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Table of contents Acknowledgements | vii Note on transliteration | ix Note on illustrations and copyrights | xi Foreword | xiii Introduction | 1 Positioning my study | 4 Research perspectives: blogs as media practice and the public sphere | 11 Methods and ethics off- and online | 21 I. THE FIELD | 31 The Field – Introduction | 33 1. Lebanese blogging in context, history, and comparison | 39 1.1 Context: media and internet in Lebanon | 39 1.2 A short history of blogging | 50 1.3 Lebanese blogging in a comparative perspective | 62

Bibliography | 187 Bibliography Abdo, Nahla (1994) “Nationalism and Feminism: Palestinian Women and the Intifada – No going back?” In Valentine Moghadam (ed.) Gender and National Identity. Women and Politics in Muslim Societies. London: Zed Books, pp. 148-170. Abul-Husn, Randa (1993) “Familism!” Al-Raida. The Quarterly Journal of the Institute for Women’s Studies in the Middle East (Beirut) 10/63, pp. 6-8. — (1994) “Women and HIV/AIDS. A Heterosexual Disease in Lebanon and the Middle East”. Al-Raida. The Quarterly Journal of the Institute for Women

Gendering the Translocal Village | 121 5. Gendering the Translocal Village Diaspora women are caught between patriarchies, ambiguous pasts, and futures. They connect and disconnect, forget and remember, in complex, strategic ways. (Clifford 1994: 314) Gendered Mobilities The following chapter is a contribution to the question of how translocal migration is gendered. Focusing on the specific experiences and agencies of men and women moving between South Lebanon and West Africa and vice versa, I would like to shed some light on how gender relations have

8. The dynamics of publicness After I have analysed different aspects of doing publicness with regard to the blog- gers’ audience and ethos, now this chapter revolves around the dynamics of public- ness, i.e. ways of going and being public and the bloggers’ positioning towards what they call ‘traditional’ media in Lebanon. In the first section (8.1)1 I analyse what it means for bloggers in my sample to be ‘public’, which parts of themselves they display online and how they negotiate the boundaries between privateness and publicness in their blogging

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Egyptian Artists Fabian Heerbaart | 103 From Equanimity to Agony: Portraits of Soldiers and Police Officers in Two Artwork Series of Egyptian Visual Artist Nermine Hammam Stephan Milich | 131 A Festival of Resistance: Poetic Documents of the Revolution Liza Franke | 153 Towards an Understanding of the Role of Political Satire in Sudan Larissa-Diana Fuhrmann | 171 PART III: SYRIA, PALESTINE, KUWAIT, LEBANON “Candies from Eastern Ghouta”: Dark Humor in Visualizing the Syrian Conflict Sabine Damir-Geilsdorf | 191 If a Duck is Drawn in

Foreword This book is the result of my Ph.D. project, conducted between 2009 and 2012 in the framework of a Ph.D. fellowship at Oslo University, Norway, with extended research periods in Beirut, Lebanon in 2009/2010 and 2011. The case studies of seven bloggers discussed in this book represent a specific moment in the history of the ever- and fast-changing landscape of digital media – or even “polymedia”, i.e. the hybrid media ecologies and varied use of media techno- logies.1 Moreover, they represent a historic specific moment of digital media in a

The Field – Introduction The aim of part I is to put blogging in Lebanon into context and introduce the local field of blogging that I analyse in more detail in the subsequent parts. Before enter- ing the ‘field of blogging’, I need to clarify my use of the notion and its relation to other relevant terms. FIELD THEORY Field theory is an analytic approach, not a static formal system MARTIN 2003: 24 As I outlined in the introduction, my perspective on blogging in Lebanon is guided by the field approach in the sense as used by Postill (2008

only person not involved in the constant movement to and from “the village”. Moreover, Appadurai reminds us that people were undoubtedly more mobile than the static typological approach of classical anthropology would suggest: “[…] natives, people confined to and by the places to which they belong, groups, unsullied by contact with a larger world have probably never existed” (Appadurai 1988: 39). 2003-07-17 12-07-44 --- Projekt: transcript.kusp.peleikis / Dokument: FAX ID 01d326803551408|(S. 25- 44) T02_01 gli.peleikis.kap02.p 26803551552 26 | Lebanese in

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....................................................... 45 Producing Nostalgic Places of Memory........................................... 47 Producing Traumatic Places of Memory......................................... 53 Producing Gendered and Generational Narratives of Place............ 59 Moving through Places ....................................................................... 72 The Lebanese in West Africa........................................................... 75 The Lebanese in Côte d’Ivoire......................................................... 79 4. The Translocal

4 | BLOGGING IN BEIRUT POSITIONING MY STUDY This study is situated within what is called the ‘Lebanese blogosphere’,9 which is known for being especially active in times of political crisis, for example in the Independence Intifada 2005 and in the ‘July War’ in 2006. Yet, also beyond these political events, a range of Lebanese bloggers has been writing about daily life, especially in Beirut, mocking political discussions, commenting on social issues and posting about cultural events in the capital. It is these everyday practices of and around blogging