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  • Author: Bent Sørensen x
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Abstract

The American polymath C. S. Peirce had no theory of metaphor and he provided only a few remarks concerning the trope. Yet, some of these remarks seem to suggest that Peirce saw the metaphor as fundamental to consciousness and thought. In this article we will try to sketch a possible connection between consciousness and metaphor; a relation where the last mentioned is endowed with a special function within the first mentioned as a cognitive mechanism. We will use Peirce's concept of abduction as a bridge between metaphor and consciousness, since, according to Peirce, abduction is the only semeiotic mechanism that can convey new insights.

Abstract

According to C. S. Peirce, aesthetics has nothing to do with the fine arts. Peirce never fully developed an aesthetic theory and he only put forth very sparse remarks concerning the artist and his work. In the following article, however, we will tentatively relate the artist and his activities to a part of Peirce's aesthetics. We will do this by identifying some consequences from Peirce's concept of the aesthetic ideal, the objectively admirable, and throughout the article, we will lean on Peirce's few remarks concerning the artist and the work of art.

Abstract

According to Charles S. Peirce (1839–1914) the universe is perfused with signs. There is an objective sign-logic at work in the universe which constitutes a growth of concrete reasonableness. However, this process is not value neutral but the Summum Bonum. Man is now cabable of a high degree of self control and can cultivate his habits of feeling, action, and thought in accordance with the ideal. A theory of these efforts of cultivation fall within Peirce's three normative sciences — aesthetics, ethics, and logic. Even though Peirce never did formulate a fully coherent normative theory, there lies in his work an important sketch in understanding the ideal and how it should be followed, and in connection to this a model for rational behaviour including self-control.

Abstract

In order to gain the highest grade of clarity of his concepts, the polyhistor Charles S. Peirce (1839–1914) put forth a pragmatic maxim. Over the years, Peirce defined this maxim in many different ways. However, in the late definitions by the mature Peirce, we get a glimpse of a maxim, which has to serve the self-controlled scientific drive for growth in the concrete reasonableness; it follows that the maxim is endowed with a special normative function. In the following, we will try to understand this special normative function of the maxim in connection to Peirce's realistic teleological metaphysics and the idea of summum bonum.

100 Years of Semiotics, Communication and Cognition

Abstract

In this article we suggest a possible relation between C. S. Peirce's (1839-1914) concept of metaphor and abduction. To our knowledge Peirce never did analyze nor even mention , the two concepts in the same context. But we understand the hypoiconic metaphor as rooted in the abductive mode of inference; the hypoiconic metaphor is part of an intricate relation between experience, body, inference, and guessing instinct as a semeiotic mechanism which can convey novel ideas.

Abstract

The seven short comments presented here investigate branding from a pragmatic semeiotic point of view. Comment 1 touches upon the brand in an extreme scholastic realistic point of view. Comment 2 focuses on how the brand becomes represented through its replica. Comment 3 investigates if a threshold of attraction exists, a level beyond which someone becomes attracted to a given brand. Comment 4 touches upon the relation between the object and its representation. Comment 5 investigates the concept “quality branding,” which is the process whereby something becomes endowed with certain qualities. Comment 6 defines the concept quasi-empathy as the basis for self-identification and attraction to a given brand. Comment 7 defines the fundamental sign as the sense of community.

Abstract

Based on the hypothesis that Peircean semiotics can reveal how the construction of comprehension is at least partly a function of the structure of composition, the scope of this article is to present a new categorization of print advertising. The categorization consists of six different advertising types and is developed on the basis of an analysis of 150 quarto-, half-, and full-page advertisements from the Danish morning paper Berlingske Tidende. There are basically two traditions in advertising research — a semiotic one and a cognitive one. But none of these traditions have been used to suggest a possible relation between composition and the effects of comprehension, as the conceptual foundation for a categorization seems, as does the Peircean variant of semiotics, to be very limited in advertising research as such. Generally seen, the purpose of the development of the present categorization is to show how a Peircean semiotic approach can contribute to advertising research, including ongoing cognitive research in the advertising tradition.