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Alkaloids of Datura ceratocaula Strahil Berkov Department of Applied Botany, Institute of Botany, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 23, Acad. G Bonchev Str., 1113-Sofia, Bulgaria. Fax: +3592719032. E-mail: berkov@iph.bio.bas.bg Z. Naturforsch. 58c, 455Ð458 (2003); received November 25/December 27, 2002 Thirty-six alkaloids were identified in the organs of Datura ceratocaula by GC/MS. Thirty- three of them have not been previously reported for the species. Furthermore, a new tropane ester was tentatively identified as 3-(3-formyloxytropoyloxy)tropane on basis of its

0939 – 5075/2009/0500 – 0311 $ 06.00 © 2009 Verlag der Zeitschrift für Naturforschung, Tübingen · http://www.znaturforsch.com · D Introduction Sternbergia colchicifl ora Waldst. & Kit. is an amaryllidaceous plant distributed in the Mediter- ranean region (Webb, 1980). Due to its small size, it has no economic or ornamental value, and there is no data on its use in folk medicine. Plants of the family Amaryllidaceae are known for their specif- ic alkaloid composition. To our knowledge, three species of nine in the genus Sternbergia have been phytochemically

Tropane Alkaloids from Latua pubiflora Orlando Muñoza,* and John F. Casaleb a Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Las Palmeras 3425, Santiago, Chile. E-mail: omunoz@uchile.cl b US. Department of Justice, Drug Enforcement Administration, Special Testing and Research Laboratory, 22624 Dulles Summit Court, Dulles, VA 20166 USA * Author for correspondence and reprint requests Z. Naturforsch. 58c, 626Ð628 (2003); received January 21/March 27, 2003 Four known tropane alkaloids were isolated from the leaves of the endemic Chilean plant Latua pubiflora

Notizen 347 New Alkaloids from Prosopis julißora DC Viqar Uddin Ahmad, Anwer Basha, and Wasimul Haque H. E. J. Postgraduate Institute of Chemistry, University of Karachi, Karachi-32, Pakistan Z. Naturforsch. 33 b, 347-348 (1978); received October 21, 1977 Prosopis juliflora, Piperidine Alkaloids The isolation of three new alkaloids from Prosopis julifiora is reported. A structure for the minor alkaloid julifloridine is suggested. Prosopis juliflora DC. (mesquite) grows abun- dantly as a weed in Sind and Punjab Provinces of Pakistan. In view of the

Alkaloids of Adenocarpus hispanicus (Lam.) DC Varieties Gerhard Veena, Roland Greinwald3, Paloma Cantób, Ludger Wittec, and F.-C. Czygan3 a Institut für Pharmazeutische Biologie der Universität Würzburg, Mittlerer Dallenbergweg 64, D-W-8700 Würzburg, Bundesrepublik Deutschland b Departamento de Biologia Vegetal II, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid, Spain c Institut für Pharmazeutische Biologie der TU Braunschweig, Mendelssohnstraße 1, D-W-3300 Braunschweig, Bundesrepublik Deutschland Z. Naturforsch. 47c, 341-345 (1992); received

GC-MS of Crinum latifolium L. Alkaloids Nguyen Thi Ngoc Trama, Maya Mitovab, Vassya Bankovab, Nedyalka Handjievab and Simeon S. Popovb,* a Vietnam Pharmaceutical Corporation, Laboratory for Chemistry and Technology of Natural Substances, 24 Nguyen Thi Nghia Str., Dist.1, Ho Chi Min City, Vietnam b Institute of Organic Chemistry with Centre of Phytochemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1113 Sofia, Bulgaria. Fax: ++359-700-225. E-mail: simpopov@orgchm.bas.bg * Author for correspondence and reprint request Crinum latifolium L., Amaryllidaceae, Alkaloids Z

Alkaloids in Bulgarian Pancratium maritimum L. Strahil Berkova,*, Luba Evstatievaa, and Simeon Popovb a Institute of Botany, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 23 Acad. G. Bonchev Str., 1113 Sofia, Bulgaria. Fax: +3592719032. E-mail: berkov@iph.bio.bas.bg b Institute of Organic Chemistry with Centre of Phytochemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 9 Acad. G. Bonchev Str., 1113 Sofia, Bulgaria * Author for correspondence and reprint requests Z. Naturforsch. 59c, 65Ð69 (2004); received May 22/July 7, 2003 A GC/MS analysis of alkaloids from leaves, bulbs and roots of

Alkaloids of Anuran Skin: Antimicrobial Function? Cyrus Macfoya, Douglas Danosusa, Raj Sandita, Tappey H. Jonesb, H. Martin Garraffoc, Thomas F. Spandec, and John W. Dalyc,* a Biology Department, American University, Washington, D. C., USA b Laboratory Chemistry, Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, Virginia 24450-0304, USA c Laboratory of Bioorganic Chemistry, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, DHHS Bethesda, Maryland 20892-0820, USA. E-mail: jdaly@nih.gov * Author for correspondence and reprint

© 2012 Verlag der Zeitschrift für Naturforschung, Tübingen · http://znaturforsch.com Introduction Aconitum (wolfsbane) species are very toxic plants due to thei diterpenoid alkaloid content. These alkaloids are neurotoxic agents, caus- ing bradycardy, muscle system spasms, hypoten- sion, and death by arrest of respiration. Aconi- tum preparations have been used in very diluted forms as cardiotonics, febrifuges, sedatives, and anodynes. Today Aconitum is very popular in ho- moeopathy and is included in many pharmaceuti- cal products (Bisset, 1981; Benn and