Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 54 items :

  • "Defence of the Constitutions of the United States" x
Clear All
The Story of John and Abigail Adams in Europe

Constitutions of the United States of America, for example, has been described with such terms as “dense,” “discon- nected,” and “without introductions or transitions.”15 Emotional Intelligence. Benjamin Franklin was on the mark when he declared that “sometimes and in some things” Adams was “abso- lutely out of his senses.” Adams was aware of his own emotional vol- atility. As he put it in a letter to Benjamin Rush, there were “very 03 Greenstein 24-33.indd 32 5/19/2009 12:35:13 PM John Adams 33 many times in my life when I have been so agitated in my own mind as to

Cultural shifts: and biblical language, 102–3; and Native Americans as Israelites theory, 148; to New Testament, 154–63 Cunaeus, Petrus, 54 Curse of Meroz, 34–41, 43 The Curse of Meroz (Finley), 36 Dan, tribe of, 132 Dana, James, 61 Daniel, 92, 162 David, 25, 81, 92, 96, 121, 187 Davies, Samuel, 35 Davis, Jefferson, 187 Deborah, 13, 36, 38, 43 Declaration of Independence, 73, 188 Defence of the Constitutions of the United States (Adams), 56–57 Defoe, Daniel, 56 Deism, 127 Democracy, 74 Democratization: and free will, 160; and Hebraic political studies, 53, 64; lan

, 18, 20– 26; public views on, 10 Council of Profi t Sharing Indus- tries, 157 Cox, William, 143 Coxe, Tenche, 4, 24 craftspeople vs. wage slaves, 125– 126 Crédit Mobilier scandal, 127– 128 Croly, Herbert, 32 crony capitalism, 21, 145– 146 Dahl, Robert, 32 Dansko, 95 Declaration of In de pen dence, 30 A Defense of the Constitutions of the United States (Adams), 28 Defi cit Reduction Act, 270n22 Demo cratic Capitalism (Carey), 158 demo cratic government, purpose of, 20 Democracy Collaborative, 270n21 Dennison Manufacturing case, 147 Doucouliagos, Christopher, 171

and Costs Less (National Performance Review), 256 credentialing, 185, 245–47 Crèvecoeur, Hector St. John de, 19 Croly, Herbert, 125, 194 CSRA. See Civil Service Reform Act, 1978 cultural capital, 248 Curtis, George W., 195 Dana, Richard H., Jr., 90 Dartmouth College, 76, 78, 79 Darwin, Charles, 85, 97, 99, 131–32 Darwin, Leonard, 132 Davis, Kingsley, 237, 246 Decatur, Stephen, 50, 51, 266 Defence of the Constitutions of the United States of America (Adams), 31, 42–43, 73 De la manière d’enseigner et d’etudier les belles lettres

in Merit

Nation to Empire 89 fi rst nation based on virtue, not force, ‘since the days of the Roman republic.’77 A er the unsuccessful invasion of Quebec in 1775, John Adams declared: ‘Flight was unknown to the Romans . . . I wish it were to the Americans.’78 Adams’s A Defence of the Constitutions of the United States of America (1787) asserted that ‘the Roman constitution formed the noblest people, and the greatest power, that ever existed.’79 He con- trasted the aristocratic republic of Rome and the democratic republic of Carthage and thought the commercial

, 60, 62; Rousseau and, 59–60; tears of, 117–18 cunning, 84–90, 93 D’Avenant, William, 149 deception: effects of, 7–12; language and, 121–41; Morley and, 154–55 Declaration of Independence, 75 Defence of the Constitutions of the United States (Adams), 97 Deists, 82–83 democracy, ix, 1; Adams and, 102–3, 208–9; anti-hypocrisy and, 184–93, 196–202; Bentham and, 137–41, 206–8; as cant of modern world, 130, 206–8; con- cealment and, 32–33; fictions and, 137–41; futility of protest and, 197–200; grandiose claims for, 207–8; imperialism and, 181–84, 202–4; impossible sin

Dedham, Massachusetts: covenant of, 43 “Defense of the Constitutions of the United States” (Adams), 62 deism, 67, 71, 85 deliberative democracy, 199, 214 demagoguery, 64 Democracy and Social Ethics (Addams), 118 democratic republicanism, 84, 88–96, 98, 105–6; John Dewey and, 114; Frederick Douglass and, 92–96; Abraham Lincoln and, 88–92 demonization, 22, 56, 57, 181 dependency: culture of, 82; Jane Addams on, 119; John. C. Calhoun on, 87; Fred‑ erick Douglass on, 94; Ronald Reagan on, 176–77, 188 desire, 29, 177 Dewey, John, 10, 111–16; Aristotle

. 258 CHAPTER 6 seen in John Adams's Defence of the Constitutions of the United States and in the writings of the Antifederalists. This pattern of influence reflects a general feature of Sidney's writ- ings and the story of his life: they were most at home among "oppo- sition" writers. It was no accident that both the Federalists and the Antifederalists turned from Locke and Sidney to Montesquieu dur- ing the debates over the ratification of the Constitution,101 for the Spirit of the Laws provided a wealth of detail concerning historical con- stitutions and a

., 67, 78 Creek Nation, 87–88 Cromwell, Oliver, 15 Crowninshield, Benjamin, 67 Cuban Missile Crisis, 1, 4–5 Cunningham, Noble, 72 Dahl, Robert A., 103 Dearborn, Henry, 41 decentralized government, 18–19, 79 Declaration of Independence: Adams, John, and, 27; Jefferson and, 35, 38; preamble of, 35, 38; Wythe and, 37 Defense of the Constitutions of the United States of America (Adams), 32 Delaware River, 14 Democrats, 67, 93 Diary (Adams), 25 Dinwiddie, Robert, 12 diplomacy: Cuban missile crisis and, 1, 4–5; French language and, 77; Missouri Compromise and, 69