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Changing Things so (Almost) Everything Stays the Same

Technical Challenges and Solutions in a Mixed-Reality System for Financial Services

Mateusz Dolata

Dr. Mateusz Dolata, born 1988, is a full-time postdoctoral researcher at the University of Zurich, Department of Informatics. His research interests span co-located collaboration in IT-supported settings and application of artificial intelligence for the common good. He applies a multidisciplinary perspective shaped by his background in computational linguistics, philosophy, and applied computer science. He has co-authored numerous conference and journal articles which open the black box of human work practices in human-computer assemblages. His research has appeared in journals and proceeding series including Computer Supported Cooperative Work, Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction, Information Technology & People, or Business & Information Systems Engineering.

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, Simon Schubiger

Dr. Simon Schubiger works as a senior principal software engineer on 3D technology at Esri. Before, he was professor for computer graphics, teaching game design and audio/video processing at the University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland and was the head of software development at Esri R&D center in Zurich, Switzerland. He is co-founder of the ETH spin-off company Procedural Inc, acquired 2011 by Esri. Previously, he was lecturing mobile system architectures at ETH Zurich, worked for Swisscom Innovations, and as an associate researcher in the Pervasive and Artificial Intelligence group at the University of Fribourg. His research interests include 3D computer graphics, multimedia performance systems, mobile computing, knowledge representation, programming languages, and user interface design.

, Doris Agotai

Dr. Doris Agotai has headed the newly founded Institute for Interactive Technologies FHNW since 2018, which is a multidisciplinary informatics institute specializing in the development of digital interfaces for people and processes. Until the end of 2017, she was deputy head of the Institute for 4D Technologies and, as the person in charge of the Design & Technology research area, built up and established the focus on design in computer science. In this role, she realized numerous projects in applied research and development and, in addition to regular teaching engagements, accompanied student projects, including the interdisciplinary and international iPOLE project. Her research interests embrace design and deployment of bleeding-edge technologies in collaborative settings.

and Gerhard Schwabe

Dr. Gerhard Schwabe has been a full professor at the University of Zurich since 2002. He has studied collaboration at the granularity of dyads, small teams, large teams, organizations, communities and social networks. In doing so, he follows either an engineering approach (“design science”) or an exploratory approach – frequently in collaboration with companies and public organizations. He has published in computer science conferences as well as in major information systems conferences and journals. Currently, his research interests focus on blockchain applications and human-robot collaboration.

From the journal i-com

Abstract

The deployment of mixed reality systems in professional settings demands adaptation of the physical environment and practices. However, technology-driven changes to the environment are problematic in some contexts. Specifically, face-to-face advisory services rely on scripted material routines using specific tools. This manuscript explores challenges encountered during the development of LivePaper, a mixed-reality system for supporting financial advisory services. First, the article presents a range of design requirements derived from existing literature and multiple years of research experience concerning advisory services and physical collaborative environments. Second, it discusses technical and design challenges that emerged when building LivePaper along with those requirements. Third, the article describes a range of technical solutions and new design ideas implemented in a working system to mitigate the encountered problems. It explores potential alternative solutions and delivers empirical or conceptual arguments for the choices made. The manuscript concludes with implications for the advisory services, the systems used to support such encounters, and specific technical guidance for the developers of mixed reality solutions in institutional settings. Overall, the article advances the discourse on the application of technology in advisory services, the use of mixed-reality systems in professional environments, and the physical nature of collaboration.

Award Identifier / Grant number: 17716.1 PFES-ES

Funding statement: The research described in the current article was supported by Innosuisse – Swiss Innovation Agency (project 17716.1 PFES-ES).

About the authors

Mateusz Dolata

Dr. Mateusz Dolata, born 1988, is a full-time postdoctoral researcher at the University of Zurich, Department of Informatics. His research interests span co-located collaboration in IT-supported settings and application of artificial intelligence for the common good. He applies a multidisciplinary perspective shaped by his background in computational linguistics, philosophy, and applied computer science. He has co-authored numerous conference and journal articles which open the black box of human work practices in human-computer assemblages. His research has appeared in journals and proceeding series including Computer Supported Cooperative Work, Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction, Information Technology & People, or Business & Information Systems Engineering.

Simon Schubiger

Dr. Simon Schubiger works as a senior principal software engineer on 3D technology at Esri. Before, he was professor for computer graphics, teaching game design and audio/video processing at the University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland and was the head of software development at Esri R&D center in Zurich, Switzerland. He is co-founder of the ETH spin-off company Procedural Inc, acquired 2011 by Esri. Previously, he was lecturing mobile system architectures at ETH Zurich, worked for Swisscom Innovations, and as an associate researcher in the Pervasive and Artificial Intelligence group at the University of Fribourg. His research interests include 3D computer graphics, multimedia performance systems, mobile computing, knowledge representation, programming languages, and user interface design.

Doris Agotai

Dr. Doris Agotai has headed the newly founded Institute for Interactive Technologies FHNW since 2018, which is a multidisciplinary informatics institute specializing in the development of digital interfaces for people and processes. Until the end of 2017, she was deputy head of the Institute for 4D Technologies and, as the person in charge of the Design & Technology research area, built up and established the focus on design in computer science. In this role, she realized numerous projects in applied research and development and, in addition to regular teaching engagements, accompanied student projects, including the interdisciplinary and international iPOLE project. Her research interests embrace design and deployment of bleeding-edge technologies in collaborative settings.

Gerhard Schwabe

Dr. Gerhard Schwabe has been a full professor at the University of Zurich since 2002. He has studied collaboration at the granularity of dyads, small teams, large teams, organizations, communities and social networks. In doing so, he follows either an engineering approach (“design science”) or an exploratory approach – frequently in collaboration with companies and public organizations. He has published in computer science conferences as well as in major information systems conferences and journals. Currently, his research interests focus on blockchain applications and human-robot collaboration.

Acknowledgment

We wanted to express our gratitude to all collaborators who participated in this project. Our special thanks go to Ulrike Schock, Fiona Nüesch, and Dr. Mehmet Kilic who made significant contributions to the design of LivePaper. We also want to express our gratitude to the Hypothekarbank Lenzburg for sharing their expertise and supporting the evaluation of the system. We thank the editorial board of i-com for providing a platform to publish this work.

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Published Online: 2021-11-27
Published in Print: 2021-12-20

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