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1 Introduction Relatively small economies like Hong Kong, Malaysia and Hungary are usually more open to international trade than large country economies like Japan and USA because the latter conduct plenty of trade within their borders ( Feenstra and Taylor 2012 ). The State of Qatar is a geographically small country with a total population of more than two million people, land area of 11,571 square km, and a Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of $200 billion ( Ministry of Development Planning and Statistics 2014 ). The country has high food import dependency, with

Volume 9, Issue 1 2012 Article 25 Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management The Multiplicity of Actors Involved in Securing America's Food Imports Shweta Gopalakrishnan, Kansas State University Colleen Cochran, Kansas State University Daniel A. Unruh, Kansas State University Dr. Justin Jon Kastner, Kansas State University Recommended Citation: Gopalakrishnan, Shweta; Cochran, Colleen; Unruh, Daniel A.; and Kastner, Dr. Justin Jon (2012) "The Multiplicity of Actors Involved in Securing America's Food Imports," Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency

Volume 3, Issue 1 2012 Article 7 Journal of Biosecurity, Biosafety and Biodefense Law The Role of Regulations in Minimizing the Bioterrorism Threat to Food Imports Bryan Tate, Texas Tech University School of Law Recommended Citation: Tate, Bryan (2012) "The Role of Regulations in Minimizing the Bioterrorism Threat to Food Imports," Journal of Biosecurity, Biosafety and Biodefense Law: Vol. 3: Iss. 1, Article 7. DOI: 10.1515/2154-3186.1036 ©2012 De Gruyter. All rights reserved. The Role of Regulations in Minimizing the Bioterrorism Threat to Food Imports Bryan

Volume 1, Number 1 2003 Article 5 Review of Middle East Economics and Finance Water Scarcity and Food Imports: An Emperical Investigation of the 'Virtual Water' Hypothesis in the MENA Region Hassan Hakimian, Cass Business School Recommended Citation: Hakimian, Hassan (2003) "Water Scarcity and Food Imports: An Emperical Investigation of the 'Virtual Water' Hypothesis in the MENA Region," Review of Middle East Economics and Finance: Vol. 1: No. 1, Article 5. DOI: 10.2202/1475-3693.1004 Volumes 1-3 of Review of Middle East Economics and Finance were originally

XVII AGRICULTURAL GROWTH AND FOOD IMPORTS IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES A Reexamination ROMEO M. BAUTISTA Introduction The relationship between agricultural growth and food imports in developing countries has recently attracted renewed interest among agricultural and trade economists. This is largely in reaction to the strong opposition by farm lobbies in the United States to development assistance programs abroad that promote foodgrain production allegedly to the detriment of U.S. agricultural interests; which in turn was stimulated by the substantial fall

2. Indonesia: Transition from Food Importer to Exporter C. Peter Timmer As countries move along the path of economic development, the objectives of their price policies tend to become broader. One major text (Gillis et al., 1983) includes food prices as one of the key macro prices available to policy makers as they attempt to induce an economy down the path of economic development. The World Bank, the International Monetary Fund (IMF), and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) have identified "distorted" agricultural prices as a

commodities. On the other hand, a rise in global food prices stemming from adverse climate events that restrict the supply of food is likely to generate different impacts on domestic output depending on patterns of specialization. Food-exporting economies may experience a positive spending effect to the extent that their net export earnings improve, while the opposite effects may be observed for food-importing economies. The propagation effects of the initial spending effects are also likely to vary depending on the share of food commodities in household consumption

products which are used as food sources in Asian countries. Increasing biofuel consumption is exacerbating this problem. To address it, the governments of Asian countries are working on biofuel programs which will not compete with food security. Most of the Asian countries are food-importing countries. Increasing food prices, due to competition, could lead to social unrest. It is expected that the introduction and development of second-generation biofuels can mitigate the competition between food and energy. As various countries develop second- generation biofuels

machinery and other manufacturing goods. In appreciation of the detrimental economic effects of this situation on SSA countries, the EU has had one of the oldest and most generous preferential schemes for the benefit of these countries. This article argues, based on detailed analysis of EU food import law and its application to livestock products coming from East Africa, that these otherwise generous preferential schemes have been deprived of any effect by the stringent sanitary and phytosanitary requirements that are beyond the capacity of the producers in these

A Comparative Study