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  • Author: Qihua Tan x
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Summary

Electronic laboratory notebooks (ELNs) are more accessible and reliable than their paper based alternatives and thus find widespread adoption. While a large number of commercial products is available, small- to mid-sized laboratories can often not afford the costs or are concerned about the longevity of the providers. Turning towards free alternatives, however, raises questions about data protection, which are not sufficiently addressed by available solutions. To serve as legal documents, ELNs must prevent scientific fraud through technical means such as digital signatures. It would also be advantageous if an ELN was integrated with a laboratory information management system to allow for a comprehensive documentation of experimental work including the location of samples that were used in a particular experiment. Here, we present OpenLabNotes, which adds state-of-the-art ELN capabilities to OpenLabFramework, a powerful and flexible laboratory information management system. In contrast to comparable solutions, it allows to protect the intellectual property of its users by offering data protection with digital signatures. OpenLabNotes effectively closes the gap between research documentation and sample management, thus making Open- LabFramework more attractive for laboratories that seek to increase productivity through electronic data management.

Summary

Selecting the most promising treatment strategy for breast cancer crucially depends on determining the correct subtype. In recent years, gene expression profiling has been investigated as an alternative to histochemical methods. Since databases like TCGA provide easy and unrestricted access to gene expression data for hundreds of patients, the challenge is to extract a minimal optimal set of genes with good prognostic properties from a large bulk of genes making a moderate contribution to classification. Several studies have successfully applied machine learning algorithms to solve this so-called gene selection problem. However, more diverse data from other OMICS technologies are available, including methylation. We hypothesize that combining methylation and gene expression data could already lead to a largely improved classification model, since the resulting model will reflect differences not only on the transcriptomic, but also on an epigenetic level. We compared so-called random forest derived classification models based on gene expression and methylation data alone, to a model based on the combined features and to a model based on the gold standard PAM50. We obtained bootstrap errors of 10-20% and classification error of 1-50%, depending on breast cancer subtype and model. The gene expression model was clearly superior to the methylation model, which was also reflected in the combined model, which mainly selected features from gene expression data. However, the methylation model was able to identify unique features not considered as relevant by the gene expression model, which might provide deeper insights into breast cancer subtype differentiation on an epigenetic level.

Abstract

Modeling complex time-course patterns is a challenging issue in microarray study due to complex gene expression patterns in response to the time-course experiment. We introduce the generalized correlation coefficient and propose a combinatory approach for detecting, testing and clustering the heterogeneous time-course gene expression patterns. Application of the method identified nonlinear time-course patterns in high agreement with parametric analysis. We conclude that the non-parametric nature in the generalized correlation analysis could be an useful and efficient tool for analyzing microarray time-course data and for exploring the complex relationships in the omics data for studying their association with disease and health.

Summary

Measuring differential methylation of the DNA is the nowadays most common approach to linking epigenetic modifications to diseases (called epigenome-wide association studies, EWAS). For its low cost, its efficiency and easy handling, the Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip and its successor, the Infinium MethylationEPIC BeadChip, is the by far most popular techniques for conduction EWAS in large patient cohorts. Despite the popularity of this chip technology, raw data processing and statistical analysis of the array data remains far from trivial and still lacks dedicated software libraries enabling high quality and statistically sound downstream analyses. As of yet, only R-based solutions are freely available for low-level processing of the Illumina chip data. However, the lack of alternative libraries poses a hurdle for the development of new bioinformatic tools, in particular when it comes to web services or applications where run time and memory consumption matter, or EWAS data analysis is an integrative part of a bigger framework or data analysis pipeline. We have therefore developed and implemented Jllumina, an open-source Java library for raw data manipulation of Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 and Infinium MethylationEPIC BeadChip data, supporting the developer with Java functions covering reading and preprocessing the raw data, down to statistical assessment, permutation tests, and identification of differentially methylated loci. Jllumina is fully parallelizable and publicly available at http://dimmer.compbio.sdu.dk/download.html