Accessible Requires Authentication Published by De Gruyter July 13, 2020

Peacekeeping after Covid-19

Han Dorussen

Abstract

The 2020 Covid-19 pandemic may not be a game changer for future peacekeeping and humanitarian operations, but it is likely to strengthen developments that have been on-going since the early 2010s. Since then, major global and regional powers have increasingly pursued self-interested policies, interventions have become less accepted by host countries, and the UN is more financially constrained. These developments all point towards fewer and smaller interventions. Responses to Covid-19 so far suggest these trends to continue. Arguably, this hampers effective and collaborative action against global challenges such as Covid-19.


Corresponding author: Han Dorussen, University of Essex, Colchester, UK, E-mail:

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Received: 2020-05-18
Accepted: 2020-06-06
Published Online: 2020-07-13

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