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Licensed Unlicensed Requires Authentication Published by De Gruyter May 9, 2016

Association between physical activity and bone in children with Prader-Willi syndrome

Andrea T. Duran, Kathleen S. Wilson, Diobel M. Castner, Jared M. Tucker and Daniela A. Rubin

Abstract

Background: The aim of the study was to determine if physical activity (PA) is associated with bone health in children with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS).

Methods: Participants included 23 children with PWS (age: 11.0±2.0 years). PA, measured by accelerometry, was categorized into light, moderate, vigorous and moderate plus vigorous intensities. Hip, total body minus the head (body), bone mineral content (BMC), bone mineral density (BMD) and BMD z-score (BMDz) were measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry. Separate hierarchical regression models were completed for all bone parameters, PA intensity and select covariates.

Results: Moderate PA and select covariates explained the most variance in hip BMC (84.0%), BMD (61.3%) and BMDz (34.9%; p<0.05 for all). Likewise, for each body parameter, moderate PA and select covariates explained the most variance in body BMC (75.8%), BMD (74.4%) and BMDz (31.8%; p<0.05 for all).

Conclusions: PA of at least moderate intensity appears important for BMC and BMD in children with PWS.


Corresponding author: Daniela A. Rubin, PhD, Department of Kinesiology, California State University Fullerton, 800 N. State College Blvd. KHS 138, Fullerton, CA 92834-3599, USA

Acknowledgments:

The authors would like to thank the families that participated.

  1. Research funding: This study was funded by the United States Army Medical Research and Materiel Command Award W81XWH-09-1-0682.

  2. Employment or leadership: None declared.

  3. Honorarium: None declared.

  4. Competing interests: The funding organization(s) played no role in the study design; in the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data; in the writing of the report; or in the decision to submit the report for publication.

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Received: 2015-6-19
Accepted: 2016-3-29
Published Online: 2016-5-9
Published in Print: 2016-7-1

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