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Proper names and case markers in Sinyar (Chad/Sudan)

Pascal Boyeldieu EMAIL logo

Abstract

Sinyar, an alleged Central Sudanic language of Western Darfur, is characterized by two distinct and complementary case marker (sub)systems, the distribution of which provides a morphosyntactic justification of the distinction between common nouns and proper names. The paper considers the two case marking types as well as the semantic content of the category of names. It further presents and tries to explain the behavior of several nouns that may also be marked as names. It finally reviews two types of units that show formal affinities with the marking of names, namely absolute locative nouns on one side, and demonstratives and personal pronouns on the other side.

Glosses and abbreviations

!

tonal downstep (tonology)

°-

neutralization of preceding tonal downstep (see fn. 13)

=

equivalent/similar to

1p/2p/3p

1st/2nd/3rd person plural

1pd

1st person plural (dual)

1pe

1st person plural (exclusive)

1pe/d

1st person plural (exclusive or dual)

1pi

1st person plural (inclusive)

1s/2s/3s

1st/2nd/3rd person singular

3

3rd person

Acc

accusative (names, demonstratives, and personal pronouns)

adv

adverbial (nouns)

Adv

adverbial (names, demonstratives, and personal pronouns)

appl

applicative

Ar.

Arabic

c.n.

common noun

detop

detopicalized form

f

female

foc

focalizer (of subject)

fut

future

Gen

genitive (names, demonstratives, and personal pronouns)

imp

imperative

interr

interrogative

ipfv

imperfective

irr. pl.

irregular plural

loc

locative suffix

m

male

neg

negative, negation

Nom

nominative (names, demonstratives, and personal pronouns)

nom

nominative (nouns)

pastneg

past negative

perm

permansive

pfv

perfective

pl

plural

prgr

progressive

prhb

prohibitive

pst

past

rel

relative

SBB

Sara-Bongo-Bagirmi

sg

singular

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Published Online: 2019-11-07
Published in Print: 2019-11-26

© 2019 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston

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