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—the state of the dictatorship of the pro- letariat: during the period of transition from capitalism to communism, it is the proletariat that needs the state. The third stage—the communist society: the state is not necessary, it withers away.” This doctrine implies that the state as such is a ‘state of exception’; thereby the dictatorship of the proletariat, as a form of state, is the state of exception that is used to engender the stateless mode of existence. For Agamben (2005: 2), modern totalitarianism is a form of legal civil war that allows for the

Strategies of Resistence to De-Stalinisation in the USSR, 1953-62, in: The Leader Cult in Communist Dictatorships. Stalin and the Eastern Bloc, hg. von Balász Apor u. a., Basingstoke u. a. 2004, S. 227-245. Jones, Stephen, Georgia. A Political History since Independence, London 2013. Kirchick, James, Statue of Limitations. A Russian-Georgian War–over Stalin, in: The New Republic 02.09.2010, S. 8-10. Kozlov, Vladimir A., Massovye besporjadki v SSSR pri Chruščeve i Brežneve (1953-načalo 1980-ch gg.), (Archiv novejšej istorii Rossii. Serija „Issledovanija“, 1

Quellen- und Literaturverzeichnis Quellen Deutscher Pavillon, Die Zukunf t verhält sich immer anders. The future always acts dif ferently. Liam Gillick im Deutschen Pavillon Venedig 2009, Presse‑ mitteilung Mai 2008. La Biennale di Venezia, Dreams and Conf licts. The Viewer’s Dictatorship, Pres‑ semitteilung 2003. La Biennale di Venezia, Utopia Station, Pressemitteilung 2003. Stiftung Galerie für Zeitgenössische Kunst Leipzig, Zurück nach Morgen, Pressemitteilung Februar 2013. Literatur Abensour, Miguel, »Der Mensch, das utopische Tier. Interview mit Miguel

descent, as a vibrant voice particularly among non-Hispanic Caribbeans in North America (Laguerre 1998; Jackson 2011). It also has much to do with concurrent developments in Haiti itself over the course of this period of heightened outmigration: dictatorships, military overthrows, coups, embargos, and most tragically, the earthquake of 2010. The few years since that catastrophe, have wit- nessed yet another assertion of the Haitian communities that are collective- ly referred to as the Haitian diaspora, as an important element in discussions of recovery and

of Language and Politics 5 (3): 305-354. Davies, S. 1997. Popular Opinion in Stalin’s Russia. Terror, Propaganda and Dissent, 1934-1941. Cambridge: Cambride University Press. Davies, S. 2004. Stalin and the Making of the Leader Cult in the 1930s. In The Leader Cult in Communist Dictatorships. Stalin and the Eastern Bloc, edited by B. Apor et al., 29-46. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Dawis, J. 1987. The American Presidency. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. Dijk, T. van. 1988. Ideology. A Multidisciplinary Approach. London: Sage. Dolezel, S. and M

of Language and Politics 5 (3): 305-354. Davies, S. 1997. Popular Opinion in Stalin’s Russia. Terror, Propaganda and Dissent, 1934-1941. Cambridge: Cambride University Press. Davies, S. 2004. Stalin and the Making of the Leader Cult in the 1930s. In The Leader Cult in Communist Dictatorships. Stalin and the Eastern Bloc, edited by B. Apor et al., 29-46. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Dawis, J. 1987. The American Presidency. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. Dijk, T. van. 1988. Ideology. A Multidisciplinary Approach. London: Sage. Dolezel, S. and M

categories, even though one (Ángel) is an actor and that the other (Zahara) is a performer – they are, in other words, in the business of taking on and off identities. With some qualifications, however, I argue that audiences are, in fact, encouraged to receive them as gay, or as transgender – identities increasingly tolerated in the New Spain, whether we are talking about the ‘hedonistic’ post-dictatorship, post-Franco days of the late 1970s and early 1980s or (even more) the neoliberal present, when the film was released (see D’Lugo 122). Even if, as with any film

of colonialism and oppression. Post-colonialism has brought with it new problems of corruption, dictatorships and conflicts between religious and ethnic grouping. There are often stark economic inequities within countries. In my own country, South Africa, these contrasts are extreme and inequality is rising; 41% of children live in the poorest 20% of households, while only 8% of children live in richest 20% of households. Alongside poverty come a host of deeply-rooted social problems, which are often interconnected. Artistic E xperiences and Commercial

within which there is no place for an onlooker. The Internet helped create the aura that all this was familiar. By channeling the outrage on the streets through a medium that you recognized, the narrative presented on news channels diluted the mystery in the events and chained your imagination to what is familiar. The layers of interpretation painted over the images diminished your fear of the unknown. “This is only an act against dictatorship.” “This is the indi- vidual cry for freedom.” “This is a demonstration for democracy.” “This revolution is non

, irony. In any case, the dictatorship of images is an ironic dictatorship… It now belongs to insider trading, the shameful and hidden complicity binding the ar tist who uses his or her aura of derision against the bewildered and doubtful masses.25 Whilst Baudrillard discusses his ideas about the role of art in the world, he uses the language of corporate economic scandals, insider trading, and mass media to describe what it has become and perhaps for good reason. It would be simplistic to see this just as critique of capitalism within the art world, and perhaps