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  • Author: Jody Jellison x
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Abstract

Oxalic acid secretion by brown rot wood-degrading fungi has been proposed to function in pH control and non-enzymatic biodegradation. Although oxalate production in liquid cultures of brown rot fungi commonly correlates with glucose oxidation, excess oxalate accumulation in wood during oxidative decay could impede Fe3+ reduction by fungal-derived chelators and thus inhibit brown rot. In this study, we pre-treated spruce wood with various oxalate concentrations and subjected it to brown rot decay by Fomitopsis pinicola and Meruliporia incrassata in agar- and soil-block trials. In agar-block microcosms containing wood pre-treated with 0, 1, 10 or 100 mM sodium oxalate, test fungi equalized wood oxalate and pH at week 12 of decay by either increasing or reducing wood oxalate, depending on the pre-treatment. Oxalate reductions in wood were not accompanied by increases in agar oxalate. During soil-block decay of wood pre-treated with 0 or 50 mM oxalate, oxalate and pH regulation were time-dependent and more variable. Wood oxalate levels did not increase with increasing fungal biomass (per ergosterol); however, decreases in oxalate were not explained by enhanced oxalate catabolism activity, Ca2+ import, or translocation of oxalate into the soil. Our results suggest that brown rot fungi may optimize extracellular oxalate during wood decay, and that soil characteristics may influence this dynamic.

Abstract

Two brown-rot wood decay fungi, Fomitopsis pinicola and Meruliporia incrassata, and the white-rot species Phanerochaete chrysosporium were grown for 4 weeks in liquid culture at 0.35, 0.70, 1.05, and 5.00 mM calcium (Ca) and 1.35 and 2.70 mM magnesium (Mg) concentrations. Soluble and total oxalate levels were quantified using a revised ion-exchange HPLC protocol developed specifically for resolving oxalate and other organic acid anions from medium components. Total oxalate concentrations in brown-rot filtrate were not significantly different among treatments; however, soluble oxalate decreased significantly with increasing Ca concentration. Higher Mg concentrations increased soluble oxalate levels only slightly. There was a significant decrease in medium pH at 5.00 mM Ca for all species, as well as an apparent increase in decarboxylation activity in brown-rot fungi. Total and soluble oxalate levels in the white-rot cultures were generally below detection for all treatments. The results show a significant influence of Ca on soluble oxalate concentrations not seen previously in the brown-rot species Postia placenta.

Abstract

Birch and pine wood specimens were colonized by individual isolates of 12 brown-rot, 26 white-rot, six soft-rot and four blue (sap)-stain fungi. Homogenized wood was subsequently extracted in 75% ethyl acetate and centrifuged. The filtered extracts were analyzed for their iron-reducing capabilities using a ferrozine-based assay. Agar fungal cultures were also examined directly using a spot test for iron reduction. Extracts from wood colonized by brown-rot fungi showed significantly greater iron-reducing capability than extracts from wood colonized by white-rot or non-decay fungi. Results of the spot test ratings were highly variable, but in general the greatest color responses were associated with the brown-rot cultures. The ability of brown-rot fungi to produce compounds and/or modify the wood components that reduce iron is of relevance to the “chelator-mediated Fenton mechanism” that has been advanced as a theory for the non-enzymatic degradation of wood by brown-rot fungi.

Abstract

Effects of the heating rate on the physical properties of carbonized wood were investigated by comparing the dimensional shrinkage, electrical resistivity, Young's modulus, and the evolution of turbostratic crystallites in maple hardwood samples carbonized at 600°C, 800°C, and 1000°C under heating regimes of 3°C h-1 and 60°C h-1. Important carbonized wood properties that developed at high temperature and high heating rates could also be produced at slow heating rates and lower temperatures. Furthermore, slow heating rates promoted the formation and growth of graphene sheets in turbostratic crystallites, which had a significant influence on the electrical resistivity and Young's modulus of the carbonized wood. The results indicate that the graphene sheets of turbostratic crystallites formed during wood carbonization were arranged parallel to the axial direction of wood cells and at an angle to the circumference of wood cells in the cross-sectional plane. With regard to the production of carbon products, a decrease in the heating rate may be beneficial for char properties and the prevention of crack production during manufacture of large monolithic carbon specimens from wood and wood-based materials.

Abstract

Modified wood can provide protection against a range of wood deteriorating organisms. Several hypotheses have been put forward regarding the protection mechanisms against wood decaying fungi including fungal enzyme inefficiency due to non-recognition, lower micropore size, and insufficient wood moisture content. The aim of this study was to obtain new insight into the protection manner of furfuryl alcohol (FA) modified Scots pine sapwood (WFA), and to examine biochemical mechanisms and adaptive changes in gene expression utilised by Postia placenta during early colonisation of WFA. Samples were harvested after 2, 4, and 8 weeks of incubation. After 8 weeks, the mass loss (0.1%) and wood moisture content (21.0%) was lower inWFA, than in non-modified Scots pine sapwood samples (W), 26.1% and 46.1%, respectively. Microscopy revealed needle-shaped calcium oxalate crystals, at all harvesting points, most prominently present after 4 and 8 weeks, and only in the WFA samples. Among the findings based on gene profiles were indications of a possible shift toward increased expression, or at least no down regulation, of genes related to oxidative metabolism and concomitant reduction of several genes related to the breakdown of polysaccharides in WFA compared to W.

Abstract

Pine wood (Pinus sylvestris) veneer strips were incubated in acetate buffer containing hydrogen peroxide and Fe ions (Fenton's reagent) to mimic aspects of brown rot decay and to assess the degradation of cellulose in wood via measurement of tensile properties (measured in a zero-span mode). Varying the type of iron (ferrous or ferric sulfate) mixed with H2O2 did not yield significant differences in the rates of H2O2 concentration and tensile strength reduction. However, increasing the amount of wood material (the number of wood strips) in the reaction mixture elevated Fe(III) reduction in solution, indicating that wood constituents participated in this reaction. Increasing concentrations of Fe(III) in the reaction mixture resulted in a decrease in H2O2 in solution. Despite an increase in iron concentration and H2O2 decomposition under these conditions, a uniform and consistent strength loss of 30% was observed at all Fe(III) concentrations tested. At fixed Fe(III) concentrations, increasing the H2O2 concentration linearly increased the strength loss of the veneers up to approximately 50% within 24 h. The addition of a low molecular weight, metal-binding, phenolic compound (2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid) and of a non-chelating hydroquinone to the reaction mixtures entailed a more rapid consumption of H2O2; however, the tensile strength loss of the veneers decreased with increasing concentration of the phenolics. Thus, in contrast to previous studies on cellulose degradation, phenolics reduced the degree of wood decay in a Fenton system.