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Technology for Behavior Change – Potential, Challenges, and Ethical Questions

An Interdisciplinary Experts Discussion

  • Sarah Diefenbach

    Sarah Diefenbach is professor for market and consumer psychology at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich. Her research focuses on the design and evaluation of interactive technology with a special attention to emotional experience and psychological needs.

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    , Andreas Kapsner

    Andreas Kapsner’s work in philosophy spans the field from theoretical to practical philosophy. He holds a PhD in cognitive science and works at the psychology department of the LMU Munich. Also, he is co-founder of nifu.tv, a collective of interactive media artists and scientists dedicated to the joint exploration of complex ideas (www.nifu.tv).

    , Matthias Laschke

    Matthias Laschke is a postdoctoral researcher in Prof. Dr. Marc Hassenzahl’s workgroup at Folkwang University of the Arts, Germany. He focuses on the design and aesthetics of transformational objects (“pleasurable troublemakers”) and persuasive technologies addressing diverse topics such as sustainability, procrastination, willpower, adherence, and driver concentration in traffic.

    , Jasmin Niess

    Jasmin Niess is a researcher in Prof. Dr. Sarah Diefenbach’s workgroup at Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Germany. Her research focuses on interactive technologies for self-improvement, in particular on the implementation of psychological knowledge within these products, in order to improve the User’s Experience.

    and Daniel Ullrich

    Daniel UIllrich is researcher in the institute of informatics at Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich. His research focuses on the interaction with and influence of robots in the field of human-robot-interaction, in particular robot personality and application of social psychological mechanisms.

From the journal i-com

About the authors

Sarah Diefenbach

Sarah Diefenbach is professor for market and consumer psychology at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich. Her research focuses on the design and evaluation of interactive technology with a special attention to emotional experience and psychological needs.

Andreas Kapsner

Andreas Kapsner’s work in philosophy spans the field from theoretical to practical philosophy. He holds a PhD in cognitive science and works at the psychology department of the LMU Munich. Also, he is co-founder of nifu.tv, a collective of interactive media artists and scientists dedicated to the joint exploration of complex ideas (www.nifu.tv).

Matthias Laschke

Matthias Laschke is a postdoctoral researcher in Prof. Dr. Marc Hassenzahl’s workgroup at Folkwang University of the Arts, Germany. He focuses on the design and aesthetics of transformational objects (“pleasurable troublemakers”) and persuasive technologies addressing diverse topics such as sustainability, procrastination, willpower, adherence, and driver concentration in traffic.

Jasmin Niess

Jasmin Niess is a researcher in Prof. Dr. Sarah Diefenbach’s workgroup at Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Germany. Her research focuses on interactive technologies for self-improvement, in particular on the implementation of psychological knowledge within these products, in order to improve the User’s Experience.

Daniel Ullrich

Daniel UIllrich is researcher in the institute of informatics at Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich. His research focuses on the interaction with and influence of robots in the field of human-robot-interaction, in particular robot personality and application of social psychological mechanisms.

Related Literature

[1] Gigerenzer, G., Hertwig, R., & Pachur, T. (2011). Heuristics: The foundations of adaptive behavior. Oxford University Press, Inc.Search in Google Scholar

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[3] Laschke, M., Diefenbach, S., & Hassenzahl, M. (2015). “Annoying, but in a nice way”: An inquiry into the experience of frictional feedback. International Journal of Design, 9(2), 129–140.Search in Google Scholar

[4] Laschke, M., Diefenbach, S., Schneider, T. & Hassenzahl, M. (2014). Keymoment: Initiating Behavior Change through Friendly Friction. In Proceedings of the NordiCHI 2014 Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction (pp. 853–858). New York: ACM Press.Search in Google Scholar

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Published Online: 2016-08-16
Published in Print: 2016-08-01

© 2016 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston

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