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Average fibre length as a measure of the amount of long fibres in mechanical pulps – ranking of pulps may shift

Olof Ferritsius EMAIL logo , Rita Ferritsius and Mats Rundlöf

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the applicability of different ways of calculating the average fibre length based on length measurements of individual particles of mechanical pulps. We have found that the commonly used average length-weighted fibre length, which is based on the assumption that coarseness is constant for all particles, as well as the arithmetic average, may lead to erroneous conclusions in real life as well as in simulations when used as a measure of the amount of long fibres. The average length-length-weighted fibre length or a weighting close to that, which to a larger extent suppresses the influence of shorter particles, is a relevant parameter of the “length” factor, i. e. amount of long fibres. Our findings are based on three studies: refining of different assortments of wood raw material in a mill; data from LC refining in mill of TMP, including Bauer McNett fractionation; mixing of pulps with different fibre length distributions. If the acceptable average fibre length for different products can be lowered, the possibility of reducing the specific energy input in refining will increase. Therefore, we need a reliable and appropriate way to assess the “length” factor.

Funding statement: We gratefully acknowledge the Swedish Energy Agency, the Knowledge Foundation, and Stora Enso for financial support.

Acknowledgments

We gratefully acknowledge partners in the e2mp-program for valuable discussions; employees at Stora Enso Skoghall and Stora Enso Kvarnsveden for stimulating trials and discussions; Maria Vornanen and Alf Gustafsson at Stora Enso for skilful experimental work.

  1. Conflict of interest: There is no conflict of interest.

Appendix

Kraft cook conditions

The chip samples (333 g BD) were cooked in a 30-litre digester with recirculation of the Kraft liquor at an effective alkali of 22 % as NaOH. Liquor to wood ratio was 3.8 l/kg. Temperature profile was 122–132 C (40 min), 132–155 C (5 min), 155–157 C (70 min) and 157–159 C (110 min). The yield was 49 %. The CTMP samples (100 g BD) were cooked in autoclaves with an effective alkali of 25 % as NaOH. The temperature was raised to 160 C for 90 min and remained at this level for 155 min. The yield was 47 %.

Appendix

Average fibre length of digested CTMP

The CTMPs were also digested to allow a more strict comparison. Average fibre length (arithmetic, length-weighted, length-length-weighted) of digested CTMP is plotted versus the corresponding value for the original CTMP in Figures 1214. This gave a similar picture of the higher amount of the longest fibres in the pulp made of the sawmill chips.

Figure 12 Average arithmetic fibre length of the digested CTMP vs the original CTMP.
Figure 12

Average arithmetic fibre length of the digested CTMP vs the original CTMP.

Figure 13 Average length-weighted fibre length of the digested CTMP vs the original CTMP.
Figure 13

Average length-weighted fibre length of the digested CTMP vs the original CTMP.

Figure 14 Average length-length-weighted fibre length of the digested CTMP vs the original CTMP.
Figure 14

Average length-length-weighted fibre length of the digested CTMP vs the original CTMP.

Figure 15 Illustration of six model pulps with different fibre length distributions and their corresponding average fibre lengths, calculated with four levels of power of weight (p) in Equation 4.
Figure 15

Illustration of six model pulps with different fibre length distributions and their corresponding average fibre lengths, calculated with four levels of power of weight (p) in Equation 4.

Appendix

Modelling the influence of fibre length distribution

For deeper insights into why the ranking of pulps with respect to average fibre length can change, we have modelled the influence of the amount of fines.

Consider two model pulps, A and B, with different fibre length distribution, each consisting of two fibres, see Figure 15. Pulp A consists of two 3 mm long fibres while the two fibres in Pulp B are 2 and 4 mm long. Pulp B is also “refined” to peel off fines from the fibre wall in different amounts without shortening the fibres, resulting in Pulp B1, B2, B3, and B4. The fines are 0.2 mm long. Pulp B1 contains two fines particles, while Pulp B2 contains 20, Pulp B3 200, and B4 600. The value of 600 fines particles was derived by assuming that the pulp consists of 30 % fines where each particle has a width of 4 µm and a thickness of 1 µm. These values are within the range given by Marton (1964), but above 0.5 µm in width as reported by Gavelin et al. (1975). Smaller fines dimensions than we used here would have rendered more than 600 fines particles. Average fibre lengths of these model pulps are also included, calculated in four ways corresponding to a value of power of weight (p) ranging from 0 to 3.

Figure 16 Average fibre length of six model pulps as a function of power of weight (p) in Equation 4.
Figure 16

Average fibre length of six model pulps as a function of power of weight (p) in Equation 4.

Pulps B–B4 obviously contain the longest fibre compared to Pulp A regardless of the amount of fines. This is reflected in the higher averages when p = 3. However, using the length-weighted average (p = 1) the ranking of the pulps is strongly influenced by the amount of fines: Pulp B2, B3, and B4 exhibit a lower average compared to Pulp A. Also for the length-length-weighted average (p = 2), the higher fines content of B3 and B4 rank these pulps lower than A. The arithmetic average (p = 0) does not distinguish between Pulp A and B. This average is even more influenced by the amount of fines, Pulp B1–B4 may be interpreted as having the shortest fibres. In conclusion, the length-length-weighted average (p = 2) seems to be a more relevant way to assess the amounts of long fibres compared to length-weighted average (p = 1). More studies are needed to justify a higher value of p than 2, although the study with model pulps and the graph in Figure 16 indicates that p may be above 2. Studies by Carvalho et al indicates that coarseness increases faster than linear with fibre length (1997) meaning that p is slightly higher than 2.

The point at which the ranking of the model pulps shift has been studied more closely, i. e. the point where the average fibre length of B-pulps becomes higher than that of Pulp A. To do this, the average fibre length has been calculated as a function of power of weight ranging continuously from 0 to 3, Figure 16.

The figure illustrates that at higher fines contents it is necessary to increase the power of weight (p) in order to maintain the ranking of the pulps with respect to average fibre length. This explains why the ranking of the CTMPs became the opposite of what was found based on the right hand side of the whole fibre length distributions (c.f. Figure 4). If the length distribution had been narrower, the ranking of the pulps would have been less affected by how the weighting of the length-data was made. The higher amount of long fibres in the CTMP made of saw-mill chips was accompanied by a higher amount of fines, i. e. the length distribution was wider. This had a strong impact on the arithmetic and the length-weighted average fibre length. Other changes in raw material and process conditions may sometimes lead to similar changes in the relation between long fibres and fines. Therefore, it is important not to let an increased fines content be reflected in a too low reading of the average fibre length if we wish to reflect the amount of long fibres.

Figure 17 Model of fibre. Section 1 and section 3 were allowed to be bent in point A and B, respectively to get fibres with different level of curl. Section 1 and section 3 were allowed to rotate in and out of the paper plane.
Figure 17

Model of fibre. Section 1 and section 3 were allowed to be bent in point A and B, respectively to get fibres with different level of curl. Section 1 and section 3 were allowed to rotate in and out of the paper plane.

Appendix

Modelling the influence of curl on the measurement of fiber length (Lc)

A fibre model was constructed according to Figure 17. Each of the three sections of the fibre was 1 mm long which means that the fibre in total was 3 mm long (Lr). The fibres were allowed to be bent in the two points A and B to different extent (cf. ϕA and ϕB in Figure 17) in order to get fibres with different level of curl. Furthermore, the section 1 and section 3 were also allowed to rotate randomly 0–360 degree (cf. θA and θB in Figure 17). For each of six levels of ϕ (ϕA = ϕB) about 2000 fibres were run and the projected fibre length in 2D (Lc) was recorded. Curl was calculated according to curl = (Lc-Lp)/Lp where Lp is the straight distance between the end points of the fibre in 2D. A higher level of curl resulted as expected in a lower value of Lc, Figure 18. A straight fibre has a curl of zero and will get a projected length of 3 mm. A “normal” level of curl for mechanical pulps are in the range of 10 to 20 %. At this level the value of the projected length Lc was about 10 to 15 % lower than the real length in 3D with this simple model.

Figure 18 A higher level of curl resulted in a lower projected fibre length in 2D (Lc{L_{c}}). The real length in 3D (LrLr) was 3 mm for every fibre. Each level of curl was based on at least 2000 simulations.
Figure 18

A higher level of curl resulted in a lower projected fibre length in 2D (Lc). The real length in 3D (Lr) was 3 mm for every fibre. Each level of curl was based on at least 2000 simulations.

A conclusion from this study is that fibres with a lower level of projected fibre length in 2D (Lc) and a higher level of curl may have a higher real fibre length in 3D (Lr). Hence the ranking with respect to fibre length may be shifted.

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Received: 2017-12-12
Accepted: 2018-07-01
Published Online: 2018-08-15
Published in Print: 2018-09-25

© 2018 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston

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