Skip to content
Licensed Unlicensed Requires Authentication Published by De Gruyter May 23, 2021

Effect of TIG welding parameters in joining grade 2 pure titanium

Murat Sönmez and Polat Topuz
From the journal Materials Testing

Abstract

Grade 2, the most widely used pure titanium in the industry, has high corrosion resistance, excellent ductility, good weldability and is easily machinable. If titanium is exposed to temperatures above 500 °C due to moisture or hydrocarbons in the air, it is susceptible to taking up oxygen, nitrogen, carbon and hydrogen. This can cause cracks, especially after welding. Therefore, protection of the welding zone from external factors is of great importance during welding. For these reasons, TIG welding is the most widely used method for titanium welding. In this study, Grade 2 pure titanium plates are joined by TIG welding at three (40 A, 60 A and 80 A) current values under the same conditions. For the welding process, 2 wt.-% cerium addition Tungsten tip and high purity (99.99 vol.-%) argon was used as a shielding gas. After a visual inspection of the welded samples, microstructure inspections, macrostructure inspections, hardness measurements, bending tests and tensile tests were performed in accordance with the standards. As a result of the investigations, it was determined that the most suitable current value for the joining of Grade 2 titanium by TIG welding was 60 A.


Assistant Prof. Dr. Polat Topuz İstanbul Gedik University Sülüntepe Mh. Yunus Emre Cd. No 1/1 34913 Pendik, İstanbul,Turkey

Acknowledgement

This research was supported by İstanbul Gedik University, Scientific Research Projects Coordination Department (Project No. GDK201804-05).

References

1 M. Sönmez: Investigation of the Effect of Titanium Welding on Mechanical Properties, MSc Thesis, Institute of Science, Defense Technology Department İstanbul Gedik University, Istanbul, Turkey (2019)Search in Google Scholar

2 http://www.aerospacemetals.com/contact-aerospace-metals.html accessed September 17, 2019Search in Google Scholar

3 http://www.supraalloys.com/titanium-grades.php,accessed September 17, 2019Search in Google Scholar

4 Matthew J. Donachie: Titanium, A Technical Guide, 2nd Edition, ASM International, Materials Park, Ohio, USA (2000)10.31399/asm.tb.ttg2.9781627082693Search in Google Scholar

5 R. Bendikine, S. Baskut, J. Baskutiene, A. Ciuplys, T. Kacinskas: Comparative study of TIG welding commercially pure titanium, Journal of Manufacturing Processes 36 (2018), pp. 155-163 DOI:10.1016/j.jmapro.2018.10.00710.1016/j.jmapro.2018.10.007Search in Google Scholar

6 https://www.millerwelds.com/resources/article-library/titanium-101-best-tig-gta-welding-practices- accessed October 31, 2019Search in Google Scholar

7 A. L. Engel, I. R. Lane, R. W. Huber: Arc-Welding Titanium, U. S. Dept. of the Interior, Bureau of Mines, Washington, D. C., USA (1955)Search in Google Scholar

8 R. E. Monroe, J. E. Mortland: Joining of Titanium, DMIC report 240, Defense Metals Information Center, Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, Ohio, USA (1967)Search in Google Scholar

9 C. E. Cross, D. Eliezer, Th. Böllinghaus: The role of hydrogen in titanium alloy weldments, Proc. of the 22nd International Titanium Conference, Titanium Association, San Diego, USA (2006), pp. 1-10Search in Google Scholar

10 S. J. McDonald: Tig Welding Secrets: An In-Depth Look at Making Aesthetically Pleasing TIG Welds, Kindle Ed., Independently Publishing, Michigan, USA (2017)Search in Google Scholar

11 R. K. Rajput: A Textbook of Manufacturing Technology: Manufacturing Processes, Firewall Media, Laxmi Publications, India (2007)Search in Google Scholar

12 A. Uzun: The effect of welding Speed on the weld seam profile in MAG and TIG/MAG hybrid arc welding, Practical Metallography 54 (2014), No. 4, pp. 225-240 DOI:10.3139/147.11042310.3139/147.110423Search in Google Scholar

13 S. R. Farnsworth: Welding for Dummies, 1st Ed., John Wiley & Sons Publishing, Hoboken, New Jersey, USA (2010)Search in Google Scholar

14 EN ISO 17639: Destructive Tests on Welds in Metallic Materials: Macroscopic and Microscopic Examination of Welds, Comite Europeen de Normalisation Publishing, Bruxelles, Belgium (2013)Search in Google Scholar

15 EN ISO 9015-2: Destructive Tests on Welds in Metallic Materials: Hardness Testing – Part 2: Microhardness Testing of Welded Joints, Comite Europeen de Normalisation Publishing, Bruxelles, Belgium (2016)Search in Google Scholar

16 EN ISO 5173: Destructive Tests on Welds in Metallic Materials: Bend Tests, Comite Europeen de Normalisation Publishing, Bruxelles, Belgium (2010)Search in Google Scholar

17 EN ISO 4136: Destructive Tests on Welds in Metallic Materials: Transverse Tensile Test, Comite Europeen de Normalisation Publishing, Bruxelles, Belgium (2012)Search in Google Scholar

Published Online: 2021-05-23
Published in Print: 2021-05-26

© 2021 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston, Germany