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Poznań Studies in Contemporary Linguistics 49(2), 2013, pp. 261–274 © Faculty of English, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań, Poland doi:10.1515/psicl-2013-0009 THE STATUS OF ADVERBS IN BRITISH MONOLINGUAL LEARNER’S DICTIONARIES: LEMMATA OR RUN-ONS ALENKA VRBINC a AND MARJETA VRBINC b University of Ljubljana a alenka.vrbinc@ef.uni-lj.si b marjeta.vrbinc@ff.uni-lj.si ABSTRACT Strict alphabetical ordering of lemmata in a dictionary may be interrupted by the nesting of derivatives as run-ons at the end of the entry for the lemma

404 Appendix 1) A Checklist of Monolingual Learner’s Dictionary Features and Choices Physical Format – print dictionary or electronic dictionary Independence of the Text – standalone text or combined with a thematic dictionary (a thesaurus dictionary) – if combined: a semasiological A-Z MLD and a TLD combined in a single volume or on a single CD-ROM, or in separate volumes – the standard MLD and the companion thematic dictionary may be linked or not linked (by cross-references or hyperlinks) Inclusion – regional

Kevin Pike The long and the short of it: a brief study of the coverage and retrieval processes of shortened forms in English online monolingual learner’s dictionaries from an EFL-user perspective 1 Introduction 2 Clarification of terminology and typology 2.1 Electronic dictionaries: online monolingual learner’s dictionaries (OMLD) 2.2 Shortened forms 3 Shortenings in the three OMLDs 3.1 Locating the shortenings in the OMLDs: POS-tagging anomalies 3.2 The coverage of shortenings in the three OMLDs 4 For what purposes do EFL learners primarily consult a dictionary

and will, by means of a questionnaire completed by EFL learners at the Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), specifically address a number of the main linguistic problems encountered by EFL-learners with regard to shortened forms. To begin with, the terminology used within this text will be adumbrated. 2 Clarification of terminology and typology 2.1 Electronic dictionaries: online monolingual learner’s dictionaries (OMLD) The term electronic dictionary – now often referred to as a ‘digital dictionary’ ( Wiegand 2010 : 88) – is used to describe a

of multiple PoS labels; consequently, the user no longer needs to identify each and every part of speech of the word in ques- tion. Another simplification of the microstructure regarding the inclusion of phraseologi- cal units is that all phraseological units with one common element belonging to different parts of speech are simply grouped together in one special idioms section without dis- tinction between individual parts of speech. KEYWORDS: Monolingual learner’s dictionaries; PoS labelling; retrieval of information; dictionary users. 1. Introduction

Abstract

This paper presents the comparison of sense discrimination strategies including the structure and organization of a polysemous word entry in five English monolingual learner’s dictionaries with the aim of gaining an insight into the aspects of sense division where the given dictionaries agree and disagree. The final outcome of the analysis is the selection of features contributing to the establishment of the user friendliest sense discrimination system in a pedagogical dictionary.

Abstract

This paper presents the comparison of sense discrimination strategies including the structure and organization of a polysemous word entry in five English monolingual learner’s dictionaries with the aim of gaining an insight into the aspects of sense division where the given dictionaries agree and disagree. The final outcome of the analysis is the selection of features contributing to the establishment of the user friendliest sense discrimination system in a pedagogical dictionary

linguistics onto lexi- cography in different fields. I argue, therefore, that the application of cognitive semantic theories to differ- ent areas of lexicographic practice can improve traditional elements of dictionary structure and make the information offered more accessible to dictionary users. I will attempt to demonstrate as well that different areas of lexicographic practice can be used for what I eventually call cognitive lexicography (cf. chapter 4.3 below). For my project, I have decided to work with monolingual learner’s dictionaries, and have chosen three