Skip to content
BY-NC-ND 3.0 license Open Access Published by De Gruyter July 24, 2012

Surface modification of poly(dimethylsiloxane) and its applications in microfluidics-based biological analysis

  • Qin Tu

    Qin Tu took her Masters and PhD studies with Professor Jinyi Wang at College of Science, Northwest A&F University from 2008 to the present. Her research focuses on the surface modification of poly(dimethylsiloxane) and its applications in microfluidics-based biological analysis, and synthesis of functionalized biomaterials and their applications in biological analysis.

    , Jian-Chun Wang

    Jian-Chun Wang received his BS in Biotechnology from Qingdao Agricultural University in 2008. He joined Professor Jinyi Wang’s research group at Northwest A&F University in the Fall of 2008 to pursue his PhD degree. His current research focuses on the design and fabrication of microfluidics for biomedical applications.

    , Yanrong Zhang , Rui Liu , Wenming Liu , Li Ren , Shaofei Shen , Juan Xu , Lei Zhao and Jinyi Wang

    Jinyi Wang received his PhD in 2002 from Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China. After staying at Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (2002–2004) and University of California at Los Angeles (2004–2006) as a postdoctoral fellow, he joined Northwest A&F University (Yangling, China) as Professor. His current research interests include synthesis of functional nanomaterials and their applications in bioanalysis, microfluidics-and nanotechnology-based biosensors, as well as microfluidicsbased cell biology.

    EMAIL logo

Abstract

Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-based microfluidic systems have been gaining popularity in various applications, particularly for biological analyses because of their non-toxicity, easy fabrication, practical scalability, optical transparency, and low cost. However, because of the inherent hydrophobicity of PDMS-based material, biological samples easily and strongly interact with PDMS surfaces in biological environments, which prevents the immediate use of PDMS-based microfluidics without any surface processing. To date, various surface modification methods and different materials have been utilized to improve the repelling properties of the PDMS surface and to introduce new functional groups. Based on the recent advances in this field, we outline the main strategies utilized in PDMS surface modification in this review. We also present several applications of modified PDMS surfaces in biological analysis, such as biomolecule separation, immunoassay, cell culture, and DNA hybridization.


Corresponding author: Jinyi Wang, College of Science, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100, P.R. China; College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100, P.R. China

About the authors

Qin Tu

Qin Tu took her Masters and PhD studies with Professor Jinyi Wang at College of Science, Northwest A&F University from 2008 to the present. Her research focuses on the surface modification of poly(dimethylsiloxane) and its applications in microfluidics-based biological analysis, and synthesis of functionalized biomaterials and their applications in biological analysis.

Jian-Chun Wang

Jian-Chun Wang received his BS in Biotechnology from Qingdao Agricultural University in 2008. He joined Professor Jinyi Wang’s research group at Northwest A&F University in the Fall of 2008 to pursue his PhD degree. His current research focuses on the design and fabrication of microfluidics for biomedical applications.

Jinyi Wang

Jinyi Wang received his PhD in 2002 from Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China. After staying at Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (2002–2004) and University of California at Los Angeles (2004–2006) as a postdoctoral fellow, he joined Northwest A&F University (Yangling, China) as Professor. His current research interests include synthesis of functional nanomaterials and their applications in bioanalysis, microfluidics-and nanotechnology-based biosensors, as well as microfluidicsbased cell biology.

Received: 2012-5-16
Accepted: 2012-6-15
Published Online: 2012-07-24
Published in Print: 2012-11-01

©2012 by Walter de Gruyter Berlin Boston

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License, which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Downloaded on 22.9.2023 from https://www.degruyter.com/document/doi/10.1515/revac-2012-0016/html
Scroll to top button