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  • Author: Susanne Schuster x
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Abstract

In 1904 the German district administrator in Saipan, Georg Fritz, published the first German-based Chamorro dictionary. Only four years later a revised and considerably enlarged edition of this dictionary was published. This paper examines these two editions closely to shed light not only on the linguistic fieldwork of Georg Fritz in the Northern Marianas but also on the situation of the Chamorro language at the beginning of the 20th century. I contrast the two editions of the dictionary from a lexicographical point of view to highlight similarities and differences. This approach shows one of the main reasons for the re-edition: Fritz still pursues his declared objective to provide as much lexical material as possible to clarify the genealogical position of the Chamorro language within the Austronesian phylum.

Abstract

Place names play a crucial role in understanding how people relate to landscapes through language. By giving names to geographical features, colonizers claim authority not only over these places but also over indigenous cultures and people. For this reason, the evaluation of colonial toponyms is an important aspect of colonial and postcolonial linguistics. With its long-lasting colonial history, Greenland (Kalaallit Nunaat) is a suitable candidate for such a toponymic case study. The arctic island shows a multitude of toponyms from various European source languages. This paper intends to give an account of their structural and functional properties in order to reveal similarities which could support a prototypical practice of colonial name giving, as well as differences to show how specific naming patterns might be motivated by the intentions of the colonizers and by particular contact situations.

Current Perspectives and New Approaches
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Sprache in kolonialen Kontexten
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