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Abstract

Dis/ability History Goes Public erprobt, wie ein innovatives, fächerübergreifendes Wissenschaftsfeld vermittelt werden kann. Der Band bündelt erstmals Experimente, Initiativen und Vorschläge, die zeigen, wie man Dis/ability History und Dis/ability Studies in verschiedenen Öffentlichkeiten zugänglich und für die konkrete Gestaltung gesellschaftlicher Teilhabe nutzbar machen kann. Die Beiträge aus diversen fachwissenschaftlichen und didaktischen Disziplinen bieten praxisorientierte Gebrauchsanleitungen für alle, die Forschung, Wissenschaftskommunikation und praktizierte Partizipation verbinden möchten.

Abstract

Dis/ability History Goes Public erprobt, wie ein innovatives, fächerübergreifendes Wissenschaftsfeld vermittelt werden kann. Der Band bündelt erstmals Experimente, Initiativen und Vorschläge, die zeigen, wie man Dis/ability History und Dis/ability Studies in verschiedenen Öffentlichkeiten zugänglich und für die konkrete Gestaltung gesellschaftlicher Teilhabe nutzbar machen kann. Die Beiträge aus diversen fachwissenschaftlichen und didaktischen Disziplinen bieten praxisorientierte Gebrauchsanleitungen für alle, die Forschung, Wissenschaftskommunikation und praktizierte Partizipation verbinden möchten.

Abstract

In the past, our ideas of psychiatric hospitals and their history have been shaped by objects like straitjackets, cribs, and binding belts. These powerful objects were often used as a synonym for psychiatry and the way psychiatric patients were treated, yet very little is known about the agency of these objects and their appropriation by staff and patients. By focusing on material cultures, this book offers a new perspective on the history of psychiatry: it enables a narrative in which practicing psychiatry is part of a complex entanglement in which power is constantly negotiated. Scholars from different academic disciplines show how this material-based approach opens up new perspectives on the agency and imagination of men and women inside psychiatry.

Abstract

Despite the efforts of modern scholars to explain the origins of science communication as a social, rhetorical, and aesthetic phenomenon, most researchers approach the popularization of science from the perspective of present issues, thus ignoring its historical roots in classical culture along with its continuities, disruptions, and transformations.

This volume fills this research gap with a genealogically reflected introduction into the popularization of science as a recurrent cultural technique. The category »popular science« is elucidated in interdisciplinary and diachronic dialogue, discussing case studies from all historical periods.

Classicists, archaeologists, medievalists, art historians, sociologists, and historians of science provide the first diachronic and multi-layered approach to the rhetoric techniques, aesthetics, and societal conditions that have shaped the dissemination and reception of scientific knowledge.

Abstract

Digital Humanities is a transformational endeavor that not only changes the perception, storage, and interpretation of information but also of research processes and questions. It also prompts new ways of interdisciplinary communication between humanities scholars and computer scientists. This volume offers a unique perspective on digital methods for and in the humanities. It comprises case studies from various fields to illustrate the challenge of matching existing textual research practices and digital tools. Problems and solutions with and for training tools as well as the adjustment of research practices are presented and discussed with an interdisciplinary focus.

Abstract

Practices of comparing shape how we perceive, organize, and change the world. Supposedly innocent, practices of comparing play a decisive role in forming categories, boundaries, and hierarchies; but they can also give an impetus to question and change such structures. Like almost no other human practice, comparing pervades all social, political, economic, and cultural spheres. This volume outlines the program of a new research agenda that places comparative practices at the center of an interdisciplinary exploration. Its contributions combine case studies with overarching systematic considerations. They show what insights can be gained and which further questions arise when one makes a seemingly trivial practice – comparing – the subject of in-depth research.

Abstract

Practices of comparing shape how we perceive, organize, and change the world. Supposedly innocent, practices of comparing play a decisive role in forming categories, boundaries, and hierarchies; but they can also give an impetus to question and change such structures. Like almost no other human practice, comparing pervades all social, political, economic, and cultural spheres. This volume outlines the program of a new research agenda that places comparative practices at the center of an interdisciplinary exploration. Its contributions combine case studies with overarching systematic considerations. They show what insights can be gained and which further questions arise when one makes a seemingly trivial practice – comparing – the subject of in-depth research.

Abstract

Im Zuge der Etablierung des »New Materialism« wird die Bedeutung von Objekten für menschliche Gesellschaften neu verhandelt. Welches Potenzial dieser Neue Materialismus für Geschichtswissenschaft und Geschichtsdidaktik hat, ist bisher nur ansatzweise ausgelotet worden, doch es scheint vielversprechend: Wenn Sachquellen nicht als passive Überreste gedeutet werden, sondern auch als Akteure der Gegenwart, wenn sie gesichertes Wissen über die Vergangenheit ermöglichen, dann sind sie in besonderem Maße geeignet, historisches Lernen zu fördern. Oder sind gegenständliche Objekte der interpretativen Willkür genauso ausgeliefert wie jede andere Quelle?

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Abstract

In the past, our ideas of psychiatric hospitals and their history have been shaped by objects like straitjackets, cribs, and binding belts. These powerful objects were often used as a synonym for psychiatry and the way psychiatric patients were treated, yet very little is known about the agency of these objects and their appropriation by staff and patients. By focusing on material cultures, this book offers a new perspective on the history of psychiatry: it enables a narrative in which practicing psychiatry is part of a complex entanglement in which power is constantly negotiated. Scholars from different academic disciplines show how this material-based approach opens up new perspectives on the agency and imagination of men and women inside psychiatry.