Accessible Published by De Gruyter December 5, 2017

Corrigendum to: Functional brain MRI in patients complaining of electrohypersensitivity after long term exposure to electromagnetic fields

Gunnar Heuser and Sylvia A. Heuser
This erratum corrects the original online version which can be found here: https://doi.org/10.1515/reveh-2017-0014

Corrigendum to: Gunnar Heuser and Sylvia A. Heuser. Functional brain MRI in patients complaining of electrohypersensitivity after long-term exposure to electromagnetic fields. Reviews on Environmental Health 2017. Volume 32, Issue 3, pages 291–299. (DOI 10.1515/reveh-2017-0014):

Since the publication of the article, some questions have been raised regarding the controls in the study. For that the authors give some additional information related to the study:

Figures 1–10: The white areas depicted in our pictures show abnormal brain function. Figure 11 is a control picture. The normal brain shows a significant decrease in the white area, if not absence of white in that area.

Figure 11: Lateral view of a normal fMRI. Note absence of abnormal white areas seen in our patient group.

Figure 11:

Lateral view of a normal fMRI. Note absence of abnormal white areas seen in our patient group.

About 7 years ago, Medical Imaging assembled a study of a normal population and fused all functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies into one. This has been used as a reference in all fMRI reports. The control group consisted of adults who had no known medical condition or disease, were nonsmokers, had no exposure to toxic chemicals, were not on prescribed or over-the-counter drugs, and were not abusing alcohol or other recreational substances.

Medical Imaging of Southern California has the following comments regarding their controls: “The area color coded in green in Figure 12 outlines normal activity within the default mode network in the control subjects. Particular attention can be paid to the normal activity demonstrated in the medial orbital frontal lobe in controls as opposed to the subjects with pathology.”

Figure 12: All normal adult controls were fused into one computerized picture which is shown above.

Figure 12:

All normal adult controls were fused into one computerized picture which is shown above.

If grouped according to age, there is no difference in the control fMRIs. This why all controls were fused into one picture via computer, with green being the color chosen to signify normal healthy brain activity in the control group.


Corresponding author: Gunnar Heuser, MD, PhD, Formerly UCLA Medical Center, Department of Medicine, PO Box 5066, El Dorado Hills, Los Angeles, CA 95762, USA, Phone: +(310) 500-0041

Published Online: 2017-12-5
Published in Print: 2017-12-20

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