Accessible Unlicensed Requires Authentication Published by De Gruyter May 12, 2016

One African Male in Higher Education

Robert L. Nichols

Abstract

Many predominantly White universities and colleges are seeking ways to both recruit and retain Black students (Simmons, J., Lowery-Hart, R., Wahl, S. T., & McBride, M. C. (2013). Understanding the African-American student experience in higher education through a relational dialectics perspective. Communication Education, 62(4), 376–394. doi: 10.1080/03634523.2013.813631). With lower academic results from the K-12 system, it is specifically harder for these universities and colleges to recruit and retain Black male students. There has been much study given to why Black men are not as successful as other racial and gender groups in K-12, but little research has been given to Black men who successfully finish the K-12 system and matriculate to higher education (Griffin, K. A., Jayakumar, U. M., Jones, M. M., & Allen, W. R. (2010). Ebony in the ivory tower: Examining trends in the socioeconomic status, achievement, and self-concept of black, male freshmen. Equity & Excellence in Education, 43(2), 232–248. doi: 10.1080/10665681003704915). This study presents the cultural background of a male from Africa and how his culture has helped him to be successful in higher education.

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Published Online: 2016-5-12
Published in Print: 2016-9-1

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