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  • Author: Thomas Zahnert x
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Abstract

The middle ear plays a crucial role in the quality of hearing. This complex construct performs different tasks like the protection against large air pressure input, the transmission of sound and its adaption to the inner ear impedance. Traumas, erosion by chronic otitis media or cholesteatoma, as well as other degenerative or damaging diseases, are reasons for a necessary reconstruction of specific middle ear structures. The reconstruction of the ossicular chain is very often performed by using rigid ossicular replacement prostheses made out of titanium, ceramics or bone. Tilting and dislocation of these passive implants are some of the known complications after middle ear surgery. They are related to loads at the implant coupling points in response to a tension change in the middle ear. The healing process, scar tension and ventilation problems are possible causes.

To increase the sound transmission quality of total reconstructions and safety in case of pressure dependent movement of the tympanic membrane, a novel flexible total ossicular replacement prosthesis (TORP) with a silicone coated ball joint prototype was developed and investigated. Besides measurements of first middle ear transfer functions of temporal bones, the mechanical properties of the flexible TORP were examined with stress relaxation investigations.

The novel silicone coated ball and socket joint TORP provides a sound transfer equivalent to the intact human middle ear at normal pressure and negative pressure in the middle ear. Together with the low stiffness values at an anatomically typical deflection of about 500 μm the prevention of a stiffening of the stapes annular ligament could be approved. Thus, improved acoustic transmission quality and reconstruction stability in comparison to common rigid titanium TORP could be determined. Nevertheless, further design improvements should be accomplished. The demonstrated flexible TORP can solve some common problems in middle ear reconstruction.

Abstract

Endoscopic optical coherence tomography is a non-invasive and contactless imaging technique based on white light interferometry. It enables high-resolution three-dimensional imaging of scattering tissue up to a depth of about 2 mm. In addition, Doppler-OCT can detect sub-resolution movements. These features can be used to examine the tympanic membrane, the surrounding tissue and nearby areas of the tympanic cavity. For this purpose, we present an endoscopic OCT system, which provides access to the tympanic membrane. The design of the endoscope is based on a gradientindex (GRIN) lens system. This allows a broad field of view and a large working distance. An additional VIS beam path allows visual imaging and orientation inside the auditory canal. Therefore, illumination fibers are attached a round the GRIN-system. The resulting endoscope has a length of 55 mm and a diameter of 3.5 mm. By attaching an earphone and a probe microphone, the oscillation of the tympanic membrane can be measured under acoustic stimulation. With the endoscopic OCT system, we provide an examination tool for the diagnosis of a broad number of diseases like conductive hearing loss.

Abstract

The treatment of otitis media requires classifying the effusion in the tympanic cavity for choosing appropriate therapeutic strategies. Otoscopic examination of the middle ear depends on the expertise of the physician and is often hampered in case of inflammatory alterations of the tympanic membrane. In otologic research, optical coherence tomography is an innovative non-invasive imaging technique utilized for visualizing the tympanic membrane. This ex vivo study presents the possibility of OCT and Doppler-OCT for the detection of effusions in the tympanic cavity. Structural OCT imaging allows the direct visualization of scattering fluids behind the tympanic membrane. In addition, the measurement of the reduced oscillation amplitude by means of Doppler-OCT permits the indirect detection of scattering and transparent fluids.

Abstract

In this ex vivo feasibility study, endoscopic structural and functional optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging with a field of view of 8 mm is presented allowing the inspection of nearly the entire tympanic membrane through the ear canal. The endoscope utilizes a gradient index optics for simultaneous OCT and video endoscopy. Additionally, Doppler-OCT allows the measurement of the tympanic membrane oscillation. Due to the fast image acquisition, only minor motion artifacts have been observed, which don’t affect the image quality. In conclusion, endoscopic OCT is considered as a promising tool for the comprehensive examination of the human middle ear.