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Accessible Unlicensed Requires Authentication Published by De Gruyter (A) March 22, 2018

Nominalization in Kakua and the Vaupés influence

Katherine Bolaños

Abstract

In this paper I present the types of nominalization in Kakua, a language spoken by a group of hunter-gatherer peoples from the small Kakua-Nukakan family, inhabitants of the Vaupés area in eastern Colombia. I argue that the nominalization strategies in Kakua have developed from a traceable typical Kakua-Nukakan strategy, into a more Vaupés-like profile of expressing nominalizations, where Kakua had added more nominalization strategies in order for the language to adapt to the types of nominalizations found in many of Kakua’s neighboring languages in the Vaupés area. For this, I will first give a description of the nominalization strategies in Kakua, to later compare them to the nominalization strategies in Nukak, Kakua’s sister language spoken outside of the Vaupés area. The paper concludes with a comparison of nominalization in Kakua and the nominalization strategies found in the surrounding languages.

Acknowledgments

I gratefully acknowledge support for fieldwork on Kakua from from MPI EvA (Leipzig) and LLILAS (UT Austin) from funds granted by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation (Bolaños; Epps). I am enormously grateful to the speakers of Kakua who worked with me and welcomed me into their villages. A version of this paper was presented at the Global Workshop of Nominalizations in the Americas, at the Language and Culture Research Center at James Cook University, in Cairns, in 2014; I thank that audience for their comments. Finally, I thank reviewers and editors of this volume for their helpful comments on this paper.

Abbreviations

1, 2, 3

first, second, third person

abstr

abstract

act.s

stative actant (Mahecha’s examples)

an/anim

animate

a.nmlz

agent nominalization

adjvz

adjectivizer

ass

assertion

cl

classifier

col

collaborative

decl

declarative

emphz

emphatic

evid

evidential

exist

existential

f

feminine

freq

frequentative (Mahecha’s examples)

fut

future

hab

habitual

in/inan

inanimate

inf

inferred

intens

intensifier

loc

locative

m

masculine

nmlz

nominalizer

obj

object

part

partitive

pl

plural

poss

possessive

pst

past

real

realis

rel

relativizer

rem.pst

remote past

sg

singular

sgnf

singular non-feminine

Sp.

Spanish word

ss

same subject

voc

vocative

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Published Online: 2018-3-22
Published in Print: 2018-3-26

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