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  • Author: Yasemin Erdoğan Döventaş x
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Abstract

Objective:

Adenosine deaminase (ADA) specifically catalyzes the deamination of adenosine which has been proved to play an important role in modulation of insulin action on glucose metabolism. Zinc is an essential micronutrient that is directly involved in the physiology of insulin and may be an important agent to activate the ADA. We aimed to evaluate serum ADA activity, zinc levels and the relationship between these two parameters in diabetes mellitus.

Methods:

We investigated serum ADA activity and zinc levels in type I (n = 100) and type II diabetes mellitus patients (n = 151).

Results:

ADA activities of diabetic patients were significantly elevated, whereas zinc levels were significantly lower than those of healthy controls (p < 0.001). Compared with the well-controlled diabetic patient groups (HbA1c < 7%), the poorly controlled diabetic groups (HbA1c > 8%) showed significantly increased ADA activity (p < 0.001). In contrast, zinc concentrations in the poorly controlled diabetic groups were not significantly different from those in the well-controlled diabetic patients (p = 0.246). Significant positive correlation was observed between ADA activity and HbA1c (r = 0.794). There was no correlation between ADA activity and zinc levels (r = 0.043; p > 0.05).

Conclusion:

Elevated ADA activity in diabetic patients with poor glycemic control may be a useful marker for therapy modulation.

Abstract

Introduction:

The aim of our study was to investigate the vascular endothelial growth factor levels in joint swelling-positive and joint swelling-negative rheumatoid arthritis patients and to then examine the relationship between conventional parameters such as the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and the levels of C-reactive protein, rheumatoid factor, and anti-cyclic citrullinated protein.

Methods:

Fifty-nine (52 women and seven men) rheumatoid arthritis patients and 25 (20 women and five men) healthy individuals volunteered for this study. The patient group was divided into two sub-groups based on whether or not they exhibited joint swelling.

Results:

The levels of vascular endothelial growth factor in the joint swelling-negative group were significantly different from those in the joint swelling-positive group, but they were not different from those in the control group (p=0.001 and p=0.72, respectively). We investigated the correlation between vascular endothelial growth factor and C-reactive protein levels (r=0.37, p=0.001). We also evaluated the diagnostic adequacy of vascular endothelial growth factor and created a ROC curve. The area under the curve was calculated to be 0.767.

Conclusion:

Vascular endothelial growth factor is an adequate diagnostic biomarker and can successfully be used to predict the occurrence of rheumatoid synovitis based on local inflammation.