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  • Author: Thomas Kempa x
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Abstract

This paper deals with the question how to use the creative resources of students in translation classes. It starts from the basic premise that every explicit concscious action, like formulating a translation, has its basis in implicit knowledge (cf. Joachim Renn, Übersetzungsverhältnisse). The explicitation of implicit knowledge always is an individual creative act which potentially differs (similar to Derrida’s differance) from every other act of translating the same item. By inducing the students to accept the fact of the creativity of human action the question of right and wrong in translation is relativized without abandoning a pragmatic grounding for the ensuing differing translations.

Abstract

The solar power received by Earth far exceeds global power demands. Despite this, infrastructure shortages and high capital costs prevent the wide-scale adoption of photovoltaics to displace conventional energy technologies relying on carbon-based fuels. In response, new concepts and materials have been explored to develop next-generation solar cells capable of operating more efficiently and cheaply. Over the past decade, single semiconductor nanowire (NW) and NW array devices have emerged as promising platforms with which to examine new concepts. Small distances in NWs allow for efficient charge separation while tunable photonic modes permit light absorption properties distinct from bulk materials. Furthermore, the synthesis and fabrication of NW devices presents new opportunities such as with incorporation of complex heterostructures or use of cheaper substrates. Here, we present a critical discussion of the benefits and remaining challenges related to utilization of NWs for solar energy conversion and emphasize the synthetic advances leading towards significant improvement in the electrical and optical performance of NW devices. We conclude by articulating the unique capabilities of solar cells assembled from multiple, distinct NWs.

Abstract

Host–guest interactions mediate many chemical and biochemical transformations and are extensively exploited in a number of industrially-relevant chemical processes. Many porous inorganic (e.g., zeolite) and molecular (e.g., metal-organic framework) hosts engage reagents in their environment through selective host–guest interactions. While researchers frequently capitalize on host–guest interactions to sequester chemical species or to catalyze reactions, these interactions can also be used to direct nanomaterial synthesis. In this Perspective we highlight the promise and opportunities for harnessing host–guest interactions to control the structure and dimensionality of materials. We focus our discussion on emerging strategies in soft chemistry and promising new directions which use porous ionic solids to direct the growth of complex nanoscale dimers and Janus nanoparticles.