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BY-NC-ND 3.0 license Open Access Published by De Gruyter Open Access April 3, 2012

Evaluation of detection of Toxoplasma gondii DNA in animal blood samples by quantitative PCR

Lenka Luptakova, Alexandra Valencakova, Pavol Balent, Beata Malcekova and Eva Petrovova
From the journal Open Life Sciences

Abstract

Aim of the study: The purpose of this study was to find out the relationship between the phase of infection (acute or persistent) and the ability of quantitative PCR to detect DNA of Toxoplasma gondii in circulating leukocytes in blood. Methodology: Animal serum samples were examined (50 sheep, 47 dogs, 32 dairy cows, 91 wild boars and 36 rabbits) for the occurrence of IgM and IgG antibodies to T. gondii by ELISA. Uncoagulated blood samples from the same animals were examined for the detection of T. gondii DNA in circulating leukocytes by real-time PCR. Results: Only IgM antibodies, characteristic for acute infection, were detected in 45 of the 256 serum samples (17.6%). Only IgG antibodies, corresponding with chronic infection, were detected in 120 of the 256 samples (46.8%). In 91 of the 256 samples (35.5%) neither IgM or IgG were detected by ELISA. For real-time PCR, animals were divided into three groups based on the serological results: (group I — acute infection, group II — chronic infection, and group III — no infection). In group I, the presence of T. gondii DNA was detected in 9 out of 45 samples (20%), whereas in group II only 1 of 120 samples was positive for T. gondii DNA (0.8%). In group III, no DNA of T. gondii (0/91 samples) was detected by real-time PCR. Significance: The proof of DNA by real-time PCR in IgM positive samples was statistically significant in comparison to IgG positive samples (P<0.0001).

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Published Online: 2012-4-3
Published in Print: 2012-6-1

© 2012 Versita Warsaw

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 3.0 License.

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