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7 Jesko Fezer · Martin Schmitz The Work of Lucius Burckhardt Lucius Burckhardt was bold for he claimed that design is invisible. He was exasperating for he asked why landscape is beautiful. He was persistent for he doggedly asked who actually plans the plan- ning. He was egalitarian for he addressed issues such as “livability” and everyday life. He was provocative. He declared the night and dirt to be a focus of his research. He was realistic insofar as he es- tablished that to build or to design is a process. He was rebellious for he made a science out of

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Why Is Landscape Beautiful? Birkhäuser Basel Lucius Burckhardt Why Is Landscape Beautiful? The Science of Strollology edited by Markus Ritter and Martin Schmitz Editors Markus Ritter CH-Basel Martin Schmitz D-Berlin martin-schmitz.de lucius-burckhardt.org Translation from German into English: Jill Denton, D-Berlin Copyediting: Andreas Müller, D-Berlin Layout, cover design and typography: Ekke Wolf Typesetting: Sven Schrape, D-Berlin Printing and Binding: Strauss GmbH, D-Mörlenbach Originally published in German as Warum ist Landschaft schön? Die

The Science of Strollology

314 Biography Lucius Burckhardt (* Davos, 1925) gained a PhD in Basel then became a research assistant at the Social Research Center at Münster University in 1955. A guest lec- tureship at Ulm University of Applied Arts in 1959 was followed from 1961 to 1973 by several teaching assignments, including a guest lectureship in sociology at the Architecture Faculty of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich). He worked simultaneously as editor-in-chief of the journal Werk from 1962 to 1973, was First President of the German Werkbund from 1976 to

309 Bibliography Strollology. A minor subject (Strollology als Nebenfach = Spaziergangswissen- schaften—ein Gespräch zwischen Hans Ulrich Obrist, Annemarie und Lucius Burckhardt), auf www.kunstaspekte.de/diskurs). Strollology—a conversation during a taxi-ride in Bordeaux between Hans Ulrich Obrist and Annemarie and Lucius Burckhardt, on the occasion of the exhibition “Mutations.” – In: Inhabituel, exhib. cat., Dena Foundation for Contemporary Art, Paris 2005, p. 34–37 (Eng.), 164–165 (Ital.), 178–180 (Ger.). In: Mira Cómo se Mueven, See how They Move, exhib

7 Strollology. A Minor Subject. In Conversation with Hans Ulrich Obrist During a taxi ride through Bordeaux in the year 2000, on the oc- casion of the exhibition “Mutations,” Hans Ulrich Obrist talked with Annemarie and Lucius Burckhardt about an emergent new science, the questions it poses, its methodology, and its cultural and historical background. Hans Ulrich Obrist: Can you tell me how the science of walking began? Annemarie Burckhardt: It began very gradually … Lucius Burckhardt: We held a seminar on the subject of how lan- guage conveys the look of

– Kirchberg. Luxembourg die Stadt. Luxembourg 2006; no page 11 cf. Burckhardt, Lucius: “Vom Entwurfsakademismus zur Behandlung bösartiger Probleme” (1973) in: Burckhardt, Lucius: Die Kinder fressen ihre Revolution. Wohnen – Planen – Bauen – Grünen. Cologne 1985; p. 226 ff. 12 Rittel, Horst/Webber, Melvin M.: “Planning Problems are Wicked Problems” (1973) in: Cross, N. (ed.): Developments in Design Metho- dology. Chichester 1984; pp. 134 – 144 13 Rittel, Horst/Webber, Melvin M.: “Dilemmas in der allgemeinen Theorie der Planung” in: Rittel, Horst: Planen, Entwerfen, Design

2006; o.s. 11 vgl. Burckhardt, Lucius: „Vom Entwurfsakademismus zur Behandlung bösartiger Probleme (1973)“ in: Burckhardt, Lucius: Die Kinder fressen ihre Revolution. Wohnen – Planen – Bauen – Grünen. Köln 1985; s.226 ff. 12 Rittel, Horst/Webber, Melvin M.: „Planning Problems are Wicked Problems“ (1973) in: Cross, N. (Hrsg.): Developments in Design Metho- dology. Chichester 1984; s.134 – 144 13 Rittel, Horst/Webber, Melvin M.: „Dilemmas in der allgemeinen Theorie der Planung“ in: Rittel, Horst: Planen, Entwerfen, Design. Stuttgart 1992; s.21 14 Latz, Peter

for lawyers or the test tube is for chemists, the spherical box bush is a sym­ bol. the world in our minds consists more than ever of images. so what do we see in our mind’s eye for the glob­ al terms “sustainability” or “sustainable development”? Design is invisible – that much we know since Lucius Burckhardt’s seminal essay of the same name. not be­ cause we can’t see the designed object in question but rather because it is part of a larger, invisible system that is in turn the subject of design. For example, a tram as a designed object is just a small part