Accessible Requires Authentication Published by De Gruyter January 31, 2014

Sailing Video-Imagery: Impacts on Imagery Ability

Jennifer Gapin and Tim Herzog

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of a standardized mental practice tool incorporating principles of video, modeling, and traditional-imagery,on the imagery ability of competitive college sailors. A quasi-experimental method using a quantitative pre-test/post-test design was administered with a convenience sample of collegiate sailors recruited via the Internet. An integrated video-imagery intervention was compared with a traditional verbal intervention to measure each intervention’s impact on imagery ability. The Vividness of Movement Imagery Questionnaire-2 (VMIQ-2) was used to assess external visual imagery, internal visual imagery, and kinesthetic imagery. Exposure to video-imagery resulted in significant improvement of external visual, internal visual, and kinesthetic imagery abilities. There was no significant difference between improvements from video-imagery versus traditional-imagery. Future studies should explore best combinations of imagery and observation techniques, and efficacious elements of each

Appendix: sample skipper script forvideo-imagery and traditional-imagery conditions

Tacks

Perhaps you count through your tacks … prepare to picture your boat heading up on 1 and 2, and rolling big on 3. As you bring your shoulders in and trim a hair, feel the tiller go from being neutral to big weather helm. With this tug away from you, you simply let it glide across. 1…2…You see the jib momentarily touch the mast … 3 you lean out, and see your crew against the rail. You feel the main sheet slide through your hand as you ease it and step across the boat. Your feet instinctively find the strap and your shoulders go out and down hard. You feel the strain of your abdomen and lower back as your shoulders come down, upper body parallel to the water. Instinctively again, your hands make the switch. You feel the burn in your bicep and your forearm, and hear the fast clicks of your ratchet, as you aggressively crank in a big mainsheet pump. You see the jib coming in slowly as the tiller glides a tiny bit over and you carve it up. You notice the tension in your back and shoulders as you carefully but instinctively adjust your weight on your new course. You see your tell tales are flowing back smoothly and then the windward one begins to drop occasionally once again. You notice that your heart is beating fast, and you are loving every minute of it. Now practice several more.

Tacks (shortened script)

Perhaps counting through tacks … heading up on 1 and 2, and rolling big on 3. Shoulders in and trim a hair, the tiller goes from being neutral to weather helm. With this tug away, you simply let it glide across. 1…2…The jib momentarily touches the mast … 3 you lean out, and see your crew against the rail. You feel the main sheet slide through your hand as you ease it and step across the boat. Your feet instinctively find the strap and your shoulders go out and down hard. You feel the strain of your abdomen and lower back as your shoulders come down, upper body parallel to the water. Instinctively again, your hands make the switch. You feel the burn in your bicep and your forearm, and hear the fast clicks of your ratchet, as you aggressively crank in a big mainsheet pump. You see the jib coming in slowly as the tiller glides a tiny bit over and you carve it up. You notice the tension in your back and shoulders as you carefully but instinctively adjust your weight on your new course. You see your tell tales are flowing back smoothly and then the windward one begins to drop occasionally once again. You notice that your heart is beating fast, and you are loving every minute of it. Now practice several more…

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Published Online: 2014-1-31
Published in Print: 2014-1-1

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