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7 2 Grammatical Features 2.1 Introduction a The modern language and Classical Syriac The transition from Post-Classical Syriac to the modern literary lan‐ guage was gradual. Literary activity never ceased. However, the emigration of Syriac Orthodox to the West, particularly to Western Germany, Holland and Sweden, gave rise to an important change in the late 20th century. New opportunities due to extended free‐ dom of expression resulted in a flow of publications in literary Syriac and a corresponding influx of borrowed or calqued technological, political and

Colloquial American English: grammatical features Thomas E. Murray and Beth Lee Simon 1. Introduction Conventional wisdom has long dictated that, excluding the dialects used in New England, the South, and such northern cities as New York and Chicago, and aside from many ethnic-based vernaculars (Chicano English, Pennsyl- vania Dutch, and the like), nothing very interesting occurs in the grammar of American English. From the early twentieth century well into the 1950s, some linguists even used “General American” to describe what they perceived as a monolithic

Colloquial American English: grammatical features Thomas E. Murray and Beth Lee Simon 1. Introduction Conventional wisdom has long dictated that, excluding the dialects used in New England, the South, and such northern cities as New York and Chicago, and aside from many ethnic-based vernaculars (Chicano English, Pennsylvania Dutch, and the like), nothing very interesting occurs in the grammar of American English. From the early twentieth century well into the 1950s, some linguists even used “General American” to describe what they perceived as a monolithic

Qualitative and quantitative analysis of grammatical features elicited among the Gbe language varieties of West Africa ANGELA KLUGE JALL 27 (2006), 53–86 0167–6164/06/027-0053 DOI 10.1515/JALL.2006.004 ©Walter de Gruyter Abstract This paper describes a synchronic analysis of grammatical features elicited among the Gbe language varieties of West Africa, conducted to explore how the investigated varieties might be treated as clusters and to establish priori- ties for further sociolinguistic research. For some of the investigated varieties, the current synchronic

volume ). However, although language contact has been investigated in a variety of linguistic contexts ( Gardner-Chloros 2009 ; Myers-Scotton 1976 ; Matras 2009 ; Stell and Yakpo 2015 ; Muysken 2014 ), still little is known about the grammatical features of these mining languages, which sometimes develop forms and syntactic constructions that are not observed in the respective contact varieties, and, aside from a publication by Auer and Cornips (2018) and Pecht (2015) , the silence becomes absolute when one looks for an understanding of grammatical features of

DOI 10.1515/ijsl-2013-0056   IJSL 2013; 224: 63 – 84 Abdulmohsen A. Dashti Interacting with domestic workers in Kuwait: grammatical features of foreigner talk. A case study Abstract: From the beginning of modern sociolinguistics, a major goal has been the study of speech communities characterized by language contact. Languages don’t actually come into contact with each other. It is always the speakers of the languages who are in contact. This article is a sociolinguistic investigation of a simplified Kuwaiti Arabic form that Kuwaitis use when interacting

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0165–2516/12/0215–0019 Int’l. J. Soc. Lang. 215 (2012), pp. 19 – 40 © Walter de Gruyter DOI 10.1515/ijsl-2012-0027 Contact-induced change in status planning: a case study of Zhuang Putonghua* LU HAI and FANGLAN LI Abstract Due to increased contact with the Zhuang language since the beginning of the 1990s, Putonghua spoken by Zhuang people bears distinctive traits of their mother tongue. Taking Chengxiang Town as an example, this article analyzes the influence of Zhuang on Zhuang Putonghua’s phonological, lexical and grammatical features. Keywords: Zhuang

. 2.1 Modifications to input or output One cognitive criticism of grammar instruction is that internal processing makes explicit emphasis of grammatical features ineffective and unnecessary ( VanPatten 2014 ). A reason given for this assertion is the Poverty of Stimulus (POV) argument, which holds that because learners acquire a language from a finite set of examples within input, an innate mechanism must exist to guide the learning process ( Berwick et al. 2011 ; Foraker et al. 2009 ). There is considerable support for this theory. Learners appear able to identify