwa 2 mm Durchmesser gemessen. Ein 2θ-Winkelbereich von 50° bis 164° wurde mit einem positionsempfindlichen Detektor, der mit einem Vanadium kβ-Filter ausgestattet war, bei einer Schrittweite von 0,05° und einer Gesamtzeit von 2 Stunden für jede Messung gemessen. Die quantitative Analyse der Beugungsmuster wurde nach der Rietveld-Methode mit der Software TOPAS 4.2 von Bruker-AXS durchgeführt. Bei dieser Methode wird das gesamte Beugungsmuster polykristalliner Materialien unter Berücksichtigung des instrumentellen Beitrags und physikalisch basierter Daten über die Kristallstruktur der vorliegenden Phasen sowie mikrostruktureller Parameter wie Kristallitgröße und Mikrodehnungen angepasst [14]. Textur- und Eigenspannungseffekte auf die Beugungsmuster können mit dieser Methode ebenfalls berücksichtigt werden. Bei den vorliegenden Analysen wurden folgende Phasen berücksichtigt: ε-Fe2-3N und γ’-Fe4N, CrN, Fe3C und das α-Fe-Substrat.

Die Eindringtiefe des Röntgenstrahls hängt von der Wellenlänge der verwendeten Strahlung und vom untersuchten Material ab und variiert je nach geometrischer Anordnung für die Messungen. Bei Chrom Kα-Strahlung in Fe-basierten Materialien beträgt die standardisierte Eindringtiefe, definiert als der Bereich aus dem 63 % des aufgezeichneten Signals erzeugt werden, 3 bis 6 μm [15]. Es werden jedoch auch Signale aus tieferen Bereichen bis zu etwa 15‒20 μm zum Detektor gebeugt. Da die derzeit untersuchten Verbindungsschichten hohe chemische und mikrostrukturelle Gradienten entlang der Tiefe aufweisen, muss die Integration über die Tiefe bei der Dateninterpretation sorgfältig berücksichtigt werden.

2.3.3 Optische Glimmentladungs-Emissionsspektrometrie (GDOES)

Die GDOES-Analyse wurde mit einem Gerät vom Typ LECO GDS750A zur Bestimmung der Elementkonzentrationen über die

Nitrierschicht mit hoher Tiefenauflösung durchgeführt. Durch kontinuierliches Argon-Sputtern ist es möglich, die zeit- und damit tiefenabhängige chemische Zusammensetzung zu untersuchen. Dies ermöglicht es, bestimmte Parameter der Verbindungsschicht, wie z. B. die Verbindungsschichtdicke, abzuschätzen und auch begrenzte Aussagen über die Phasenzusammensetzung anhand der Stickstoffkonzentration der verschiedenen Nitride zu treffen. Der kreisförmige Analysebereich entspricht dem Durchmesser des Brennflecks (4 mm bei den in dieser Arbeit gezeigten Versuchsergebnissen) während der Messung. Damit lassen sich zwar die Elementkonzentrationsprofile einzelner Elemente mit hoher statistischer Genauigkeit erfassen, aber keine direkten Informationen über die enthaltenen Phasen gewinnen.

3 Ergebnisse und Diskussion

3.1 Nitrierbehandlungen

Die nach den Nitrierversuchen ermittelten Nitrierhärtetiefen sind in Tabelle 3 dargestellt. Wie erwartet, führten die Nitrierprozesse bei 520 °C, 550 °C und 570 °C zu ähnlichen Nitrierhärtetiefen von 0,3–0,4 mm für den Werkstoff EN31CrMoV9. Ähnliche Nitrierhärtetiefen wurden auch für die Sorte EN42CrMo4 erzielt (0,4–0,5 mm), die erwartungsgemäß höher sind als die Werte der Nitrierhärtetiefen von EN31CrMoV9, da in EN42CrMo4 weniger nitridbildende Legierungselemente enthalten sind und die Wachstumsrate der Diffusionszone im Vergleich zu EN31CrMoV9 höher ist. Die Dicke der Verbindungsschicht und des porösen Teils der Verbindungsschicht nach dem Nitrieren bei verschiedenen Temperaturen und mit unterschiedlicher Nitrierkennzahl ist in Bild 1 dargestellt. Wie erwartet, nimmt die Dicke der Verbindungsschicht bei beiden Werkstoffen mit steigender Nitrierkennzahl und steigender Temperatur zu. Aufgrund des geringeren Gehalts an nitridbildenden Elementen ist die Verbindungsschichtdicke des Werk-

stoffs EN42CrMo4 nach der gleichen Nitrierbehandlung höher als beim Werkstoff EN31CrMoV9. Da EN42CrMo4 einen höheren Grundkohlenstoffgehalt und weniger nitridbildende Legierungselemente aufweist, konnten höhere ε-Nitridgehalte erzielt werden, wie in Bild 2b zu sehen ist. In der ersten Versuchsreihe an der Phasengrenze des binären Systems konnte bereits bei 550 °C Nitriertemperatur eine Mischverbindungsschicht mit nahezu gleichen γ’- und ε-Nitridgehalten erzeugt werden. Der ε-Nitrid-Gehalt konnte durch Erhöhung der Nitrierkennzahl weiter auf über 60 % gesteigert werden, bevor eine weitere Erhöhung der Nitrierkennzahl keinen Einfluss mehr auf die ε-Nitridbildung hatte, sondern zu einer Zunahme der γ’-Nitride führte. Bei den anderen Nitriertemperaturen 520 °C und 570 °C konnte erst in der zweiten Versuchsreihe bei einer mittleren Nitrierkennzahl ein überwiegender Anteil an ε-Nitriden erzielt werden. Auch hier zeigte die weitere Erhöhung der Nitrierkennzahl eine Abnahme der ε-Nitride und eine Zunahme der γ’-Nitride in der Verbindungsschicht. Mögliche Ursachen für den scheinbar abnehmenden ε-Nitrid-Gehalt bei einer höheren Nitriertemperatur von 570 °C wurden bereits für den Werkstoff EN31CrMoV9 diskutiert, wobei auf eine zunehmende Entkohlung mit steigender Temperatur und den möglichen Einfluss der Porenbildung hingewiesen wurde. Darüber hinaus zeigten die Versuchsreihen bei EN42CrMo4 im Phasenbereich des ε-Nitrids des binären Systems deutlich dickere Verbindungsschichten von bis zu 30 μm im Vergleich zu weniger als 15 μm bei EN31CrMoV9. Daher erfasst die XRD-Analysemethode, die hauptsächlich über wenige Mikrometer integriert, nicht den gleichen Anteil der Verbindungsschichtdicke in beiden Werkstoffen, was zu Unterschieden in den jeweiligen Phasengehalten führt.

3.2 Nitrocarburierbehandlungen

Um den ε-Nitrid-Gehalt dennoch zu erhöhen, wurde in ausgewählten Prozessen ein Nitrocarburiereng durch Zugabe eines Kohlenstoffspenders in die Nitrieratmosphäre durchgeführt (geregelte Kohlungskennzahl über Boudouard-Gleichgewicht KCB und Einsatz von CO und CO2) [6].

Eine Reihe von Versuchen wurde bei 570 °C unter Variation der Kohlungskennzahl durchgeführt. Die Dauer der Behandlungen betrug 14 h und die Nitrierkennzahl wurde auf KN = 3,5 bar-1/2 eingestellt. Da die Diffusion von Kohlenstoff nicht nur das Wachstum der Verbindungsschicht fördert, sondern auch zur Bildung von Zementit führen kann, wurde der Zementitgehalt mittels XRD bestimmt. Zunächst wurden Messungen direkt von der Oberfläche der Proben durchgeführt, wobei der ermittelte Zementitgehalt in allen Fällen eher gering war (2 bis maximal 6 ma.-% für die höchste Kohlungskennzahl). Nach Betrachtung der mittels GDOES ermittelten Elementtiefenprofile, die eine maximale Kohlenstoffkonzentration in einer Tiefe von 10 bis 25 μm unter der Oberfläche zeigten, wurden zusätzliche XRD-Messungen nach elektrochemischem Abtrag bis zu einer Tiefe von etwa 10 μm für alle Proben durchgeführt. Die Beugungsmuster für den Werkstoff EN31CrMoV9 sind in Bild 3 beispielhaft dargestellt. Sie zeigen deutlich die Zunahme der Zementitpeaks mit steigender Kohlungskennzahl, während die Nitridpeaks allmählich abnehmen. Der starke Anstieg des Zementitgehalts der gasnitrocarburierten Proben mit zunehmender Kohlungskennzahl ist für beide Werkstoffe in Bild 4 zusammengefasst. Extrem hohe Zementitgehalte mit einer Tendenz zu etwa 90 % ergeben sich für die höchste Kohlungskennzahl. Aus Tabelle 4 ist ersichtlich, dass die Verbindungsschichtdicke mit zunehmender Kohlungskennzahl abnimmt. Die Zementitbildung wirkt sich verzögernd auf die Stickstoffdiffusion aus, indem eine nahezu stöchiometrische Zementitschicht die Stickstoffdiffusion behindert [16], wodurch die resultierende Verbindungsschichtdicke verringert wird. Insbesondere wenn eine Phase mit niedrigem Diffusionsvermögen und/oder niedrigem Löslichkeitsbereich eine zusammenhängende Schicht innerhalb der Verbindungsschicht bildet, wird dadurch der Diffusionsfluss von der Oberfläche nach innen („mechanisch“) gebremst. Darüber hinaus kann die Zementitbildung auch die Nitrierhärtetiefe beeinflussen. In den vorliegenden Untersuchungen trat eine Abnahme der Nitrierhärtetiefe erst bei einer Kohlungskennzahl von KCB = 0,3 bar auf. Die resultierenden Nitrierhärtetiefen der Verfahren mit niedrigeren Kohlungskennzahlen (0,1 bar und 0,2 bar) sind etwas höher als die resultierenden Nitrierhärtetiefen aus dem Gasnitrierverfahren. Bild 5 und Bild 6 zeigen die Verbindungsschichten der mit Nital geätzten Werkstoffe EN31CrMoV9 und EN42CrMo4. Nach Tabelle 4 ist die Porensaumdicke beim Nitrocarburieren mit unterschiedlichen Kohlungskennzahlen etwa gleich groß, aber aus den Querschnitten ist ersichtlich, dass sich die Porosität über einen größeren Teil der Verbindungsschichtdicke erstreckt.

Der Anstieg der Porosität lässt sich mit einer Zunahme der Kohlenstoffkonzentration innerhalb der Verbindungsschicht erklären. In interstitiellen Mischkristallphasen konkurrieren Kohlenstoff und Stickstoff um die gleichen interstitiellen Plätze. Dies führt dazu, dass die Zugabe von Kohlenstoff zu einer stickstoffhaltigen Phase die Stickstoffaktivität erhöht. Dies wiederum fördert die Porenbildung (und die Bildung von Porenkanälen), und zwar umso mehr, je mehr Kohlenstoff hinzugefügt wird. Es wird also mehr molekularer Stickstoff gebildet, was zu mehr Poren führt.

Wegen der hohen Verbindungsschichtdicke nach dem Nitrocarburieren war es nicht möglich, die Zusammensetzung der Nitridphasen durch Röntgenbeugung über die gesamte Verbindungsschichtdicke zu bestimmen. Bei der Chrom Kα-Strahlung tragen nur die ersten 3‒6 μm hauptsächlich zum Beugungssignal bei. Für dickere Verbindungsschichten müssten wiederholte elektrochemische Abträge und aufeinander folgende Messungen zwischen den Abtragsschritten durchgeführt werden. Als Alternative können spezifische metallographische Ätzmethoden und GDOES helfen, die Phasenzusammensetzung dicker Verbindungsschichten zu erörtern [17].

Bild 7 und Bild 8 zeigen die GDOES-Analysen der nitrierten und nitrocarburierten Proben EN31CrMoV9 und EN42CrMo4. Die Stickstoffprofile der nitrierten und nitrocarburierten Proben EN31CrMoV9 und EN42CrMo4 zeigen, dass die Stickstoffkonzentration mit der Zugabe eines Kohlenstoffspenders zunimmt. Die

Kohlenstoffprofile des Werkstoffs EN31CrMoV9 in Bild 6 zeigen, dass die Kohlenstoffkonzentration in der Verbindungsschicht mit einer Erhöhung der Kohlungskennzahl ebenfalls zunimmt, wodurch die Verbindungsschichtdicke abnimmt. Im Vergleich dazu zeigt die GDOES-Analyse in Bild 7 des nitrierten und nitrocarburierten EN42CrMo4 die gleichen Tendenzen, aber die Kohlenstoffkonzentrationen in der Verbindungsschicht sind geringer. Auch hier wurde eine Abnahme der Verbundschichtdicke mit zunehmender Kohlenstoffkonzentration in der Verbundschicht beobachtet. Das Kohlenstoffmaximum befindet sich an der Grenzfläche der Verbindungsschicht, wobei mit steigendem KCB-Wert ein zunehmender Kohlenstoffgehalt mit ausgeprägterem Plateau erreicht wird.

Bild 9 und Bild 10 zeigen Querschliffe der nitrierten und nitrocarburierten Proben EN31CrMoV9 und EN42CrMo4 mit unterschiedlichen Kohlungskennzahlen. Zur Bewertung der Anteile und der Verteilung der γ’- und ε-Phasen wurde die Murakami-Ätzung verwendet. Dieses Ätzmittel eignet sich für die Sichtbarmachung von Phasen mit hohem Kohlenstoffgehalt, die braun ge

färbt sind. Bei der nitrierten Probe sind Kohlenstoffanreicherungen, die größtenteils auf die Entkohlung der Diffusionsschicht beim Nitrieren in der Verbindungsschicht zurückzuführen sind, auch im unteren Bereich der Verbindungsschicht zu beobachten. Bei den nitrocarburierten Proben ist die Verbindungsschicht durch das Murakami-Ätzmittel vollständig eingefärbt, was sich durch den hohen Kohlenstoffgehalt als Folge des Nitrocarburierens erklären lässt. Die metallographischen Untersuchungen mit der speziellen Murakami-Ätzung stimmen also mit den GDOES-Analysen in Bild 6 und Bild 7 überein.

4 Schlussfolgerungen

Proben von EN31CrMoV9 und EN42CrMo4 wurden bei verschiedenen Temperaturen und Nitrierkennzahlen gasnitriert, um Verbindungsschichten mit unterschiedlichen Mengen an γ’- und ε-Nitrid zu erzeugen. Die Wahl der Nitrierkennzahlen basierte auf der Lage der Phasengrenzen zwischen der γ’- und der ε-Nitridphase im Lehrer-Diagramm. Es wurde gezeigt, dass die Wahl der Nitrierparameter und der Werkstoffe zu Verbindungsschichten aus überwiegend γ’-Nitriden und zu Mischschichten innerhalb des γ’-Phasenfeldes des Lehrer-Diagramms führt. Mit unterschiedlichen Nitriertemperaturen und Nitrierkennzahlen lassen sich zweiphasige Schichten mit ähnlichen Stickstoffprofilen, Nitrierhärtetiefen und Verbindungsschichtdicken erzeugen. Obwohl es nach dem Lehrer-Diagramm theoretisch möglich ist, Verbindungsschichten aus überwiegend ε-Nitriden durch Gasnitrieren zu erzeugen, ist dies nicht gelungen. Reine ε-Nitrid-Verbindungsschichten konnten auf den untersuchten Werkstoffen durch Nitrieren im gewählten Parameterbereich nicht erzeugt werden.

Zur Erzeugung von Verbindungsschichten mit einem hohen ε-Nitridanteil musste der Gasnitrieratmosphäre (Nitrocarburieren) ein Kohlenstoffspender zugesetzt werden. Es wurde festgestellt, dass die Zugabe eines Kohlenstoffspenders die Konzentrationen von Stickstoff und Kohlenstoff in der oberflächennahen Zone erhöht, wodurch das Wachstum der Verbindungsschicht und der Diffusionszone gefördert wird. Außerdem wurde gezeigt, dass eine Erhöhung der Kohlungskennzahl bei konstanter Temperatur und Nitrierkennzahl zu folgenden Ergebnissen führt: Eine verringerte Verbindungsschichtdicke, eine Erhöhung der Porosität und ein zunehmender Anteil an Zementit im unteren Bereich der Verbindungsschicht, der wahrscheinlich den weiteren Stickstofftransport hemmt. Im weiteren Verlauf des Forschungsvorhabens werden Verfahren zur Herstellung von Verbindungsschichten mit unterschiedlichen Anteilen der Nitridphasen, Dicken und Porositäten auf Versuchszahnräder übertragen und deren Einfluss auf die Tragfähigkeit der Zahnräder untersucht.

Acknowledgments

Author contribution: All the authors have accepted responsibility for the entire content of this submitted manuscript and approved submission.

Research funding: The project IGF 20067 was funded by the AiF (Arbeitsgemeinschaft industrieller Forschungsvereinigungen „Otto von Guericke“ e. V.) through financial ressources from the BMWK (Bundesministerium für Wirtschaft und Klimaschutz).

Conflict of interest statement: The authors declare no conflicts of interest regarding this article.

Danksagungen

Beitrag der Autoren: Alle Autoren haben die Verantwortung für den gesamten Inhalt dieses eingereichten Manuskripts übernommen und die Einreichung genehmigt.

Finanzierung der Forschung: Das Projekt IGF 20067 wurde von der AiF (Arbeitsgemeinschaft industrieller Forschungsvereinigungen "Otto von Guericke" e. V.) aus Mitteln des BMWK (Bundesministerium für Wirtschaft und Klimaschutz) gefördert.

Erklärung zu Interessenkonflikten: Die Autoren deklarieren keine Interessenkonflikte in Bezug auf diesen Artikel.

References

1 Liedtke, D.; Baudis, U.; Boßlet, J.; Huchel, U.; Lerche, W.; Spies, H.-J.; Klümper-Westkamp, H.: Wärmebehandlung von Eisenwerkstoffen II: Nitrieren und Nitrocarburieren. Kontakt & Studium 686, 7. Aufl., expert verlag, Renningen, 2018. – ISBN: 978-3-8169-3402-8Search in Google Scholar

2 Somers, M.; Mittemeijer, E.: Formation and growth of compound layer on nitrocarburizing iron: Kinetics and microstructural evolution. Surf. Eng. 3 (1987) 2, pp. 123–137, DOI:10.1179/sur.1987.3.2.12310.1179/sur.1987.3.2.123Search in Google Scholar

3 Somers, M.; Friehling, P.: Modellierung der Keimbildungs-und Wachstumskinetik der Verbindungsschicht beim Nitrieren von Reineisen. HTM J. Heat Treatm. Mat. 57 (2002) 6, pp. 415–420Search in Google Scholar

4 Meka, S. R.: Nitriding of iron-based binary and ternary alloys: microstructural development during nitride precipitation. Dissertation, Universität Stuttgart, 2011, DOI:10.18419/opus-134710.18419/opus-1347Search in Google Scholar

5 Mittemeijer, E.; Slycke, J.: Die thermodynamischen Aktivitäten von Stickstoff und Kohlenstoff versursacht von Nitrier-und Carburiergasatmosphären. HTM Härterei-Techn. Mitt. 50 (1995) 2, pp. 114–125Search in Google Scholar

6 Mittemeijer, E.; Somers, M.: Thermochemical surface engineering of steels. Woodhead Publishing Series in Metals and Surface Engineering – 62: Improving Materials Performance. Woodhead Publishing, Kidlington, UK, 2015. – ISBN: 978-085709-592-3Search in Google Scholar

7 Hoffmann, R.; Mittemeijer, E.; Somers, M. (Eds.): Verbindungsschichtbildung beim Nitrieren und Nitrocarburieren. HTM J. Heat Treatm. Mat. 51 (1996) 3, pp. 162–16910.1515/htm-1996-510307Search in Google Scholar

8 Somers, M.; Mittemeijer, E.: Porenbildung und Kohlenstoffaufnahme beim Nitrocarburieren. HTM Härterei-Tech. Mitt. 42 (1987), pp. 321–33110.1515/htm-1987-420604Search in Google Scholar

9 Höhn, B.-R.: Load carrying capacity of nitrided gears - mechanical properties, main influencing factors and critical evaluation of the application in gear transmissions. Nitriding and Nitrocarburizing – Proc. European Conf. Heat Treatment 2010, 29.-30.04.2010, Aachen, AWT e.V., Bremen, on CDSearch in Google Scholar

10 Sitzmann, A.; Hoja, S.; Schurer, S.; Tobie, T.; Stahl, K.: Deep nitriding – contact ­and bending strength of gears with increased nitriding hardening depth. Forsch. Ingenieurw. (2021), DOI: 10.1007/s10010-021-00502-w10.1007/s10010-021-00502-wSearch in Google Scholar

11 Mridha, S.; Jack, D.: Etching techniques for nitrided irons and steels. Metallogr. 15 (1982) 2, pp. 163–17510.1016/0026-0800(82)90020-9Search in Google Scholar

12 Chatterjee-Fischer, R.: Wärmebehandlung von Eisenwerkstoffen: Nitrieren und Nitrocarburieren. Kontakt & Studium, 3. Aufl., expert verlag, Sindelfingen, 1995. – ISBN: 10381690076Search in Google Scholar

13 Beckert, M.; Klemm, H.: Handbuch der metallographischen Ätzverfahren. 3. Aufl., VEB Deutscher Verlag für Grundstoffindustrie, Leipzig, 1966Search in Google Scholar

14 Young, R. A. (Ed.): The Rietveld Method. International Union of Crystallography, Vol. 5, Oxford University Press, NY, USA, 1993. – ISBN: 0198555776Search in Google Scholar

15 Hauk, V.: Structural and Residual Stress Analysis by Nondestructive Methods. 1. Aufl., Elsevier Science BV, Amsterdam, NL, 1997, p. 17. – ISBN: 978008054195210.1016/B978-044482476-9/50004-9Search in Google Scholar

16 Nikolussi, M.; Leineweber, A.; Mittemeijer, E.: Nitrogen diffusion through cementite layers. Philosophical Magazine 90 (2010) 9, pp. 1105–1122, DOI: 10.1080/ 147864309032923510.1080/1478643090329235Search in Google Scholar

17 Sommer, M.; Hoja, S.; Steinbacher, M.; Fechte-Heinen, R.: Investigation of Compound Layer Structures after Nitriding and Nitrocarburizing of Quenched and Tempered Steels. HTM J. Heat Treatm. Mat. 76 (2021) 3, pp. 219–236, DOI: 10.1515/htm-2021-000510.1515/htm-2021-0005Search in Google Scholar

Published Online: 2022-06-21
Published in Print: 2022-06-30

© 2022 M. Sommer, J. Epp, M. Steinbacher, R. Fechte-Heinen, S. Hoja, publiziert von De Gruyter

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.