Accessible Unlicensed Requires Authentication Published by De Gruyter August 22, 2013

Enhancement of Biosurfactant Production from Pseudomonas cepacia CCT6659 Through Optimisation of Nutritional Parameters Using Response Surface Methodology

Steigerung der Biotensidproduktion aus Pseudomonas cepacia CCT6659 über die Optimierung der Ernährungsparameter mit Hilfe der Antwortflächenmethodik
Rita de Cássia F. S. da Silva, Raquel D. Rufino, Juliana M. Luna, Charles B. B. Farias, Hilário J. B. Filho, Valdemir A. dos Santos and Leonie A. Sarubbo

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to optimise the production of a biosurfactant by a new strain of Pseudomonas cepacia CCT6659 with aid of a combination of central composite rotatable design (CCRD) and response surface methodology (RSM). The factors selected for optimisation of the growth conditions were canola waste frying oil, corn steep liquor and NaNO3 substrate concentrations. Surface tension was chosen as the response variable. All factors studied were important within the ranges investigated. The empirical forecast model developed through RSM regarding effective nutritional factors was adequate for explaining 89 % of the variation observed in biosurfactant production. Maximal reduction in surface tension of 26 mN m–1 was obtained under the optimal conditions of 2 % waste frying oil, 3 % corn steep liquor and 0.2 % NaNO3. The accumulation of isolated biosurfactant increased from 2 g L–1 to 8.0 g L–1 under these conditions, demonstrating that the factorial design is adequate for identifying the optimal conditions for biosurfactant production.

Kurzfassung

Ziel dieser Untersuchung war, die Produktion eines Biotensids aus dem neuen Stamm Pseudomonas cepacia CCT6659 mit Hilfe des “Central Composite Rotatable Design” (CCRD) und der “Response Surface Methodology” (RSM) zu optimieren. Die für die Optimierung der Wachstumsbedingungen ausgewählte Faktoren waren die Konzentrationen des Substrats aus gebrauchtem Fritieraltöl aus Raps, Maisquellwasser und NaNO3. Als Antwortvariable wurde die Oberflächenspannung gewählt. Alle untersuchten Faktoren waren innerhalb des untersuchten Bereichs wichtig. Das mit Hilfe der RSM entwickelte Vorhersagemodell für die effektiven Ernährungsparameter eigente sich zur Erklärung von 89 % der beobachteten Variation in der Biotensidproduktion. Man erhielt eine maximale Reduktion der Oberflächenspannng bei folgender optimaler Bedingung: 2 % Frittiertaltöl, 3 % Maisquellwasser und 0,2 % NaNO3. Unter diesen Bedingugnen lag die Anreicherung des isolierten Biotensids zwischen 2 g L–1 bis 8,0 g L–1, womit gezeigt werden konnte, dass die faktorielle Versuchsplanung geeignet ist, die optimalen Bedingugnen der Biotensidproduktion zu ermitteln.


3 Dr. Leonie A. Sarubbo, Centre of Science and Technology, Catholic University of Pernambuco, Rua do Príncipe, n. 526, Boa Vista, Cep: 50050-900, Recife-Pernambuco, Brazil, Tel.: +55 81 21 19 40 48, Fax: +55 81 21 19 40 43, E-Mail address:

Leonie A. Sarubbo was born in Brazil and is graduated in Industrial Chemistry by the Catholic University of Pernambuco (1994), Master in Food Sciences by the Federal University of Pernambuco (1997) and Doctor in Chemical Engineering by the State University of Campinas, Brazil (2000). Currently Dr. Sarubbo is Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry of the Department of Chemical Engineering at the Catholic University of Pernambuco, acting in the Master Program in Environmental Processes Development and in the PhD Research Program of Northeast Biotechnology Network. Dr. Sarubbo is researcher of the Center of Sciences and Technology Laboratories of the Catholic University of Pernambuco since 2001, being responsible for the area of production of biosurfactants in the Biotechnology Sector. Dr. Sarubbo has been published more than 30 scientific papers in the field of biosurfactants. She acts as referee of many scientific journals. Her current research interest is the application of biosurfactants in the environment, in the chemical and food industries. Dr. Sarubbo, is a membership of the Brazilian National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq), acting as ad hoc consultant.

Valdemir Alexandre dos Santos was born in Brazil and is graduated in Industrial Chemistry by the Catholic University of Pernambuco (1978), Master in Chemical Engineering by the Federal University of Pernambuco (1981) and Doctor in Chemical Engineering by the State University of Campinas, Brazil (1996). Dr. Santos is researcher of the Center of Sciences and Technology Laboratories of the Catholic University of Pernambuco since 2008, in the area of modelling of chemical processes and Particulate Systems in the Chemical Sector. Dr. Santos has been published more than 40 scientific papers. He acts as referee of many scientific journals. Dr. Santos is a membership of the Brazilian National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq), acting as ad hoc consultant.

Raquel Diniz Rufino was born in Brazil and is graduated in Biology by the Catholic University of Pernambuco (2004), Master in Micology by the Federal University of Pernambuco (2006) and Doctor in Micology by the Federal University of Pernambuco, Brazil (2000). Dr. Rufino is researcher of the Center of Sciences and Technology Laboratories of the Catholic University of Pernambuco since 2008, in the area of production of biosurfactants in the Biotechnology Sector. Dr. Rufino has been published more than 20 scientific papers in the field of biosurfactants.

Juliana Moura de Luna was born in Brazil and is graduated in Biology by the Catholic University of Pernambuco (2004), Master in Biological Sciences by the Federal University of Pernambuco (2006) and Doctor in Biological Sciences by the Federal University of Pernambuco, Brazil (2000). Dr. Luna is researcher of the Center of Sciences and Technology Laboratories of the Catholic University of Pernambuco since 2008, in the area of production of biosurfactants in the Biotechnology Sector. Dr. Luna has been published more than 20 scientific papers in the field of biosurfactants.


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Received: 2012-7-27
Revised: 2013-1-8
Published Online: 2013-08-22
Published in Print: 2013-03-15

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