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BASIC INCOME STUDIES An International Journal of Basic Income Research Vol. 1, Issue 2 RESEARCH NOTE December 2006 Basic Income in 1848∗ Guido Erreygers University of Antwerp John Cunliffe University of Warwick Abstract – This note introduces a virtually unknown social constitution drafted in Brussels in 1848, in which an unconditional basic income figured prominently. We provide details on the historical and intellectual context in which the proposal originated, and briefly compare it with similar proposals of the same period. In the appendix, we

BASIC INCOME STUDIES An International Journal of Basic Income Research Vol. 5, Issue 1 RESEARCH ARTICLE April 2010 Near-Universal Basic Income* Nir Eyal Harvard University Abstract – Under what I call “Near-Universal Basic Income,” or NUBI, everyone receives a high level of basic income, except for the rich. NUBI is therefore only near- universal and it requires means-testing. It is an economic hybrid: a cross between Universal Basic Income (UBI) and conservative social relief. My thesis is that if standard considerations that are often advanced to

BASIC INCOME STUDIES An International Journal of Basic Income Research Vol. 6, Issue 2 RESEARCH NOTE December 2011 Debate: “Should Libertarians Endorse Basic Income?” Guest editor: Daniel D. Moseley, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Runner-up for the 2011 BIS Essay Prize Locke on Basic Income∗ Daniel Layman University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Abstract – Perhaps the strongest attempts to derive support for basic income policy from John Locke’s political philosophy hinge on Locke’s view that the world and its resources were

demand we have now. It’s a Keynesian problem. The only solution to this would be the distribution of government vouchers, or a basic, or citizen’s income. Brynjolfsson and McAfee reject basic income proposals on the grounds that this would disincentivise work, but Malcolm Torry in his 2013 book on citizen income Money for Everyone convincingly shows this argument to be wrong. Basic income is in fact the only solution to ultimate pervasive automation. Keynes is noted for his comment on the phenomenon of technology creating output with vastly reduced labour input

BASIC INCOME STUDIES An International Journal of Basic Income Research Vol. 3, Issue 2 RESEARCHARTICLE August 2008 Rawlsian Stability and Basic Income* Søren F. Midtgaard Aarhus University Abstract – This article assesses Van Parijs’s proposal for an unconditional universal basic income according to the Rawlsian criterion of stability—a criterion Van Parijs arguably shares. First, I examine a number of stability‐generating features of conceptions of justice that pertain to their scope and content. Second, I evaluate these features relative to an unconditional

BASIC INCOME STUDIES An International Journal of Basic Income Research Vol. 5, Issue 2 RESEARCHARTICLE December 2010 Runner up for the 2008 BIS Essay Prize Basic Income and Social Value Bill Jordan University of Plymouth Abstract – This article suggests that the justification of basic income should take account of the evidence of a divergence between growing incomes and stagnating subjective well‐being (SWB) in the affluent countries. It argues that this implies taking the debate outside the orthodox model of economic development and the strict methodological

BASIC INCOME STUDIES An International Journal of Basic Income Research Vol. 2, Issue 2 RESEARCH NOTE December 2007 Basic Income and Economic Integration Bill Jordan University of Plymouth Abstract – This article addresses some of the issues raised for the Basic Income (BI) principle by global economic integration; especially the argument that a new model of reciprocity between affluent and developing economies does not require, and might be undermined by, this approach. In that view, complementarity between an Anglophone version of capitalism and an

BASIC INCOME STUDIES An International Journal of Basic Income Research Vol. 4, Issue 1 RESEARCH ARTICLE April 2009 Basic Income or Caretaker Benefits? Amy L. Wax University of Pennsylvania Law School Abstract – Feminists have long taken the position that society should commit itself to the support of individuals who care for others. In this view, governments should subsidize “caretaking units,” consisting of adults supporting dependents in need of care and assistance. This article undertakes to assess a proposal for the public support of caretaking

charity, but rather under a principle of justice, compensation for exclusion from a fair share of the commons. Several proposals for an unconditional basic income (BI) emerged in the last centuries but it was during the twentieth century that the debate became more concrete and structured ( Vanderborght & Van Parijs, 2005 ). From a fringe idea, the discussions around the unconditional basic income have entered some of the most important global forums of discussion ( De Wispelaere & Haagh, 2019 ). Despite the existence of different proposals, there are three features

1 Basic income and experimentation in the Netherlands Unconditional basic income has been regularly discussed in the Netherlands in the last forty years, being rejected every time, and reappearing after a period of silence. It is a radical idea. Its appeal is far stronger in society than it is in mainstream politics, which is still firmly wedded to the traditional ethos of work. To many in the Netherlands it now seems as if basic income’s time has finally come, following the wide interest in experiments which aim to decouple social assistance grants from duties