Accessible Requires Authentication Published by De Gruyter Oldenbourg November 26, 2019

Strategies to digitalize inert health practices: The gamification of glucose monitoring

Caterina Joelle Neumann, Tereza Kolak and Carolin Auschra ORCID logo

Abstract

The ongoing digital transformation will potentially change traditional health care practices fundamentally. However, change agents usually face serious challenges arising from the highly institutionalized nature of this industry. Using the gamification of glucose monitoring as part of diabetes care as an example, this paper focuses on strategies to transform health care, allowing not only to cope with, but also to change this context: gamification encourages behavioral changes in patients, establishes new roles between patients and providers, and thereby elevates patient empowerment.

ACM CCS:

Acknowledgment

The authors thank two anonymous reviewers and Joerg Sydow for insightful comments on previous versions of this paper.

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Received: 2019-06-28
Revised: 2019-09-30
Accepted: 2019-11-08
Published Online: 2019-11-26
Published in Print: 2019-10-25

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