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Con-texting Multilingualism
Migration, Kulturalisierung und Weltliteratur

materials, the objects of the Ethnological Museum were not even then used to illustrate the racial inferiority of their makers, nor were they displayed in significantly different ways after the Mu- seum’s directorship had passed in 1934 to Hermann Baumann, an NS- DAP party member who had studied with Frobenius. The famous “En- A Museum Without Walls for Walls Without a Museum 95 tartete Kunst” (“Degenerate Art”) traveling exhibit, made up of confis- catedmodernist artworks held to demonstrate the depravity of “Bolshe- vik” art movements, included many works containing

, 1978). Harley, George W. Masks as Agents of Social Control in Northeast Liberia (Cam- bridge, Mass.: Peabody Museum of American Archeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, 1950). Hart, George. “Isis,” in: Routledge Dictionary of Egyptian Gods and Goddesses (London: Routledge, 2005). Heltay, Hilary. The Articles and the Novelist: Reference Conventions and Read- er Manipulation in Patrick White’s Creation of Fictional Worlds (Germany: Gunter Narr Verlag Tübingen, 1983). Herskovits, Melville. J. Life in a Haitian Valley (New York: Octagon Books, 1964). Holas

trace, the immediacy of recording, the visibility of the image.« 188 ERINNERUNGSRÄUME IN DER ERZÄHLLITERATUR das Heraufziehen einer globalen Massenkultur und für die Dominanz und Konjunktur der Geschichtsschreibung angesichts fundamentaler historischer Einschnitte wie des Endes des Kolonialismus: »Among the new nations, in- dependence has swept into history societies newly awakened from their ethnological slumbers« (ebd.). Letzterer Aspekt führt auf die im nächsten Abschnitt diskutierten Beispiele von Erinnerungsräumen in der Erzähllitera- tur hin, denn der

Haselstein: »Puritans and Praying Indians. Versions of Transculturation in Mary Rowlandson’s Captivity Narrative (1682)«. In: Missions of Independence. A Literary Di- rectory. Hg. v. Gerhard Stilz. Amsterdam u. New York 2002, S. 3-14; Mit- chell Robert Breitwieser: American Puritanism and the Defense of Mourn- ing. Religion, Grief, and Ethnology in Mary Rowlandson’s Captivity Nar- rative. Madison, Wisconsin [u. a.] 1990 sowie Kathryn Zabelle Derounian- Stodola u. James Arthur Levernier: The Indian Captivity Narrative 1550- 1900. New York 1993. 5 Rowlandson: »A

behaviour as a whole, with the limited exceptions, perhaps, of the work done by the Centre Interfacul- taire en Science Affectives (Swiss Center for Affective Sciences), and by Klaus R. Scherer, father of the Component Process Model of emotion (CPM). Emotions are not solely based on anatomy, biology, psychology or culture. Thus, the study of emotions cannot be confined to individual disciplines, wheth- er psychology, philosophy, ethnology, sociology or linguistics. Emotions in human interaction must be appraised with respect to the particular situation, or to the

they often display a familiarity with the same texts and with the same cultural issues of their age, to which, of course, each of them contributes in highly origi- nal terms. They are all drawn to the relatively new disciplines of ethnology and anthropology, which they appropriate in the interest of their specific concerns (i.e. psychoanalysis, psychology, and the study of religion respectively). They also share a common interest in etymology. This is why it is possible to envisage 4 Cf. Locatelli

deportment of embarrassment to Eu- lenspiegel: He is not a creature of instinct, uninhibited scoundrel, but rather possesses a highly developed sense of discomfiture (Bollenbeck 1985: 141). BODY AND GENDER IN TILL EULENSPIEGEL | 125 spreads feces and manure on the fields and with that contributes to the fruitful- ness of both man and soil. In his ethnological research Claude Lévi-Strauss (1971) brought to light that the equalization of excrement, penis, and child pos- sesses universal traits, demonstrated by the siring and trickster motifs of prehis- toric American

American Archeology and Ethnology, Harvard University Press, 1950), pp. 7, 11, 17, 21, 26, 27. In the religious function, the person wearing the mask becomes a tool for the apparition of the deity. The mask wearer’s identity is usually kept secret and is in any event irrelevant. In many ritual communities, not only the identity of the wearer of the mask is kept secret, but the masks themselves can only be seen by a small number of select people, such as the elders of the village, and are often forbidden to the sight of women and young children. Some masks only