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Eine linguistische Konzeptanalyse
Der Diskurs über Schulamokläufe
Multilingual and Metalinguistic Conversations about Religion
Repräsentation und Rezeption historischen 'Wissens' als soziale Praxis
Eine diskurs- und soziolinguistische Analyse von Spracheinstellungen in internetbasierten Forendiskussionen

Abstract

Storytelling provides opportunities for children to practise displays of affective stance. Children’s spontaneous tellings are noticeable as systematic and organized work, which are locally occasioned and triggered by a prior utterance where emotional responses are as significant as the tellings themselves. Affective stances are often observed in children’s tellings, encouraging children’s disposition to learn through active engagement with others, learning acceptable behaviours in meaningful social and cultural ways. This article explores how displays of heightened affect are prompted and responded to and progress the development of storylines within young children’s everyday storytelling. The data were collected in early childhood kindergartens in New Zealand and analysed using conversation analysis. The findings show that there is often elaboration/escalation of a telling, as peers respond by including additional characters within a continued topic in a display of heightened emotion shown through voice pitch and tone, as well as overt facial and bodily expression. Opportunities for practising displays of ‘correct’ emotional responses to tellings are important for young children in contributing to everyday socialising practises through real-life everyday experiences.

Abstract

This paper analyses how representations of real life and fictional worlds are combined and differentiated in the talk produced in literary reading groups. We adopt a socio-cognitive approach to reading group interaction, which combines discourse analysis and Text World Theory to examine the social and cognitive processes enacted in examples of such talk. Text World Theory is a cognitive linguistic discourse analysis framework which examines the mental spaces (“worlds”) cued by language-in-use and the ontological relations between those worlds. This combined framework is applied to four extracts of reading group talk and facilitates the discussion of the structural, referential and representational aspects of the interaction. Our analysis considers the insights which reading group talk provides into the complex relationships between text and talk. We argue that ontological shifting in reading group talk performs various functions, such as claiming expertise, doing humour and play, and mitigating face-threatening disagreement. Talking about texts allows people these options for shifting between representations of real life and fictional worlds and this may go some way towards accounting for the popularity of such groups in contemporary culture.

Abstract

This study contributes to research into genre innovation and scholarship exploring how Indigenous epistemes are disrupting dominant discourses of the academy. Using a case study approach, we investigated 31 research articles produced by Mäori scholars and published in the journal AlterNative between 2006 and 2018. We looked for linguistic features associated with self-positioning and self-identification. We found heightened ambiguous uses of “we”; a prevalence of verbs associated with personal (as opposed to discursive) uses of “I/we”; personal storytelling; and a privileging of Elders’ contributions to the existing state of knowledge. We argue these features reflect and reinforce Indigenous scholars’ social relations with particular communities of practice within and outside of the academy. They are also in keeping with Indigenous knowledge-making practices, protocols, and languages, and signal sites of negotiation and innovation in the research article. We present the implications for rhetorical genre studies and for teaching academic genres.