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Licensed Unlicensed Requires Authentication Published by De Gruyter Mouton January 23, 2013

The structure of emotion discourse: from Labovian to socio-cognitive models

Manuela Romano

Manuela Romano is Senior Lecturer in English Linguistics at the English Department, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. In her academic career she has been active in several fields: English historical linguistics, semantics, metaphor theory, and narrative studies, all within socio-cognitive approaches to language and discourse. She has been a visiting scholar at the Linguistics Department, University of California, Berkeley and Anglia-Ruskin University, Cambridge. She is currently coordinating the funded research project “Analysis of discourse strategies in persuasive communication.”

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, María Dolores Porto

María Dolores Porto is Senior Lecturer in English Linguistics at the Universidad de Alcalá, Madrid. Her research has always been related to the connections between mind and language and she has mostly worked in the processes of interpretation of discourse, whether literary, technical, academic, or spontaneous. She has been a visiting scholar at the School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics, University of Sheffield, where she carried out some research on text worlds and emotion discourse.

and Clara Molina

Clara Molina is Senior Lecturer in English Linguistics at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, where she coordinates a bachelor degree in multilingual communication. Her research interests fall under the language–culture–cognition umbrella and include topics in multilingualism, language variation and change, lexical semantics and grammaticalization, and blended learning. She is particularly interested in the interface of semasiology and onomasiology and the grammar/semantics continuum.

From the journal Text & Talk

Abstract

This paper focuses on how narrators convey emotion in the structure of oral narrative discourse in Spanish. To this end, the structure of personal oral narratives of highly emotional events in a sample of radio narratives is analyzed from two different approaches: Labovian and socio-cognitive. This work shows, first, how the Labovian approach to personal oral narratives of “vivid” events is applied to emotionally charged texts and, second, how the theoretical concepts of mental spaces and conceptual integration theory, as well as the latest developments within socio-cognitive theories, can help to better understand the processes that, on the one hand, enable speakers to create bonds with the listener, and on the other hand, enable hearers to make sense of the apparently chaotic information presented in these particular types of narratives.

About the authors

Manuela Romano

Manuela Romano is Senior Lecturer in English Linguistics at the English Department, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. In her academic career she has been active in several fields: English historical linguistics, semantics, metaphor theory, and narrative studies, all within socio-cognitive approaches to language and discourse. She has been a visiting scholar at the Linguistics Department, University of California, Berkeley and Anglia-Ruskin University, Cambridge. She is currently coordinating the funded research project “Analysis of discourse strategies in persuasive communication.”

María Dolores Porto

María Dolores Porto is Senior Lecturer in English Linguistics at the Universidad de Alcalá, Madrid. Her research has always been related to the connections between mind and language and she has mostly worked in the processes of interpretation of discourse, whether literary, technical, academic, or spontaneous. She has been a visiting scholar at the School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics, University of Sheffield, where she carried out some research on text worlds and emotion discourse.

Clara Molina

Clara Molina is Senior Lecturer in English Linguistics at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, where she coordinates a bachelor degree in multilingual communication. Her research interests fall under the language–culture–cognition umbrella and include topics in multilingualism, language variation and change, lexical semantics and grammaticalization, and blended learning. She is particularly interested in the interface of semasiology and onomasiology and the grammar/semantics continuum.

Published Online: 2013-01-23
Published in Print: 2013-01-25

©[2013] by Walter de Gruyter Berlin Boston

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