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Two-component gas sensing with MIR dual comb spectroscopy

Fast and precise monitoring of concentrations despite complex spectra

Doppel-Frequenzkamm-Spektroskopie im mittleren Infrarot für die parallele Detektion von zwei Gaskomponenten
  • Leonard Nitzsche

    M. Sc. Leonard Nitzsche studied physics at the Albert-Ludwigs-University in Freiburg and received his M. Sc. in 2017. Since 2017 he is working at Fraunhofer IPM in Freiburg, Germany and is a PhD student at the Albert-Ludwigs-University in Freiburg with the research focus on dual comb spectroscopy for process applications.

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    , Jens Goldschmidt

    M. Sc. Jens Goldschmidt received his M. Sc. in Microsystems Engineering at the Albert-Ludwigs-University of Freiburg in 2019. He has been working at Fraunhofer IPM in Freiburg, Germany, from 2019 to 2021, where he dedicated his work to the development of a dual frequency comb spectrometer. Since 2021 he is a PhD student at the Albert-Ludwigs-University in Freiburg in the field of spectroscopy with broadband light sources.

    , Armin Lambrecht

    Dr. Armin Lambrecht graduated in physics at University of Karlsruhe in 1985. Since 1986 he has been working at Fraunhofer IPM in Freiburg, Germany. Starting with molecular beam epitaxy for mid infrared lasers he later focused on infrared sensors systems for gas and liquid process analysis. He retired after many years of experience as R&D project manager, department head and business developer, but still works part-time at Fraunhofer IPM.

    and Jürgen Wöllenstein

    Prof. Dr. Jürgen Wöllenstein studied electrical engineering at the University of Kassel until 1997. He is head of department for gas and process analytics at Fraunhofer IPM and leads the laboratory for gassensors at the Albert-Ludwigs-University in Freiburg, department of Microsystems Engineering IMTEK.

From the journal tm - Technisches Messen

Abstract

A dual comb spectrometer is used as gas sensor for the parallel detection of nitrous oxide (N2O) and carbon monoxide (CO). These gases have overlapping absorption features in the mid-infrared (MIR) at a wavelength of 4.6 µm. With a spectra acquisition rate of 10 Hz, concentrations of 50 ppm N2O and 30 ppm CO are monitored with a relative precision of 6 × 10 3 and 3 × 10 3 respectively. The limit of detections are 91 ppb for N2O and 50 ppb for CO for an integration time of 25 s. The system exhibits a linear sensitivity from 2 ppm to 100 ppm with coefficients of determination of 0.99998 for N2O and 0.99996 for CO.

Zusammenfassung

Ein Doppel-Frequenzkamm-Spektrometer wird für die parallele Detektion von Lachgas (N2O) und Kohlenstoffmonoxid (CO) verwendet. Die Gase weisen überlappende Absorptionen im mittleren Infrarot (MIR) bei einer Wellenlänge von 4.6 µm auf. Die Akquisitionsrate der Spektren von 10 Hz erlaubt es die Konzentrationen von 50 ppm N2O und 30 ppm CO mit einer relativen Genauigkeit von 6 × 10 3 und 3 × 10 3 zu verfolgen. Die Detektionslimits sind 91 ppb und 50 ppb für eine Integrationszeit von 25 s. Das System weist eine lineare Sensitivität im Bereich von 2 ppm bis 100 ppm mit den Bestimmtheitsmaßen von 0.99998 für Lachgas und 0.99996 für Kohlenmonooxid auf.

About the authors

Leonard Nitzsche

M. Sc. Leonard Nitzsche studied physics at the Albert-Ludwigs-University in Freiburg and received his M. Sc. in 2017. Since 2017 he is working at Fraunhofer IPM in Freiburg, Germany and is a PhD student at the Albert-Ludwigs-University in Freiburg with the research focus on dual comb spectroscopy for process applications.

Jens Goldschmidt

M. Sc. Jens Goldschmidt received his M. Sc. in Microsystems Engineering at the Albert-Ludwigs-University of Freiburg in 2019. He has been working at Fraunhofer IPM in Freiburg, Germany, from 2019 to 2021, where he dedicated his work to the development of a dual frequency comb spectrometer. Since 2021 he is a PhD student at the Albert-Ludwigs-University in Freiburg in the field of spectroscopy with broadband light sources.

Armin Lambrecht

Dr. Armin Lambrecht graduated in physics at University of Karlsruhe in 1985. Since 1986 he has been working at Fraunhofer IPM in Freiburg, Germany. Starting with molecular beam epitaxy for mid infrared lasers he later focused on infrared sensors systems for gas and liquid process analysis. He retired after many years of experience as R&D project manager, department head and business developer, but still works part-time at Fraunhofer IPM.

Jürgen Wöllenstein

Prof. Dr. Jürgen Wöllenstein studied electrical engineering at the University of Kassel until 1997. He is head of department for gas and process analytics at Fraunhofer IPM and leads the laboratory for gassensors at the Albert-Ludwigs-University in Freiburg, department of Microsystems Engineering IMTEK.

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Received: 2021-09-30
Accepted: 2021-11-18
Published Online: 2021-12-10
Published in Print: 2022-01-31

© 2022 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston

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