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BY 4.0 license Open Access Published by De Gruyter Open Access July 26, 2019

Being Gifted as Negative Certainty

David Mark Dunning EMAIL logo
From the journal Open Theology

Abstract

Existentialism centres reflection upon the bodily existence of the human person. Generally, however, theological anthropology has struggled to manage developments in biological and psychological sciences that have made clear the pluriformity of human embodiment. The work of the social sciences has also increased the visibility of minority, disadvantaged, or neglected persons. Theological anthropology must begin to conceive of an inclusive, non-static understanding of human nature that fully acknowledges the integrity and the diverse identities of the human subject. To riposte, this article utilises the interplay between phenomenology and theology in the work of the contemporary philosopher-theologian Jean-Luc Marion. Marion undeniably sees the root of the human in the concrete free person; he recognises an ever-receding, indefinable horizon towards which the incomprehensible existence of the subjective phenomenon is universally oriented. In this article I focus on how a combination of the theology of the subject and its existential orientation, realised through the freedom of incomprehensibility à la Marion, may provide a dynamic basis for understanding human nature at a time when subjective diversity is ever more asserted.

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Received: 2019-05-09
Accepted: 2019-06-28
Published Online: 2019-07-26

© 2019 David Mark Dunning, published by De Gruyter

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Public License.

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