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Highly sensitive fluid sensing due to slow light in pillar-based photonic crystal ring resonators

Hochempfindliche Fluidsensoren auf Basis von Ringresonatoren aus säulenbasierten photonischen Kristallen
Reyhaneh Jannesari

Reyhaneh Jannesari received her M. Sc. degree in Solid State physic from the Isfahan University, Isfaha, Iran in 2003. In 2007s he worked as a research assistant at Christian Doppler Laboratory for Surface Optics at the Johannes Kepler University, Linz, Austria. From 2010 to 2014 she worked as a research assistant at the Institute of semiconductor and Solid State Physics physic, JKU where she obtained her Ph. D. degree with research focused on ‘Experimental and numerical investigations of Si-based photonic crystals with ordered Ge quantum dots emitters’. Since 2015, she is working as a research assistant at the Institute for Microelectronics and Microsensors, JKU, Linz, Austria. Her focus is on application of Photonic crystal on fluid sensing.

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, Thomas Grille

Thomas Grille was born in 1964 in Marburg/Lahn, Germany. After an apprenticeship as a chemical-technical assistant at the NTA Prof. Dr Grübler he became a state-certified process and environmental engineer. Beginning with 1987 he worked on various fields in industry and science, e. g. on GaAs semiconductors and on high-efficiency solar cells at the Fraunhofer Institute, or on power semiconductors in the IGBT Wafer FAB in Lenzburg. Since 2004 he is employed at Infineon technologies Austria AG as a product matrix leader in the MEMS Group for Si-Microphones where he received multiple innovation and high performance awards.

and Bernhard Jakoby

Bernhard Jakoby obtained his Dipl.-Ing. (M. Sc.) in Communication Engineering and his doctoral (Ph. D.) degree in electrical engineering from the Vienna University of Technology (VUT), Austria, in 1991 and 1994, respectively. In 2001 he obtained avenia legendi for Theoretical Electrical Engineering from the VUT. From 1991 to 1994 he worked as a Research Assistant at the Institute of General Electrical Engi-neering and Electronics of the VUT. Subsequently he stayed as an Erwin Schrödinger Fellow at the University of Ghent, Belgium, performing research on the electrodynamics of complex media. From 1996 to 1999 he held the position of a Research Associate and later Assistant Professor at the Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands, working in the field of microacoustic sensors. From 1999 to 2001 he was with the Automotive Electronics Division of the Robert Bosch GmbH, Germany, where he conducted development projects in the field of automotive liquid sensors. In 2001 he joined the newly formed Industrial Sensor Systems group of the VUT as an Associate Professor. In 2005 he was appointed Full Professor of Microelectronics at the Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria. He is currently working in the field of liquid sensors and monitoring systems.

From the journal tm - Technisches Messen

Abstract

A design for a high quality factor photonic crystal ring resonator (PCRR) is presented. The PCRR is based on pillar type photonic crystals, which consist of a hexagonal array of silicon rods. The cavity is created by removing elements from the regular photonic crystal (PhC) grid. Achieving strong confinement of light intensity in the low index region is the advantage of this PCRR. In that manner, the interaction of light and analyte, which can be a liquid or a gas, will be enhanced. The high quality factor of the cavity (Q=1.0229×105), along with strong overlap between the field of the resonant mode and the analyte as well as the low group velocity of PCRR modes yield enhanced light-matter interaction. An enhancement factor of γ=2.127×104 compared to the bulk light absorption in a homogenous material provides the potential for highly sensitive gas detection with a photonic crystal ring resonator.

Zusammenfassung

In dieser Arbeit wird ein Design für einen photonischen Kristall-Ringresonator (Photonic crystal ring resonator, PCRR) mit hohem Gütefaktor präsentiert. Der PCRR basiert auf photonischen Kristallen, welche aus einer hexagonalen Anordnung von Silizium-Säulen durch Entfernen von Säulen aus dem regulären photonischen Kristallgitter erzeugt werden. Die starke Bündelung der Lichtwelle und der daraus resutieren hohen Intensität in Gebieten mit niedrigem Brechungsindex, ist die große Stärke eines PCRR. Auf diese Weise wird eine stark Wechselwirkung zwischen Licht und dem Analyten (flüssig oder gasförmig) ermöglicht. Die hohe Güte des Resonators (Q=1.023×105) und die starke Überlappung des elektrischen Feldes mit dem Analyten bei Resonanz, sowie die niedrigen Gruppengeschwindigkeiten der PCRR-Moden, führt zu einer verbesserten Licht-Materie Wechselwirkung. Ein Verstärkungsfaktor von γ=2.127×104 im Vergleich zur Lichtabsorption einer ebenen Welle in einem homogenen Material, bietet das Potenzial für hochempfindliche Gasdetektion mit solchen photonischen Kristallringresonatoren.


Correction note

Correction added after online publication May 5, 2018: Mistakenly this article was previously published online ahead of print containing the wrong title:

High sensitive fluid sensing due to slow light in pillar-based photonic crystal ring resonators

Hoch empfindliche Fluidsensoren auf Basis von Ringresonatoren aus säulenbasierten photonischen Kristallen

The correct title is:

Highly sensitive fluid sensing due to slow light in pillar-based photonic crystal ring resonators

Hochempfindliche Fluidsensoren auf Basis von Ringresonatoren aus säulenbasierten photonischen Kristallen


About the authors

Reyhaneh Jannesari

Reyhaneh Jannesari received her M. Sc. degree in Solid State physic from the Isfahan University, Isfaha, Iran in 2003. In 2007s he worked as a research assistant at Christian Doppler Laboratory for Surface Optics at the Johannes Kepler University, Linz, Austria. From 2010 to 2014 she worked as a research assistant at the Institute of semiconductor and Solid State Physics physic, JKU where she obtained her Ph. D. degree with research focused on ‘Experimental and numerical investigations of Si-based photonic crystals with ordered Ge quantum dots emitters’. Since 2015, she is working as a research assistant at the Institute for Microelectronics and Microsensors, JKU, Linz, Austria. Her focus is on application of Photonic crystal on fluid sensing.

Thomas Grille

Thomas Grille was born in 1964 in Marburg/Lahn, Germany. After an apprenticeship as a chemical-technical assistant at the NTA Prof. Dr Grübler he became a state-certified process and environmental engineer. Beginning with 1987 he worked on various fields in industry and science, e. g. on GaAs semiconductors and on high-efficiency solar cells at the Fraunhofer Institute, or on power semiconductors in the IGBT Wafer FAB in Lenzburg. Since 2004 he is employed at Infineon technologies Austria AG as a product matrix leader in the MEMS Group for Si-Microphones where he received multiple innovation and high performance awards.

Bernhard Jakoby

Bernhard Jakoby obtained his Dipl.-Ing. (M. Sc.) in Communication Engineering and his doctoral (Ph. D.) degree in electrical engineering from the Vienna University of Technology (VUT), Austria, in 1991 and 1994, respectively. In 2001 he obtained avenia legendi for Theoretical Electrical Engineering from the VUT. From 1991 to 1994 he worked as a Research Assistant at the Institute of General Electrical Engi-neering and Electronics of the VUT. Subsequently he stayed as an Erwin Schrödinger Fellow at the University of Ghent, Belgium, performing research on the electrodynamics of complex media. From 1996 to 1999 he held the position of a Research Associate and later Assistant Professor at the Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands, working in the field of microacoustic sensors. From 1999 to 2001 he was with the Automotive Electronics Division of the Robert Bosch GmbH, Germany, where he conducted development projects in the field of automotive liquid sensors. In 2001 he joined the newly formed Industrial Sensor Systems group of the VUT as an Associate Professor. In 2005 he was appointed Full Professor of Microelectronics at the Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria. He is currently working in the field of liquid sensors and monitoring systems.

Acknowledgment

The authors acknowledge the support of the Austrian COMET program (Linz Center of Mechatronics).

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Received: 2017-12-05
Accepted: 2018-05-01
Published Online: 2018-05-15
Published in Print: 2018-07-26

© 2018 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston

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