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The Markan pericope on Jesus’ exorcism of the Gerasene demoniac (Mark 5,1–20) raises several questions as to which story it conveys. The Transjordanian location of the “district of Gerasenes” (5,1) has been deemed geographically problematic, since Gerasa is at a great distance from rather than in the immediate vicinity of the Sea of Galilee (cf. 5,1.13).  See e. g. Robert A. Guelich, Mark 1–8:26 , WBC 34A (Dallas: Word Books, 1989), 275; Ben Witherington III, The Gospel of Mark: A Socio-Rhetorical Commentary (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2001), 179–180; Richard T

typical roadside shrine 85 13. An elaborate marble shrine 86 14. Devotions suspended beneath an icon of St. Nektarios 94 15. Cosmological drawing (on a cigarette box) by a young man from Apefranthos 114 16. A cosmopolitan artist's depiction of the "Picasso-nosed female kallikdntzaros'' 133 17. Christ exorcising the Gerasene demoniacs 142 18. The heavenly ladder of St. John Climacos 145 19. Fresco by Pag6nis, "The Wily Confessions of Christians" 147 20. St. Christopher, the Dog-Headed 155 21. A gorgona on the wall of a seaside restaurant 158 22. Icon of the

δαιμονιξό- μενοι?) λέγοντες Τί ήμιν και coi, υίέ του θεού; ηλθεο ώδε προ καιρού acavicai Mt vacat. ι See below. * Matthew's omission of Mk 7, 32—37 and 8, 22—26 is not real but apparent See Bacon, Sermon on the Mount, p. 206—209. 156 W. W. Bucnn, The Markan Theory of Ocmonic Rccognltion of the Christ. The diflerence is that in Mark the instance of the Gerasene demoniac is normative (with Mk 5, 6 cf. 3, n; with 5, 7 cf. i, 24. 34); whereas in Matthcvv it is unique, simply a stränge incident The inferences of Mark elsewhere arc in Matthcw avoided, partly by omission, partly

Gerasene demoniac 111 on the brink of the well, waiting the return of his disciples, who had gone to the city for provisions. It was about noon, when a woman came over to draw water; Jesus asked her to give him a drink from the pitcher she held; but the Samaritan, who knew from his countenance that he was a Jew, was astonished at his request, [as there was no trade, or even good relations between orthodox Jews and the Samaritans; according to the custom of partisans of different sects, they most cordially detested each other.5 The Messiah, who was not so

. , n‑ n,, n; theology of, –, , , n, n; use of Scripture, , n Eustathios of Antioch, , n Exodus, narrative of, , , n, n, n Ezekiel, n, n, n; critique of religious leaders, –; and investigation, –,    fasting, , , n   Gabriel. See angels Gehazi, –, n, n Gerasene demoniac, , n God: and the Bible, –, –, , n, n; and creation, ; divine investiga‑ tion, –, –, n, n; divine law, ; divine transcendence

:22–30 and the larger narrative to two portions of the Gospel, a story and a speech. I demonstrate how these features appear in the story of the Gerasene demoniac (5:1–20) and in the Olivet discourse (13:5–37). These sections are important to Mark’s Gospel because Mark 5:1–20 is the longest miracle story, and 13:5–37 is Jesus’ longest speech. I show that these two parts of the nar- rative develop key themes about Jesus’ mission and about Jesus’ follow- ers first established in 3:22–30. In particular, I demonstrate how these sections expand the story line evoked in 3

dip in the deep, the environs of Gerasa … create no problem for the story«, was hier als Hinweis auf die Historizität verstanden ist. Neuerdings hat J. Ådna versucht, auch die Schweinepisode als historisch wahrschein- lich zu erweisen: The Encounter of Jesus with the Gerasene Demoniac, in: B.D. Chilton/ C.A. Evans (ed.), Authenticating the Activities of Jesus (NTTS 28/2), Leiden 1999, 279–301. 2 C.E. Arnold, Exorcism 101: What Can We Learn from the Way Jesus Cast Out Demons?, ChrTo 45 (2001) 58. – K. Blessing, Call not Unclean: The Pigs in the Story of the Legion of

Contents IX Chapter 5: Mark’s Apocalyptic Discourse in a Story (5:1–20) and a Speech (13:5–37) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 5.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 5.2 The Gerasene Demoniac (5:1–20) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 5.2.1 Approaching 5:1–20 as an Apocalyptic Story . . . . . . . . 172 5.2.2 Narrative Context . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 5.2.3 Analysis of Mark 5:1–20 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175 5

. 12, 274 n. 3, 275 n. 9; Appointed as “Son of God”: 122–125; And Beel- zebul: see “Beelzebul: Relationship with Jesus”; “Beelzebul accusation” in General Index; Christology of: see “Christology” in General Index; As exorcist: 5, 34, 37, 63, 163, 220 n. 1; And the Gerasene demoniac: 60–62, 73–74, 79–80, 84–86, 91–92, 94–95, 98–100; As “holy spirit”: 130; As possessed: 8, 19, 21, 24, 31, 33–34, 37–38, 44, 51, 53, 55–59, 131, 162–163 (see also: “Beelzebul: Relationship with Jesus”); Relatives of: 33, 57, 216 n. 19; As shaman: 20; As spirit: see “Spirit

of 425 verses deal directly or indirectly with miracles, in other words, 47 percent.¹² Mark apparently inherited miracle stories from many different streams of first-generation Christian tradition.¹³ We find blocks of miracle stories (e.g., the stilling of the storm, the exorcism of the Gerasene demoniac, and the raising of the daughter of Jairus with the healing of the woman with the hemor- /620/ rhage in 4:35–5:43), individual miracle stories surrounded by other types of ma- terial (e.g., the demoniac boy in 9:14–29), miracle stories embedded in larger cy- cles