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Intramolecular force-compensated hydrogel-based sensors with reduced response times

Intramolekular kraftkompensierte Sensoren auf Hydrogelbasis mit verkürzter Ansprechzeit
Simon Binder

Simon Binder is a research assistant at the Solid-State Electronics Laboratory at Dresden University of Technology. He started his research on microsystem technology and the modeling and simulation of micro-electromechanical systems during his studies of electrical engineering at Darmstadt University of Technology and Dresden University of Technology. In 2014, he worked on the modeling and simulation of an electrostatically tunable micro-electromechanical Fabry-Pérot interferometer for the infrared absorption spectroscopy. Since 2016, he is a full member of the Research Training Group of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft DFG-GRK 1865 “Hydrogel-based Microsystems”. He is a scholarship holder of the German National Academic Foundation and currently works as a PhD student at Dresden University of Technology, Germany.

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and Gerald Gerlach

Gerald Gerlach received M.Sc. and Dr.-Ing. degrees in electrical engineering from the Dresden University of Technology in 1983 and 1987, respectively. He worked in research and development in the field of sensors and measuring devices at several companies. In 1993, he became a full professor at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Technische Universität Dresden. Since 1996 Professor Gerlach has been there the head of the Solid-State Electronics Laboratory. His research is focused on sensor and semiconductor technology, simulation and modeling of micromechanical devices and the development of solid-state sensors, especially pyroelectric infrared sensors and piezoresistive chemical sensors. From 2007 to 2010 Prof. Gerlach served as President of the German Society for Measurement and Automatic Control (GMA). He was Vice President and President of EUREL (The Convention of National Societies of Electrical Engineers of Europe), respectively, from 2007 to 2008. From 2002 to 2009 Prof. Gerlach served as member of the Advisory Board of the VDE (German Association of Engineers in Electrical Engineering, Electronics, Information Technology) and from 2001 to 2012 as chairman of VDE’s Standing Committee for Engineering Education. Since 2013 Prof. Gerlach has been Member of the Advisory Board of DVT – German Association of Technical-Scientific Societies (2013–2016 Chairman). Since 2013 he also has been heading the DFG Research Training Group “Hydrogel-based Microsystems” at TU Dresden.

From the journal tm - Technisches Messen

Abstract

The method of intramolecular force compensation forms a new approach for reducing the response time of hydrogel-based chemical sensors and improving their long-term stability. The principle is based on a single bisensitive hydrogel, that fulfills both the function of a sensor and an actuator. This paper presents the measuring principle, the required bisensitive hydrogel and a sensor setup. The results show the desired bisensitivity of the sensor to the temperature and ion concentration as well as the successful reduction of the response time by more than 50 % compared to the conventional deflection method. The continuous sensor operation with the application of varying measuring solvents indicates a negligibly low hysteresis behaviour.

Zusammenfassung

Die intramolekulare Kraftkompensation stellt ein neuartiges Verfahren dar, mit dem die Ansprechzeit von chemischen Sensoren auf Hydrogelbasis verkürzt und deren Langzeitstabilität verbessert werden kann. Bei dieser Art der Kraftkompensation sind sowohl Sensor- als auch Aktorfunktion in einem einzigen Hydrogel kombiniert. Dieser Beitrag legt die Messmethode, das hierzu notwendige bisensitive Hydrogel und einen entsprechenden Sensoraufbau dar. Die Ergebnisse zeigen, dass sowohl die gewünschte Bisensitivität des Sensors gegenüber der Temperatur und der Ionenkonzentration als auch eine Verkürzung der Ansprechzeit um mehr als 50 % im Vergleich zur herkömmlichen Ausschlagsmethode erreicht werden konnten. Ein kontinuierlicher Sensorbetrieb mit Beaufschlagung variierender Messlösungen weist auf ein vernachlässigbar geringes Hystereseverhalten hin.

Award Identifier / Grant number: 1865

Funding statement: The work presented in this article was funded by the German Research Foundation within the framework of the Research Training Group 1865 “Hydrogel-based Microsystems”.

About the authors

Simon Binder

Simon Binder is a research assistant at the Solid-State Electronics Laboratory at Dresden University of Technology. He started his research on microsystem technology and the modeling and simulation of micro-electromechanical systems during his studies of electrical engineering at Darmstadt University of Technology and Dresden University of Technology. In 2014, he worked on the modeling and simulation of an electrostatically tunable micro-electromechanical Fabry-Pérot interferometer for the infrared absorption spectroscopy. Since 2016, he is a full member of the Research Training Group of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft DFG-GRK 1865 “Hydrogel-based Microsystems”. He is a scholarship holder of the German National Academic Foundation and currently works as a PhD student at Dresden University of Technology, Germany.

Gerald Gerlach

Gerald Gerlach received M.Sc. and Dr.-Ing. degrees in electrical engineering from the Dresden University of Technology in 1983 and 1987, respectively. He worked in research and development in the field of sensors and measuring devices at several companies. In 1993, he became a full professor at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Technische Universität Dresden. Since 1996 Professor Gerlach has been there the head of the Solid-State Electronics Laboratory. His research is focused on sensor and semiconductor technology, simulation and modeling of micromechanical devices and the development of solid-state sensors, especially pyroelectric infrared sensors and piezoresistive chemical sensors. From 2007 to 2010 Prof. Gerlach served as President of the German Society for Measurement and Automatic Control (GMA). He was Vice President and President of EUREL (The Convention of National Societies of Electrical Engineers of Europe), respectively, from 2007 to 2008. From 2002 to 2009 Prof. Gerlach served as member of the Advisory Board of the VDE (German Association of Engineers in Electrical Engineering, Electronics, Information Technology) and from 2001 to 2012 as chairman of VDE’s Standing Committee for Engineering Education. Since 2013 Prof. Gerlach has been Member of the Advisory Board of DVT – German Association of Technical-Scientific Societies (2013–2016 Chairman). Since 2013 he also has been heading the DFG Research Training Group “Hydrogel-based Microsystems” at TU Dresden.

Acknowledgment

Our thanks go to Andreas Krause for his support in the hydrogel syntheses.

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Received: 2019-01-04
Accepted: 2019-02-25
Published Online: 2019-03-22
Published in Print: 2019-04-04

© 2019 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston

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