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Licensed Unlicensed Requires Authentication Published by De Gruyter July 7, 2022

Living with Absence, Missing Migrants and the Red Cross and Red Crescent’s Restoring Family Links Program

  • Sefa Secen

    Sefa Secen, Incoming Postdoc at the Mershon Center for International Security Studies at the Ohio State University.

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    and Mostafa Shalaby

Abstract

The chaos and confusion that accompany war, disaster, and international migration separate families when they need each other most. The Red Cross and Red Crescent join the search across international borders, offering a unique service that allows families to reconnect. This paper examines the role of the Red Cross and Red Crescent, and specifically their Restoring Family Links (RFL) program in the search for missing migrants. Based on interviews with the RFL program’s officers and those individuals who have been reconnected with their missing family members, this paper evaluates the results and implications of the RFL program model, draws out lessons and insights (local, regional, or global), and makes policy recommendations. Also, by sharing migrants’ experiences and insights, it aims to raise awareness of the less well-known legal, economic, and social consequences of the displacement crises.


Corresponding author: Sefa Secen, Political Science Department, Syracuse University, 100 Eggers Hall, 13244-1020, Syracuse, NY, USA, E-mail:

About the author

Sefa Secen

Sefa Secen, Incoming Postdoc at the Mershon Center for International Security Studies at the Ohio State University.

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List of Interviews

Interview #1 Regional Program Director of the American Red Cross (11 January 2021).Search in Google Scholar

Interview #2 Regional Program Director of the American Red Cross (20 January 2021).Search in Google Scholar

Interview #3 Restoring Family Links Program Coordinator of the American Red Cross (February 9, 2021).Search in Google Scholar

Interview #4 Restoring Family Links Program Coordinator of ICRC in Mexico (February 18, 2021).Search in Google Scholar

Interview #5 Sahasa Family, Syracuse, NY, (March 2, 2021).Search in Google Scholar

Published Online: 2022-07-07
Published in Print: 2022-09-27

© 2022 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston

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