Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items

  • Author: Camille Lecompte x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Both Ĝirsu tablets DP 655 and VS 14, 100 (= AWL 001) deal with the same dikes to be built or repaired and, as argued in this study, refer to the same total length. It is therefore possible to improve our understanding of the tablet VS 14, 100, which seems to show an aberrant mathematical notation that does not correspond to the standard length measures in other pre-Sargonic texts.

Abstract

Two cuneiform texts belonging to a private Belgian collection, respectively an administrative document from the Ur III period and a cone of Gudea bearing a well-known inscription, are published here. The administrative tablet, of unknown provenance, features an interesting onomasticon which is reminiscent of the archives from Puzriš-Dagan, Iri-saĝrig and Nippur.

Abstract:

The two inscribed artifacts discussed in this article were excavated by C. L. Woolley during the seventh field campaign (1928–1929) at Tell al-Muqayyar, ancient Ur, Iraq. The objects were shipped to the British Museum of London in 1930 and 1935 and have never been published in print. These items are presented and analysed here through a review of their textual information, archaeological context, and associated material culture, using unpublished data from the Ur collection kept in the British Museum. This paper is part of a collaborative research project aiming at re-contextualizing the archaic texts from Ur.

The contextual reconstruction presented here draws upon a doctoral research carried out by G. Benati at the University of Turin (Italy), aimed at re-analysing the stratigraphy and materials from the Early Dynastic period excavated at Ur on the basis of the field records and objects kept in museum collections (Benati 2014). The archaic texts from Ur are currently being studied by C. Lecompte, who recently published a group of archaic tablets kept in the British Museum of London (Lecompte 2013). The authors wish to thank the staff of the Middle East Department of the BM for assistance and permission to study the Ur collection. In particular, we would like to thank Jon Taylor and Birger Helgestad for providing us the image used for fig. 4 and for permission to publish it. Information on the finds from Ur excavations can now be found in the Ur Digitization Project online database (http://www.ur-online.org/). We wish also to express our gratitude to Anne Christine Paar and Emmert Clevenstine for correcting our English.

Footnotes

The contextual reconstruction presented here draws upon a doctoral research carried out by G. Benati at the University of Turin (Italy), aimed at re-analysing the stratigraphy and materials from the Early Dynastic period excavated at Ur on the basis of the field records and objects kept in museum collections (Benati 2014). The archaic texts from Ur are currently being studied by C. Lecompte, who recently published a group of archaic tablets kept in the British Museum of London (Lecompte 2013). The authors wish to thank the staff of the Middle East Department of the BM for assistance and permission to study the Ur collection. In particular, we would like to thank Jon Taylor and Birger Helgestad for providing us the image used for fig. 4 and for permission to publish it. Information on the finds from Ur excavations can now be found in the Ur Digitization Project online database (http://www.ur-online.org/). We wish also to express our gratitude to Anne Christine Paar and Emmert Clevenstine for correcting our English.