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Licensed Unlicensed Requires Authentication Published by De Gruyter Oldenbourg November 30, 2014

Making security type systems less ad hoc

Tobias Nipkow

Tobias Nipkow received his Diplom in Informatik (MSc in Computer Science) from the Technische Hochschule Darmstadt in 1982 and a PhD in Computer Science from The University of Manchester in 1987. He held post-doc positions at MIT and Cambridge University before becoming a professor at the Technische Universität München in 1992. He has worked on term rewriting, programming language semantics and theorem proving. For more than 20 years, Tobias Nipkow and his research group in Munich (jointly with Lawrence Paulson in Cambridge and Makarius Wenzel in Paris) have been developing the popular proof assistant Isabelle.

Fakultät für Informatik, Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstr. 3, 85748 Garching, Germany, Tel.: +49-89-289-17302, Fax: +49-89-289-17301

and Andrei Popescu

Andrei Popescu received his BA in Computer Science from the University of Bucharest in 2001, a PhD in Mathematics from the same university in 2005, and a PhD in Computer Science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2010. From 2010, he is working as a post-doc at the Technische Universität München. His main research interests are mechanical verification, type systems, category theory, information-flow security, and intersections of these areas.

Fakultät für Informatik, Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstr. 3, 85748 Garching, Germany, Tel.: +49-173-2609466, Fax: +49-89-289-17301

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Abstract

We present a uniform, top-down design method for security type systems applied to a parallel while-language. The method takes the following route: from a notion of end-to-end security via a collection of stronger notions of anytime security targeting compositionality to a matching collection of type-system-like syntactic criteria. This method has emerged by distilling and unifying security type system results from the literature while formalizing them in a proof assistant. Unlike in our previous papers on this topic, here we focus entirely on high-level ideas instead of technical proof details.

About the authors

Tobias Nipkow

Tobias Nipkow received his Diplom in Informatik (MSc in Computer Science) from the Technische Hochschule Darmstadt in 1982 and a PhD in Computer Science from The University of Manchester in 1987. He held post-doc positions at MIT and Cambridge University before becoming a professor at the Technische Universität München in 1992. He has worked on term rewriting, programming language semantics and theorem proving. For more than 20 years, Tobias Nipkow and his research group in Munich (jointly with Lawrence Paulson in Cambridge and Makarius Wenzel in Paris) have been developing the popular proof assistant Isabelle.

Fakultät für Informatik, Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstr. 3, 85748 Garching, Germany, Tel.: +49-89-289-17302, Fax: +49-89-289-17301

Andrei Popescu

Andrei Popescu received his BA in Computer Science from the University of Bucharest in 2001, a PhD in Mathematics from the same university in 2005, and a PhD in Computer Science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2010. From 2010, he is working as a post-doc at the Technische Universität München. His main research interests are mechanical verification, type systems, category theory, information-flow security, and intersections of these areas.

Fakultät für Informatik, Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstr. 3, 85748 Garching, Germany, Tel.: +49-173-2609466, Fax: +49-89-289-17301

Received: 2014-6-4
Revised: 2014-10-10
Accepted: 2014-10-17
Published Online: 2014-11-30
Published in Print: 2014-12-28

©2014 Walter de Gruyter Berlin/Boston

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