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aesthetic categories. André Lepecki applies this distinction to discern choreogra- phy and dancing as two different logics: “We could say that choreography participates in the logic of the future – since choreogra- phy both demands and prepares the fulfilling and arrival of anticipated, pre-planned, and expected movements, gestures, steps, and positions. [...] Meanwhile, dancing (even when 1 Quotation taken from the documentary ‘Derrida’ by Kirby Dick and Amy Ziering Kofman, USA 2002. WHAT’S ‘NEXT

metaphorical.” (Martin 1998: 6) Indeed, dance’s immanent capacity for theorizing its social context of emergence would add to its political ontology a powerful critical force, supplementing with it those other traits dance shares with the political. Those common traits between dance and the political are: the ephemerality of its gestures, the self-fulfillment of its goals by the sheer enactment or actualization of its performance, and the unpredictability of its outcome. In 2005 Andrew Hewitt pushed the theoretical-epistemological-political- choreographic nexus to

Tanz und Technoromantik Überlegungen zu ,Robot Choreography‘ Marcel Behn Dieser Beitrag beschäftigt sich mit ,Robot Choreography‘1, einem Spezialgebiet der Robotik, das sich der Entwicklung (nicht-)humanoider Roboter für den Einsatz in Theateraufführungen widmet. Inwiefern der diesbezügliche Forschungsdiskurs technoromantische Züge aufweist, auf welche tanzgeschichtlichen Diskurse er da- bei wiederum implizit zurückgreift und welche epistemischen Herausforderungen sowie kritischen Problemstellungen sich hieraus ergeben, wird in diesem Beitrag aus

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, Daniela C. Maier, Angela Strauß | 71 Das Museum im Zeitalter des Ausstellens Wolfgang Ullrich | 83 Wer spricht? Ethnologische Museen und postkoloniale Herausforderungen Sarah Fründt | 97 Vom Wissen der Objekte Auf der Suche nach reflexiven Ausstellungskonzepten in der Ethnologie Stefanie Mauksch, Ursula Rao | 109 Das ausgestellte Bild oder Was zeigen im Museum gezeigte Bilder? Lambert Wiesing | 127 Bilder zeigen Bruno Haas | 141 Wissen in Bewegung – das Wissen der Künste Notizen zu William Forsythes „choreographic objects“ Cindy

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Performing memory in the age of Postmemory ...................................... 84 Imagining perforMemory ..................................................... 84 Moving center stage ......................................................... 88 ............................................ 90 Defining choreography........................................................ 91 Between telling history and performing memory .............................. 92 Emotions in motion .......................................................... 94 Memory2go

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Contents GABRIELE KLEIN, SANDRA NOETH Introduction | 7 SOCIAL REALMS GABRIELE KLEIN Dancing Politics: Worldmaking in Dance and Choreography | 17 RANDY MARTIN Between Intervention and Utopia: Dance Politics | 29 BOJANA KUNST Dance and Work: The Aesthetic and Political Potential of Dance | 47 LIGNA in conversation with SANDRA NOETH The Collective That Isn’t One | 61 HYBRID SPHERES SUSAN LEIGH FOSTER Jérôme Bel and Myself: Gender and Intercultural Collaboration | 73 SABINE SÖRGEL Transnationalism and Contemporary African Dance: Faustin Linyekula | 83

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| 65 Sprechende Gesten, farbig malende Klänge, tanzende Gewänder Auf den Spuren der Entwicklung einer intermedialen Ästhetik im russischen Theater des frühen 20. Jahrhunder ts Swetlana Lukanitschewa | 73 Alexander Truslits Bewegungsspuren Hans Brandner | 85 Geräuschhafte Körper Klangliche Materialitäten bei Karol Tyminski Daniela Hahn | 95 Körper-Hören Zu klanglichen Bewegungsspuren auf und in den Zuschau(-/hör)enden Katharina Rost | 109 BewegungSSpuren im Konzert der medien Audible and Inaudible Choreography Atmospheres of Choreographic Design Johannes Birringer

dance over that of choreography, the second step is reconsidering a historical and philosophical constellation, pre- cisely the one of Ludwig Feuerbach’s aversion to Georg Friedrich Wilhelm Hegel’s system of thought.1 In both positions there seems to be a parallel between choreo- graphy and “prejudiced thinking” on the one hand and dance and “unprejudiced sensuousness” on the other. With regard to Hegelian spirit Feuerbach asks: “If the essence of being is constituted by what is merely a determination of thought, how should being be distinguished from thought?”2

Romeo and Juliet Re-danced Choreographic Remakings of Shakespeare’s Tragedy MARIA MARCSEK-FUCHS Prokofiev’s ballet score to Romeo and Juliet (Op. 64) has been repeatedly recho- reographed since its first performance in 1938 until the present. Choreographies by Leonid Lavrovsky, John Cranko, Sir John MacMillan or Rudolf Nureyev, but also contemporary balletic versions, such as those by Matthew Bourne or Mark Morris, are only a few of the representative examples that not only re-adapt the musical score to choreographic dramaturgy but stand for re

it in new ways. Add to these standpoints also the question of a distinction between dance and choreography. Beyond the Ordinar y 65 Photo 1: Evfa Lilja photographed by Viktor Andersson. PoliTical Turbulence In a period of political turbulence, sharing space becomes even more significant. If mind and body are occupied with notions of the existence, that are out of synchronization with what is seen as normal and acceptable, it is a good idea to try alternative expressions. A choreographed event is a challenge that offers imagery we can use as an interpretation