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  • Author: C. Valladares x
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Abstract

The osprey, Pandion haliaetus (L), is a cosmopolitan Falconidae that in the Canary Island (Spain) is considered as “endangered” by the Canary Government. No helminthological data of this host are available for this archipelago due its protected status. Forty three Scaphanocephalus expansus were found from the small intestine of one animal. A morphological and morphometric description is given in this work. The species S. expansus can be considered specialists in ospreys, since it has not been found in any other host. It has been found in Europe, Egypt, Asia and North America. According to the references, this is the first report on the helminth fauna of P. haliaetus in the occidental area of Africa.

Abstract

Three Advanced Oxidation Technologies (UV/H2O2, UV/TiO2 and Electron Beam) have been evaluated using the Electrical Energy per Order (EE/O) figure-of-merit. These processes have been tested on two aqueous treatment systems: the bleaching of methylene blue and the decay of phenol. In general, as expected, for a given process, the EE/O increased as the concentration of the contaminant increased. However, when the three processes were compared for the same system at the same concentration, the EE/Os for the UV/H2O2 and Electron Beam processes were very similar, but the EE/O for the UV/TiO2 was much higher than that for the other two processes. The UV/H2O2 process has the disadvantage that there is an added cost of chemicals (principally H2O2) and the E-beam process has the disadvantage that there is a constant power required to run the apparatus even when the beam is off. Nevertheless, the UV/TiO2 system has an inferior performance relative to the other two processes; the principal reason is probably the low quantum yield (~0.04-0.08) for the generation of hydroxyl radicals on the surface of TiO2 particles.

Abstract

In this study, twenty water samples were collected in the island of Lanzarote, Canary Islands, Spain in order to check for the presence of V. vermiformis strains in these samples. Water samples were cultured on 2% Non-Nutrient Agar (NNA) plates covered with a thin layer of heat killed E. coli and checked daily for the presence of Vermamoeba. After a week, V. vermiformis amoebae were observed in 2 of the 20 processed samples (10%) incubated at room temperature and 37°C. Molecular characterization was carried out by amplifying the 18S rDNA gene and DNA sequencing in order to confirm the identity of the isolated amoebic strains. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the presence of FLA in environmental sources in Lanzarote Island and the first report of Vermamoeba vermiformis in water sources in this island. Furthermore, the two strains isolated in this study were collected in recreational areas with close contact with humans and thus awareness should be raised.