Accessible Requires Authentication Published by De Gruyter Mouton March 11, 2017

There and back again – but how? Motion event encoding in the Chinese translation of The Hobbit

Richard Lester
From the journal Linguistics

Abstract

This paper extends Slobin’s (2005, Relating narrative events in translation. In Dorit D. Ravid & Hava B. Shyldkrot (eds.), Perspectives on language and language development: Essays in honor of Ruth A. Berman, 115–129. Dordrecht: Kluwer) examination of 10 satellite- and verb-framed translations of a single English text to Chinese, a language considered variously as a satellite-framed language and an equipollently framed language. The Chinese translation is examined in terms of the patterns of manner and path encoding employed in attempting to reproduce the vividness of manner description and degree of detailed path elaboration of the original source text, and in how these compare to the other languages examined in Slobin. Lexical, morphosyntactic, typological and cultural factors contributing to the overall narrative style of Chinese are examined, and an evaluation offered of the place of Chinese on proposed clines of manner and path salience.

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Published Online: 2017-3-11
Published in Print: 2017-5-24

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